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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 19, 2003
WASHINGTON - During Bernadine Healy's tumultuous final six months as president of the American Red Cross, the nonprofit agency awarded her $1.9 million. As a result, Healy's replacement, former Rear Adm. Marsha Evans, and the agency's board have launched separate reviews of the way the Red Cross compensates its senior employees. Healy wept in public frustration when she was forced out of the top American Red Cross job in the tense and confusing aftermath of the Sept. 11 terror attacks in the fall of 2001.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Late last year, medical device maker Zimmer Holdings Inc. made two large payments to Dr. Andrew N. Pollak, chair of the University of Maryland Medical System's orthopedics department. The payments, one for $47,225 and the other for $45,902, were royalties paid to Pollak for work he did at Maryland Shock Trauma Center starting seven years ago in helping develop a clamp known as a fixator that could hold trauma patient's broken bones straight until they were ready for surgical repair.
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BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | June 27, 1994
Richard Cook and Jean Gerding were in my office, just back from training nonprofit organizations in Eastern Europe. They were talking about their experience as part of The Third Sector Project of the Johns Hopkins Institute of Policy Studies.We were each lamenting that, too often, consultants are called upon to "parachute in" and save the organization. This often takes the form of a one-shot workshop or an intense, but short, consulting stint. In many cases, that is not enough. What may be needed are periodic checkups, to see if milestones are being met and to plan the next steps.
NEWS
Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
Even as the Baltimore Police Department faces criticism over its handling of an officer caught on video punching a suspect, an outside audit of the Internal Affairs Division has raised questions about the thoroughness and fairness of the agency's misconduct investigations. A Baltimore lawyer who is a national expert on police discipline discovered "many flaws" within the Internal Affairs Division, including detectives who lack proper training, work under decades-old processes and are often pulled from their duties for other tasks.
NEWS
November 14, 2003
Matthew John Anderson, a partner in a Virginia management consulting firm and former Towson resident, died of liver cancer Monday at his home in Fairfax, Va. He was 35. Mr. Anderson was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. He was a 1985 graduate of Towson High School, where he played soccer, basketball and baseball. He was Rotary International's Student of the Year for 1985. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1989 in systems engineering from the University of Virginia. Since 1990, he had been a partner in Federal Client Group of Accenture LLP, a Reston, Va.-based management consultant.
BUSINESS
By David Rosenthal | October 8, 1990
As director of operations for a Baltimore home health-care company, Colleen Dougherty was used to networking. Still, she wasn't sure it could lead her to a new job."I was a little skeptical that this was a way to find a position," she says, recalling the job hunt that started last spring.Now, she's a believer.Through a concentrated networking campaign that reached more than 100 people over a four-month period, she landed a job with Ernst & Young's health care consulting practice in New York.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1997
Annapolis-based Forensic Technologies International Corp. announced yesterday that it has acquired two smaller firms in a move to become a one-stop shop in litigation consulting.Forensic Technologies, a company that grew from $20 million in annual sales in 1995 to $30.6 million last year -- the year the company went public -- acquired LWG Inc. of Northbrook, Ill., and a subsidiary, RestorTek Inc., as well as Nevada-based Bodaken Associates. The company did not disclose terms of the separate transactions.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1997
A Baltimore insurer and a consulting firm that advises black churches have teamed up to offer a new series of life insurance policies -- with biblical names and features including a tithing of death benefits -- designed to help black churches raise money and reach an "underserved market."The "Faithful Steward Series" of policies was announced yesterday by Fidelity and Guaranty Life Insurance, part of USF&G Corp., and H&R Consulting of Baltimore, which provides accounting, financial advice and other consulting services for black churches.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Singletary and Michelle Singletary,Evening Sun Staff | August 19, 1991
Maureen Ritcey says that when she grows up she wants to be a consultant -- just like her father. Then again, Maureen, 13, thinks she might want to train dolphins.But her indecision doesn't bother Larry Ritcey. He's just proud that his daughter's career aspirations include his profession.Ritcey, 49, is a self-employed management consultant.Management consulting is fast becoming a way for experienced managers to become entrepreneurs, according to David A. Lord, managering editor of Consulting News, a trade publication in Fitzwilliam, N.H. Management consultants can earn a good living.
BUSINESS
By Samantha Kappalman and Samantha Kappalman,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 17, 1997
In a move to build its network of local firms, American Express Tax and Business Services Inc. yesterday acquired the tax and consulting practice of Walpert, Smullian & Blumenthal, one of Baltimore's largest public accounting and consulting firms.Robert C. Basten, president and chief executive officer, American Express Tax and Business Services, said Walpert, Smullian met his first goal for this market: To find a firm that shared his company's philosophy and had a good reputation."Our next goal for this market is to double or triple the business operation in the next five or six years," Basten said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
John Bruce Innes Jr., a former marketing executive for Genesis Health Ventures who was later a senior housing consultant, died July 22 of brain injuries suffered in a fall while he was vacationing in Greece. The Lutherville resident was 70. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Springfield, Pa., he was the son of John B. Innes Sr., a chemist, and Marion Rohrer Innes, a teacher. A 1962 graduate of Springfield High School, where he was on the school's newspaper editing staff, he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree at George Washington University, where he belonged to the Kappa Sigma Fraternity and was Inter-Fraternity Council president.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
The Baltimore County school board gave Superintendent Dallas Dance a $5,000 a year pay increase this week, part of several changes to his four-year employment contract. The increase raises his annual salary to $265,000. School officials said the percentage increase was equivalent to the 1.9 percent average increase teachers will get, in addition to a 3 percent bonus. The contract also will be amended so that Dance will not be allowed to take any outside consulting jobs. The board's ethics panel found him in violation of its rules in taking a part-time job with a professional development company last year.
NEWS
June 23, 2014
Enterprise Worldwide's highest honor, the Firm of the Year award, was presented to Weyrich Cronin & Sorra at the Enterprise Worldwide Annual Symposium on May 29 at Walt Disney World's Contemporary Resort. This award is chosen each year by the EW Support Team based on the firm's involvement in the association and its overall growth as a firm. "Weyrich Cronin & Sorra was the obvious choice for Firm of the Year this year," Adelaide Ness, executive director of Enterprise Worldwide and EVP of The Rainmaker Companies, said in a news release.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
The Baltimore County school board ethics panel has ruled that Superintendent Dallas Dance violated rules when he took a consulting job with a professional development company that does business with the school system. School board President Lawrence Schmidt said Thursday that in light of the ruling, the board and Dance have agreed that he will not take any other consulting jobs as long as he works for the school system. Dance also said in a statement that he would be more careful to avoid conflicts.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
Charles W. Stills Jr., a Baltimore financial consultant who also was a church office manager, died Thursday in his sleep of unknown causes at his East Baltimore home. He was 80. The son of Charles W. Stills Sr., a steelworker and watchmaker, and Clara Henry Stills, a homemaker, Charles William Stills Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised on East Eager Street and later Caroline Street. After graduating in 1951 from Dunbar High School, Mr. Williams enrolled at what was then Morgan State College, where he earned a bachelor's degree in business in 1955.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, Meredith Cohn and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
The board overseeing Maryland's health exchange voted unanimously Tuesday evening to scrap its dysfunctional website and adopt software developed by Deloitte Consulting and used by the more successful health exchange in Connecticut. The software is free for Maryland to use but Health Secretary Joshua M. Sharfstein will negotiate an emergency $40 million to $50 million contract with the software company to develop the site. Isabel FitzGerald, secretary of the state's Department of Information Technology, who stepped in to help fix the exchange, will oversee the project.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer JoAnna C. Daemmrich contributed to this article | December 16, 1998
The grand jury bribery and extortion indictment of Larry Young handed up Monday brought to an end a yearlong investigation, but it leaves unanswered a number of questions about the former state senator's other activities -- and if he will be prosecuted for them.The indictment raises questions about what role, if any, key members of the Glendening administration might have played in Young's lobbying campaign to help a health care company that allegedly rewarded him with payoffs and personal computers.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 26, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In a move that could anger some on Capitol Hill, Vice President Al Gore has begun consulting with Senate Democrats about President Clinton's impeachment trial and is exploring a role for himself in the procedural disputes leading up to it.In an interview with the Los Angeles Times conducted Tuesday night but embargoed for release until today, Gore suggested that he might have to cast a tie-breaking vote in pretrial motions. Gore, whose only constitutional duty is to preside over the Senate, might be called on to break a tie vote, for instance, in such procedural matters as the admissibility of evidence.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
John Patrick Cook, a consultant in health care sales who was active in Baltimore County recreation league soccer coaching, died Friday at University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. The Towson resident was 44. Family members said Mr. Cook died of undetermined causes. Born in Racine, Wis., he was the son of Gene Paul Cook Jr., who worked in sales, and Colleen Majorano Cook, a homemaker. When he was 10, he moved with his family to Doylestown, Pa. He attended Kutz Elementary School and Holicong Junior High.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
As heavy snow shut down businesses and federal offices again this month, liberated workers tweeted about sipping hot cocoa, lying under blankets and bingeing on "House of Cards. " But Edwin Gotico spent the day reading and responding to emails and updating status reports as a realty specialist for a General Services Administration contractor. Gotico, who lives in Springfield, Va., is one of the growing number of employees the federal government encourages to work from home. Before he was allowed to work from home, Gotico, like most federal teleworkers, had to sign a contract that requires him to work during weather events that cause managers to shutter offices and give workers there the day off. That requirement has allowed the government to maintain a level of productivity through snow days this winter.
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