Advertisement
HomeCollectionsConstruction Projects
IN THE NEWS

Construction Projects

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2013
Rep. Andy Harris has introduced legislation to end the favored treatment union contractors receive on construction projects paid for by the federal government. The proposal, which in the past has been strongly supported by construction trade groups but opposed by labor, is a response to an executive order President Barack Obama signed early in his first term that required agencies to consider using project-labor agreements to set wages and site rules on federal construction projects.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
The ramp carrying southbound Interstate 395 traffic onto northbound Interstate 95 in Baltimore will close overnight as part of the ongoing work repairing deck surfaces and joints in the area, according to the Maryland Transportation Authority. The ramp, a main artery for downtown traffic onto northbound I-95, will close at 10 tonight and reopen at 5 a.m. on Tuesday morning, the MdTA said. Drivers will be detoured to southbound I-95, to Caton Avenue and then onto northbound I-95, the MdTA said.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 26, 2008
In the wake of a troubling audit, a legislative panel's decision to delay some construction projects at Morgan State University sends a proper warning for the school to get its house in order. A House of Delegates subcommittee voted unanimously to eliminate or restrict $6 million for various capital projects - actions that must still be approved by the full House and the Senate. Morgan officials complain that as a historically black institution, the university is being singled out for harsher treatment than other institutions that receive state dollars.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
The Annapolis City Council adopted a $96.5 million operating budget early Tuesday morning that lays off seven employees, increases a tax on businesses and increases some parking fines. The budget also eliminates the Annapolis Economic Development Corp., which was created in 2010 to attract and promote businesses in the city. The agency's funding, which was $450,000 this year, will run out at the end of the month as the fiscal year ends. Businesses could pay up to $150 more per year due to a 17 percent increase in the personal property tax, which is a tax on equipment and merchandise that's paid by all businesses, according to Brian Woodward, acting city manager.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | September 13, 1993
The public will have its first chance tonight to comment on next year's 40 proposed school construction projects, which have a price tag of $77 million in state and county money.The hearing, sponsored by the Board of Education, will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the school system's central offices on Riva Road in Annapolis. The school board meets on the first and third Wednesdays each month, but moved this week's meeting because of the Jewish holiday Rosh Hashanah this Wednesday.Among the items the school board will be considering tonight is a proposal to seek the state's approval to plan a new Meade Area Middle School as well as the state's commitment to give construction money immediately.
NEWS
By Ed Gunts and Ed Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | March 8, 2009
When developers began construction on the Four Seasons hotel and condominium tower in Harbor East early last year, it was shaping up to be one of Baltimore's tallest buildings, at 43 stories. But earlier this year, the development team announced plans to complete only 18 stories, delaying condominium construction until the residential real estate market improves. That means the waterfront tower won't set a city height record any time soon. Elsewhere in Baltimore, projects representing a proposed investment of more than $1 billion have been postponed, scaled back or scrapped altogether.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | July 17, 1999
School officials statewide -- in the midst of the largest construction and repair campaign in recent history -- worry that fierce competition for reliable contractors may drive up costs and delay badly needed projects.Blessed by $257.5 million in state school construction money this year, school systems are putting up modern buildings and replacing everything from the pipes and wiring to the roofs on aging structures.But they've run into snags: In Anne Arundel County recently, officials found no takers when they put out bids for installation of a sprinkler system at South River High School.
NEWS
By DAVID FOLKENFLIK and DAVID FOLKENFLIK,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1996
The University of Maryland College Park has embarked on an ambitious series of construction projects, totaling more than $200 million, that administrators there say will transform the campus for years to come.From playing fields to plant science research to the performing arts, the university has pursued broad-based plans for several years that now are taking shape as the most visible construction push at College Park in decades."It's like Christmas, Hanukkah and all the holidays wrapped up into one," said Thomas A. Fretz, dean of the university's College of Agriculture and Natural Resources.
NEWS
March 15, 1999
Highlights in Annapolis today:Senate Budget and Taxation Committee hearing on state construction projects. Noon. Room 100. Senate office building.House Appropriations Committee hearing on state construction projects. 1 p.m. Room 130. House office building.Senate meets. 8 p.m. Senate chamber.House of Delegates meets. 8 p.m. House chamber.Pub Date: 3/15/99
NEWS
December 1, 2008
A brief article Friday about a corruption case failed to note that the University of Maryland, Baltimore County alerted the attorney general's office after finding discrepancies in construction projects and cooperated in the resulting investigation.
NEWS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2014
A number of road construction projects will be causing traffic delays Saturday in Baltimore County and Baltimore City. • In Baltimore County, portions of Interstate 95 near White Marsh are closed for construction. Delays could stretch to the Harford County line. Official suggest using Route 40 as an alternative. • In Baltimore County, a bridge deck replacement at the border of Baltimore and Carroll counties will close the right lanes of Route 140 from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday • In Baltimore County, Liberty Road is being resurfaced from the Liberty Reservoir Bridge and Liberty Ridge Court.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
A major construction project on Interstate 95, set to begin Sunday, will impact traffic in Baltimore for the next two years - shifting and narrowing lanes and forcing ramp closures and detours. The $66 million project to remove and replace the existing concrete deck and roadway joints of 4.4 miles of the elevated highway between Caton Avenue and the Fort McHenry Tunnel south of downtown is expected to last through the middle of 2016, the Maryland Transportation Authority said Friday.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | October 16, 2013
The pact that will facilitate the $1 billion, decade-long effort to upgrade Baltimore city school facilities was finalized today, with a unanimous vote of the Maryland Board of Public Works to approve a Memorandum of Understanding that will serve as a blueprint for revitalizing the city's dilapidated school infrastructure. The memorandum, which outlines the roles and responsibilities of state and local agencies over the course of the system's 10-year facilities plan, was a condition of the law that allows the district to orchestrate and fund 30 to 35 renovations and new structures.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2013
To win the two-bedroom Canton condo Jillian Rimmer wanted, she offered to pay $75 more a month than the asking rent of $1,600. It worked: The landlord chose her bid, and she and a roommate live there now. "I was willing to pay that for the great location and parking," said Rimmer, who is in her early 30s and who moved to Baltimore from Columbia. "I had quite a bit of trouble finding a place. Pretty much as soon as a listing went online, it was gone. " Many interested in urban living face the same problem in Baltimore's competitive rental market, in which a limited supply of quality rentals in popular neighborhoods such as Federal Hill, Fells Point and Mount Vernon have tenants scrambling to secure leases.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
Ernest T. Davis, a retired construction project manager and a World War II B-24 pilot, died Feb. 13 of heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 92. The son of a civil engineer and a government worker, Ernest Theodore Davis was born in Bemis, Tenn., and later moved with his family to Washington. He was a graduate of Bethesda-Chevy Chase High School and started engineering studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. In 1942, he enlisted in what was then the Army Air Corps, and after completing training as a B-24 Liberator pilot, was assigned to the 8th Air Force in England.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | March 7, 2013
It's not much of a surprise that the Maryland State Highway Administration is again looking at making I-95 wider in Harford County from the Route 24 interchange south to the Baltimore County line and beyond. The state has dozens of projects in the long-term planning phase at any given moment and, depending on the politics of the moment, any such project can be jumped to the head of the line, or bumped back. The latest series of I-95 construction projects that have included major upgrades of the Route 24, White Marsh Boulevard and Baltimore Beltway interchanges, as well as the addition of extra lanes, was a low priority early in Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s administration, then it suddenly became a high priority and construction was begun.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Shogren and Elizabeth Shogren,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 9, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration will give the oil and gas industry two years to comply with a storm water regulation that goes into effect tomorrow, and it will consider granting the industry a permanent exemption. Environmental groups and environmentalists in Congress criticized this as granting special rights to a favored industry, at the risk of polluting the nation's rivers and lakes. The administration said it needs more time to determine the impact the rule would have on the industry and whether it should be applied to production and exploration for oil and gas. The rule orders builders and others whose construction projects cover anywhere from 1 acre to 5 acres to get the permission of state or federal officials before beginning the work.
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS and GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | April 27, 2006
Just days after news that Carroll County schools would lose $2 million in state funding for school construction projects, local officials announced yesterday that the system would receive the money. "The quote I have [from state officials] is that `The funding is not in jeopardy,'" Del. Susan W. Krebs, who represents South Carroll, said during a joint meeting of the school board and the county commissioners. "I'm confident we're going to have the $2 million. It's well-deserved." Last week, legislative budget analysts said that a state property tax cut supported by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and approved by the Board of Public Works would delay $16 million in school construction projects across the state.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun and By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
Most of the Howard County public library's 184 employees would have the right to unionize and bargain for pay and benefits under a bill that has been endorsed by the county delegation to Annapolis. The legislation follows an unsuccessful attempt in the 2010 legislative session to pass a bill that would apply to all library employees in the state and is one of 17 county bills now before the Maryland General Assembly. Other county measures cover alcohol sales, charity casino nights, the county sheriff's salary and an array of bond bills for construction projects.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2013
Rep. Andy Harris has introduced legislation to end the favored treatment union contractors receive on construction projects paid for by the federal government. The proposal, which in the past has been strongly supported by construction trade groups but opposed by labor, is a response to an executive order President Barack Obama signed early in his first term that required agencies to consider using project-labor agreements to set wages and site rules on federal construction projects.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.