Advertisement
HomeCollectionsConstruction Paper
IN THE NEWS

Construction Paper

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Donna Erickson and Donna Erickson,King Features Syndicate | May 6, 1995
Let the kids show Mom that she's the best, hands down, with this personalized Mother's Day card. You'll need: a large 12-inch by 18-inch sheet of construction paper or tagboard in a light color such as yellow, pink or lavender; construction paper in assorted colors; colorful, shredded tissue paper; white glue; empty margarine tub; paint brush, pencil and scissorsWith the pencil, outline your child's hand with fingers slightly spread apart on a piece of...
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2012
As the Newtown, Conn., community looks for comfort in the wake of one of the most deadly school shootings in history, it will be able to tap into the hearts of students in Baltimore City. Students at Dallas F. Nicholas Sr. Elementary School have joined a national movement called "Paper Hearts Across America," an initiative that started over construction paper and scissors in the home of a Billings, Mont., family and has sparked a nationwide effort to send millions of hearts to Connecticut.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 11, 2000
Beginning in the 18th century, the rowhouse became the most popular house type in Baltimore. During that century, rowhouses provided shelter for almost all Baltimoreans! Today, one of the city's architectural trademarks is still the rowhouse. Drive down the streets in neighborhoods throughout Baltimore, and you'll see the distinctive tall, narrow and deep rowhouses, with fronts made of brick, brownstone, and formstone, and white marble steps leading up to the front doors! Builders adapted their styles over the years and added elements such as front porches, peaked roofs, bay windows, and carved details.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2012
With limited materials, a patriotic theme, and their own ingenuity, students at The Harbour School put together their ninth annual Fourth of July parade of paper floats Tuesday. Working on a tight schedule, each class at the Owings Mills school for children with learning and developmental disabilities built their entries, bearing in mind this year's "O Say Can You See" theme. With teachers' supply carts for wheels, they marched their sparkling displays before a panel of judges. "We give them a small bag of supplies but no money," said Martha Schneider, program director at the Owings Mills school, whose 106 students range in age from 6 to 21 years.
FEATURES
By Donna Erickson and Donna Erickson,King Features Syndicate | June 3, 1995
For this simple art activity, your child will actually draw on sandpaper and with adult assistance transfer the drawing onto a piece of paper. The texture of the sandpaper will create a beautiful picture made up of tiny dots. It's especially fun for kids because their artwork will resemble pointillism, a painting technique used by post-impressionist painter Georges Seurat. He used dots of colors instead of brush strokes in his paintings.Here's how to do sandpaper art:Using crayons, draw a picture on a piece of fine-grain sandpaper.
NEWS
October 31, 1999
Get as silly as you like with these simple-to-make books.What you need* child's favorite storybook* variety of magazines with lots of photographs* 8 1/2 -by-11-inch sheets of construction paper* child scissors* nontoxic white glue* 6 large interlocking metal rings* black washable marker* hole puncherWhat to do together1. Read your child's storybook together. Then, in preparation for making the flip books, discuss the book in terms of who (people or animal characters), what (activities or events)
FEATURES
By Donna Erickson and Donna Erickson,King Features Syndicate | July 30, 1994
Creating a puppet character out of one's imagination is play for children, whether a furry kitten or a scary monster. And when the curtains rise, the puppets can go on stage and laugh and cry or dare to do anything their creator imagines.To make a cereal box puppet, you will need: 1 single-portion cereal box, paper lining removed and open end glued shut; poster paint and brushes; markers; construction paper; glue; scissors; odds and ends (feathers, pipe cleaners, bottle caps, felt scraps, etc.)
FEATURES
February 14, 2000
It's time to start collecting valentines -- so you need a mailbox by your desk or door. Here's an easy one that's fun to make. What you need: Two heavy-duty white paper plates Construction paper Craft glue One box of Red Hots candy Paper punch 4 red chenille stems Red markers Pink or white doilies Red and white curling ribbon Heart/Valentine stickers What to do: 1. Take one plate and draw a small heart in the upper half. With adult help, cut out the heart and tape a photo of yourself behind it. Decorate top half with construction paper hearts or stickers and red markers.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | December 26, 1993
Nearly 90 paper planes took flight in Freedom last week. Weather was not a factor as the test pilots flew their craft indoors.Some planes sputtered; some soared; some crashed at takeoff; a few went the distance -- the 50-foot length of the Freedom Elementary School cafeteria.Fifth-grade aerodynamics engineers fabricated their planes from paper, tape and glue. With entries named Cool Thunder, Silver Streak and Super Snyder, the test pilots competed for prizes in six categories."They had to be made of paper with no weights, and they had to fly three feet," said Sarah O'Neill, teacher and air traffic controller.
NEWS
By Jon M. Andes | September 2, 2003
AS I ENTER a third-grade classroom, the room is buzzing with activity. The children are taking laptop computers from a portable cart and placing the computers on their desks. The assignment displayed on the erasable chalkboard has the children creating and illustrating their own stories. The children are using word processing software to write individual stories. They will use the Internet as a source for ideas for illustrations. As the children excitedly pursue the creative process, the teacher patiently reminds them to be careful with the computers.
NEWS
By Jon M. Andes | September 2, 2003
AS I ENTER a third-grade classroom, the room is buzzing with activity. The children are taking laptop computers from a portable cart and placing the computers on their desks. The assignment displayed on the erasable chalkboard has the children creating and illustrating their own stories. The children are using word processing software to write individual stories. They will use the Internet as a source for ideas for illustrations. As the children excitedly pursue the creative process, the teacher patiently reminds them to be careful with the computers.
NEWS
October 11, 2000
Beginning in the 18th century, the rowhouse became the most popular house type in Baltimore. During that century, rowhouses provided shelter for almost all Baltimoreans! Today, one of the city's architectural trademarks is still the rowhouse. Drive down the streets in neighborhoods throughout Baltimore, and you'll see the distinctive tall, narrow and deep rowhouses, with fronts made of brick, brownstone, and formstone, and white marble steps leading up to the front doors! Builders adapted their styles over the years and added elements such as front porches, peaked roofs, bay windows, and carved details.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2000
Sweltering temperatures and threatening storm clouds may have kept some away from the opening weekend of the Columbia Festival of the Arts, but those who came yesterday had a blast. Hundreds of people swarmed Lake Kittamaqundi, enjoying performances, arts and crafts and the ever-popular Italian ice treat. Festival organizers said they couldn't gauge how many people strolled the lakefront yesterday but were thrilled that ticket sales have been brisk. "We've gotten tons of response," said Mary Ann Knab, marketing director for the festival, who added that a lakefront performance by Cajun band BeauSoleil attracted several hundred Friday night.
FEATURES
February 14, 2000
It's time to start collecting valentines -- so you need a mailbox by your desk or door. Here's an easy one that's fun to make. What you need: Two heavy-duty white paper plates Construction paper Craft glue One box of Red Hots candy Paper punch 4 red chenille stems Red markers Pink or white doilies Red and white curling ribbon Heart/Valentine stickers What to do: 1. Take one plate and draw a small heart in the upper half. With adult help, cut out the heart and tape a photo of yourself behind it. Decorate top half with construction paper hearts or stickers and red markers.
NEWS
October 31, 1999
Get as silly as you like with these simple-to-make books.What you need* child's favorite storybook* variety of magazines with lots of photographs* 8 1/2 -by-11-inch sheets of construction paper* child scissors* nontoxic white glue* 6 large interlocking metal rings* black washable marker* hole puncherWhat to do together1. Read your child's storybook together. Then, in preparation for making the flip books, discuss the book in terms of who (people or animal characters), what (activities or events)
NEWS
February 9, 1998
THE TRAIL of commuters from northern Baltimore County into Harford County's sprawl often winds along Paper Mill Road, a nearly six-mile stretch of two-lane that at times becomes so clogged with traffic it's also known as a "roller coaster ride from hell."If you've ever taken Paper Mill, you certainly will remember its sharp bends, rusty, rustic, narrow bridge and traffic jams that sometimes make the drive a white-knuckle experience."For 18 years, I've been traveling this route," explained Scott B., a commuter from Forest Hill.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry | October 27, 1996
I LOVE HALLOWEEN. It reminds me of my happy childhood days as a student at Wampus Elementary School in Armonk, N.Y., when we youngsters used to celebrate Halloween by making decorations out of construction paper and that white paste that you could eat. This is also how we celebrated Columbus Day, Washington's Birthday, Lincoln's Birthday, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Easter, New Year's, Valentine's Day, Mother's Day, Father's Day, Armistice Day, Flag Day, Arbor...
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol | January 6, 1991
It was an old, stitched pillbox hat with a black veil that fell past his nose. It reminded him of a funeral. And when 10-year-old Eric Brooks put it on, he began to move his lips back and forth in the manner of an old woman heaving with sorrow.Different kinds of hats, he declared, change your personality.In a classroom at Coppin State College in Northwest Baltimore yesterday, Eric set about creating his own hat by attaching a fuzzy snowman, a drawing, old balloons and other odds and ends to a plain rectangle of construction paper.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry | October 27, 1996
I LOVE HALLOWEEN. It reminds me of my happy childhood days as a student at Wampus Elementary School in Armonk, N.Y., when we youngsters used to celebrate Halloween by making decorations out of construction paper and that white paste that you could eat. This is also how we celebrated Columbus Day, Washington's Birthday, Lincoln's Birthday, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Easter, New Year's, Valentine's Day, Mother's Day, Father's Day, Armistice Day, Flag Day, Arbor...
FEATURES
By Donna Erickson and Donna Erickson,King Features Syndicate | June 3, 1995
For this simple art activity, your child will actually draw on sandpaper and with adult assistance transfer the drawing onto a piece of paper. The texture of the sandpaper will create a beautiful picture made up of tiny dots. It's especially fun for kids because their artwork will resemble pointillism, a painting technique used by post-impressionist painter Georges Seurat. He used dots of colors instead of brush strokes in his paintings.Here's how to do sandpaper art:Using crayons, draw a picture on a piece of fine-grain sandpaper.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.