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By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
An ambitious plan to secure tens of millions of dollars in state funding to fix Baltimore's dilapidated school buildings is the top priority for city officials in the General Assembly session that begins next week. The city's delegates and state senators are also united in opposition to Gov. Martin O'Malley's plan to build a new juvenile jail in Baltimore. "The governor had planned on building a new juvenile jail. That kind of flies in the face of the philosophy for most of us," said Del. Curt Anderson, who chairs the city's House delegation.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, visiting Annapolis to make the case for the city's $2.4 billion school construction plan, has finished her meeting with House Speaker Michael E. Busch and has arrived at the State House for talks with Gov. Martin O'Malley. Rawlings-Blake, accompanied by Baltimore schools chief Andres Alonso, met for about an hour with  the speaker in the House office building. The two were expected to outline Alonso's plan to finance the massive rebuilding of the state's oldest school system by converting the city's annual allocation of school construction money into a guaranteed block grant that would let it issue bonds.
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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1999
Carroll County's new multimillion-dollar District Courthouse appears to be back on track for design and construction money in state budgets for 2000 and 2001, county officials said yesterday.In December, officials discovered what they described as a glitch in the project: Construction money that was supposed to have been in the state's next fiscal budget was omitted from a preliminary draft.Steven D. Powell, county director of management and budget, said the project is expected to receive $7.6 million in construction funding in 2001, and $63,000 for design in the 2000 budget.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
An ambitious plan to secure tens of millions of dollars in state funding to fix Baltimore's dilapidated school buildings is the top priority for city officials in the General Assembly session that begins next week. The city's delegates and state senators are also united in opposition to Gov. Martin O'Malley's plan to build a new juvenile jail in Baltimore. "The governor had planned on building a new juvenile jail. That kind of flies in the face of the philosophy for most of us," said Del. Curt Anderson, who chairs the city's House delegation.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1999
Carroll County's new multimillion-dollar District Courthouse appears to be back on track for design and construction money in state budgets for 2000 and 2001, county officials said yesterday.In December, officials discovered what they described as a glitch in the project: Construction money that was supposed to have been in the state's next fiscal budget was omitted from a preliminary draft.But Steven D. Powell, county director of management and budget, said the project is expected to receive $7.6 million in construction funding in 2001, and $63,000 for design in the 2000 budget.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
State Comptroller Peter Franchot criticized Baltimore County leaders Wednesday for failing to use $7 million in school construction funds to air-condition schools. Franchot, who welcomed a group of Middleborough Elementary children and their parents to Annapolis to testify before the Board of Public Works, asked the board to force the county to spend at least half of the money, which has come from the state alcohol tax, on air-conditioning. But Gov. Martin O'Malley and Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp, the other board members, said that while they were sympathetic to the pleas from children and parents, they would not interfere with local decisions on school construction spending.
NEWS
July 3, 1994
The Maryland Board of Public Works has approved $1.8 million in state construction money for a 356-student addition and a 6,500-square-foot gym at C. Milton Wright High School in Bel Air.Construction will begin as soon as the project is bid, county officials said. It should be completed in early 1996.The state approved the project last year, but denied construction money for the 38,473-square-foot addition twice.In a last-ditch effort to move the project forward, county officials invited Gov. William Donald Schaefer to tour the school last month.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
The O'Malley administration backed away yesterday from its plan to take control of city money used for school construction, saying it reached an agreement with school officials that will give it more oversight of how such dollars are spent. The agreement calls for two city employees to help the school system manage renovation and construction projects. The city will also devote two of its weekly meetings with senior school staff every month to monitoring capital projects. School officials had opposed the city taking over about $90 million in city bond money approved for school construction.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2003
Members of Maryland's congressional delegation said yesterday that they intend to seek federal money to begin building one segment of the Baltimore Regional Rail Plan - an east-west line from Woodlawn to Fells Point. But the Ehrlich administration said a final decision has not been made on whether to seek the money, and it was unclear if the delegation would proceed without the state's blessing. The congressmen met for more than an hour yesterday with state Transportation Secretary Robert L. Flanagan.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | January 25, 2007
The Board of Public Works might never be the same. When Gov. Martin O'Malley and Comptroller Peter Franchot sat down for the first meeting yesterday of the obscure but powerful panel that approves most state spending, they spent much of their time talking about how to expand the state's Minority Business Enterprise program. Their predecessors, by contrast, had rankled black leaders by asking recently, "When will MBE E-N-D?" Instead of going on about immigrants, AIDS victims or Koreans, as predecessor William Donald Schaefer had, Franchot talked about encouraging counties to build more eco-friendly schools.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2012
Comptroller Peter Franchot on Wednesday denounced a revised deal that allowed the company licensed to operate a casino at the Rocky Gap resort in Allegany County to reduce the scale of the project as a "complete bait and switch" on the part of the company. Franchot had questioned why the modified deal, which cut the number of slot machines at the resort from 850 to 500, did not have to be brought back to the Board of Public Works for approval. "Don't you get the sense we're being played for fools here?"
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake urged members of the Baltimore House delegation to  resist the urge to use the gambling expansion bill that will be the subject of a General Assembly special session next week as leverage for a wish list of the city's other needs. In a letter to the delegation, the mayor told city lawmakers that any effort to hold back their votes in exchange for unrelated items could lead to the collapse of an effort that would include allowing table games at the planned casino in downtown Baltimore -- something both Rawlings-Blake and the prospective operator of the gambling hall want.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2011
The state set in motion Wednesday an "aggressive" $100 million renovation of BWI Marshall Airport that will streamline security check-ins, eliminate a major passenger bottleneck and give its No. 1 carrier room to grow. With minimal discussion, the state Board of Public Works unanimously approved construction money for a project that will remake the oldest part of the terminal at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport over the next two years. The project will be BWI's most ambitious undertaking since the $288 million Southwest Airlines terminal opened in 2005.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
State Comptroller Peter Franchot criticized Baltimore County leaders Wednesday for failing to use $7 million in school construction funds to air-condition schools. Franchot, who welcomed a group of Middleborough Elementary children and their parents to Annapolis to testify before the Board of Public Works, asked the board to force the county to spend at least half of the money, which has come from the state alcohol tax, on air-conditioning. But Gov. Martin O'Malley and Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp, the other board members, said that while they were sympathetic to the pleas from children and parents, they would not interfere with local decisions on school construction spending.
EXPLORE
June 22, 2011
The latest school facilities construction plan, which was presented to the Harford County Board of Education during its meeting June 13, shows once again that the school system and the county government are not on the same page when it comes to planning future school construction. The plan ranks the Homestead Wakefield Elementary reconstruction as the first priority, followed by construction of a new John Archer School, which would be built as an addition to Bel Air Middle. Next in line behind those two will be the renovation or reconstruction of Youth's Benefit Elementary in Fallston, followed by the reconstruction of William Paca/Old Post Road Elementary in Abingdon.
NEWS
May 26, 2011
I' m a 17 year old high school student attending Baltimore Polytechnic Institute. I'm responding to the article by Liz F. Kay ("Size of planned youth jail to shrink," May 13) that explains details of the shrinking of the planned youth jail that is going to be built. When I read the article I was glad to hear that crime among the youth in Baltimore City has declined. As a youth in the city, I feel proud to see my fellow peers making better decisions. Although I'm completely against spending money to build a new jail when Baltimore public schools will have to make budget cuts next year to extracurricular activities, I do think decreasing the size of the jail is a good decision by city officials.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1998
Carroll school representatives will begin their annual quest today to persuade state officials that the county deserves more money to build and upgrade schools next year.Their trip to the Interagency Committee for School Construction in Baltimore is one of the first steps in a long series of requests and appeals as counties compete for state money for school construction and renovations.Last month, the committee's staff approved $4.7 million of Carroll's $21.7 million request to help pay for capital projects in fiscal year 2000, which begins in July.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | September 16, 1992
Even though the county is anticipating sharp cuts in state aid, school officials are preparing an $89 million capital budget they say is necessary to avoid overcrowded schools. "To the extent that any of these [projects] are not funded, we end up doing a balancing act," said Director of Planning and Construction Michael Raible. "None of the items are frivolous." The Board of Education has scheduled a public hearing on the proposed capital budget at 7:30 tonight at the school headquarters, 2644 Riva Road.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2011
As the state Board of Public Works approved $264 million for school construction Wednesday, two counties asked to delay new buildings because they aren't certain they can come up with the money to finish or operate them — an unprecedented sign, officials said, of the continuing financial challenges confronting local governments. "We've never dealt with anything like this before, where we've come to this sort of crisis point," David G. Lever, director of the state's Public School Construction Program, said of the requests by Charles and Wicomico counties.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2011
A bit less borrowing and a little more cash mark Howard County Executive Ken Ulman's proposed $179.3 million capital budget proposal for fiscal 2012, along with a larger emphasis on environmental projects. His twin goals, he said, are "to finish up some of these larger projects and to continue progress on parks like Blandair, and in education. " To that end, Ulman wants to spend $10 million for storm-water facility upgrades, stream and watershed improvements and retrofits to capture rainwater and prevent runoff.
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