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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
For Maryland's building industry, the good times may be coming back. The construction sector, which has been in the tank for the better part of five years, is on the verge of receiving a sizable infusion of money from recent decisions in Annapolis. Much to the chagrin of many Maryland motorists, the General Assembly has approved legislation to charge hundreds of millions of dollars a year in additional gas taxes - money that will build new roads and transit systems. Also heading to Gov. Martin O'Malley's desk is a $1 billion plan to build 15 new schools in Baltimore and renovate three dozen more.
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NEWS
July 20, 2014
Thanks for the op-ed by Barbara A. Res about the dearth of women in the construction industry ( "Construction: a boys club," July 13). We in the Tradeswomen movement have been beating our heads against the concrete wall of institutionalized sexism for 40 years now with little change. Before the Reagan administration undermined affirmative action, we were making some progress. The federal government had our backs then, with policies that encouraged our participation. It was understood that women needed to achieve a critical mass in the industry to overcome isolation and harassment.
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NEWS
July 17, 2014
Barbara A. Res should do her homework regarding alleged employment discrimination against women in the construction industry ( "Construction: a boy's club," July 14). The United Brotherhood of Carpenters recently pointed to a job which maintained 20 percent female employment for the 18-month duration. Times are changing and Ms. Res' incorrect commentary only fuels outdated stereotypes. For more information, you can contact the Prairie Arctic Regional Council of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters.
NEWS
July 18, 2014
Regarding Barbara A. Res' recent commentary on women in the construction industry: Just so you know, we're out here ( "Construction: a boys club," July 13). I own and operate a 1.5-woman electrical contracting firm. I'm not sure if I'll make it, but I've been in business four years. I am listed as a Disadvantaged Business Enterprise by the Office of Minority and Women Business Enterprises, but it does me no good because I'm so small. Your article is not news, and from what I hear they are taking away the quotas for women.
NEWS
December 11, 2000
Investment firm from Columbia opens office in California Optical Capital Group, a Columbia-based firm that invests in optical networking technology companies, has announced the opening of a San Francisco office. The office is directed by Max Straube, who joined the company as president and managing director of private equity, along with Dick Filippini, who serves as associate director of private equity. The office was opened to help identify strategic opportunities on the West Coast.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2003
New Positions Reed, Murphy are named to posts at Performax Performax has named Scott Reed director of communications and Christie Murphy director of marketing for the Baltimore-based health and benefits plans development, administrator and managerial firm. Reed will have responsibility for internal and external communications development, strategy and supervision. A graduate of the University of Maryland, he was formerly with Health Care Strategies Inc. Murphy, previously with CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, is an MBA graduate of Loyola College.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1997
New trade group is created for Md. contractorsA new nonprofit trade association has been formed to serve Maryland's construction industry.Licensed Contractors of Maryland is offering membership to all of Maryland's more than 40,000 contractors with state construction licenses or specific trade licenses from the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation.The new association's primary function is to present a comprehensive industry view on proposed legislation and regulations dealing with licensed contractors.
NEWS
October 7, 1993
2 architects finish state requirementsMarilee Tortorelli and Pam Davison of John E. Harms Jr. and Associates recently completed requirements for becoming registered landscape architects in Maryland.Ms. Davison is the senior planner within the land planning division at Harms and Associates, which is based in Pasadena.Ms. Tortorelli manages the Land planning division.Gardiner to chair membership driveFrancis E. Gardiner Jr. president of Gardiner and Gardiner Inc. has been named area chairman to the Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC)
BUSINESS
By Elliott A. Wiley Jr. and Elliott A. Wiley Jr.,Special to Baltimoresun.com | April 12, 2004
Kent Thomas is the new president of the Building Congress & Exchange Foundation in Baltimore. The nonprofit organization develops educational and public-awareness programs for the region's construction industry. Since its inception in 1998, the foundation has awarded $25,000 a year to construction-education programs in the Baltimore area. Thomas will serve a one-year term as president. BCEF works under the auspices of KAWG&F, a public accounting firm based in Towson. Thomas is co-chairman of the firm's construction services practice group.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | October 1, 2009
A national contractors group is calling for tax breaks, federal investments in highway and water projects and other measures to pull the construction industry from a "depression," boost the overall economy and stem the past year's loss of construction jobs throughout the United States, including in Maryland. The Associated General Contractors of America unveiled a plan Wednesday designed to revive the construction industry and reverse expectations that construction will struggle through the next year.
NEWS
July 17, 2014
Barbara A. Res should do her homework regarding alleged employment discrimination against women in the construction industry ( "Construction: a boy's club," July 14). The United Brotherhood of Carpenters recently pointed to a job which maintained 20 percent female employment for the 18-month duration. Times are changing and Ms. Res' incorrect commentary only fuels outdated stereotypes. For more information, you can contact the Prairie Arctic Regional Council of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters.
NEWS
January 21, 2014
I agree that those who care for people with disabilities should earn a living wage ( "Minimum wage debate ignores crucial group," Jan. 15). I have been a direct-care staff worker at the Athelas Institute in Columbia for more than 10 years, yet the new people coming in with no experience make almost as much as I do. I have had experience working with disabled people since I was 19, when my oldest son was born with learning disabilities....
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
For Maryland's building industry, the good times may be coming back. The construction sector, which has been in the tank for the better part of five years, is on the verge of receiving a sizable infusion of money from recent decisions in Annapolis. Much to the chagrin of many Maryland motorists, the General Assembly has approved legislation to charge hundreds of millions of dollars a year in additional gas taxes - money that will build new roads and transit systems. Also heading to Gov. Martin O'Malley's desk is a $1 billion plan to build 15 new schools in Baltimore and renovate three dozen more.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
Ernest T. Davis, a retired construction project manager and a World War II B-24 pilot, died Feb. 13 of heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 92. The son of a civil engineer and a government worker, Ernest Theodore Davis was born in Bemis, Tenn., and later moved with his family to Washington. He was a graduate of Bethesda-Chevy Chase High School and started engineering studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. In 1942, he enlisted in what was then the Army Air Corps, and after completing training as a B-24 Liberator pilot, was assigned to the 8th Air Force in England.
EXPLORE
August 15, 2011
Maryland AGC, the Maryland Chapter of the Associated General Contractors of America, has elected Stella Miller, president and owner of Stella May Contracting, as chairman of the board for the period July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2013. Also elected were Jeffrey Hargrave, president of Mahogany, Inc., as first vice chairman, Steve Crist, vice president of J. H. Hampshire, Inc., as second vice chairman, and Christopher Tripp, heavy civil manager Mid Atlantic for Joseph B. Fay Company, as secretary/treasurer.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | October 1, 2009
A national contractors group is calling for tax breaks, federal investments in highway and water projects and other measures to pull the construction industry from a "depression," boost the overall economy and stem the past year's loss of construction jobs throughout the United States, including in Maryland. The Associated General Contractors of America unveiled a plan Wednesday designed to revive the construction industry and reverse expectations that construction will struggle through the next year.
NEWS
July 18, 2014
Regarding Barbara A. Res' recent commentary on women in the construction industry: Just so you know, we're out here ( "Construction: a boys club," July 13). I own and operate a 1.5-woman electrical contracting firm. I'm not sure if I'll make it, but I've been in business four years. I am listed as a Disadvantaged Business Enterprise by the Office of Minority and Women Business Enterprises, but it does me no good because I'm so small. Your article is not news, and from what I hear they are taking away the quotas for women.
BUSINESS
By James Johnson and James Johnson,McClatchy News Service | February 10, 1991
The construction industry must work to expand and enhance training programs if a serious shortage of skilled workers in the 1990s is to be overcome, a new study concludes.The study, released at the recent convention of the National Association of Home Builders, attributes the predicted shortage to continuing growth in the number of jobs in the industry, coupled with a decline in the number of people available to fill them.California will need 13,236 more carpenters and 5,130 more electricians during that period, according to the study, "An Analysis of America's Construction Work Force and Occupational Projections (1990-1996)
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,chris.guy@baltsun.com | October 16, 2008
After wrangling for nearly a year over development impact fees that supporters say are vital to pay for schools, roads and other services, County Executive John R. Leopold announced a new plan Tuesday aimed at easing a difficult business climate for builders and developers, providing a 20-month reprieve from new fees that could spark hiring and avoid layoffs. Leopold, who calls the plan an economic stimulus, says phasing in the fees would allow the construction industry time to recover from an economic downturn that has brought development to a virtual standstill in recent months.
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