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Construction Delays

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NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 26, 1996
Commuters who use Little Patuxent Parkway in Columbia's Town Center village should expect construction delays for the next two months.C.J. Miller Inc., a Hampstead contractor, will begin $581,000 in construction and landscape work Monday on Little Patuxent Parkway between Vantage Point Road and Sterrett Place. Howard Research and Development (HRD), a Rouse Co. subsidiary, is the sole-source contractor.The work will include resurfacing, repaving, new curbs and gutters and landscaping in the median with brick crosswalks.
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NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | May 6, 2006
After months of delays, the new Baltimore County Detention Center opened yesterday. But even move-in day for the inmates didn't stay on schedule. Despite instructions to bring no more than seven pairs of pants, seven shirts and seven pairs of socks, some inmates overpacked. Correctional officers forced them to discard extra items, pushing back some inmates' arrival until later in the morning. "The Salvation Army or the St. Vincent de Paul Society's going to have a banner day," said James P. O'Neill, the center's chief administrator, referring to the aid organizations.
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NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2001
In an effort to ease the rush-hour backups that clog Interstate 695 in southwestern Baltimore County, the state Department of Transportation has begun a three-year project to widen the outer loop of the Baltimore Beltway's busiest section. The work by the State Highway Administration will include widening and resurfacing nearly three miles of the outer loop from east of Frederick Road to Interstate 95. "This is one of the toughest sections of the Beltway we have," said Parker F. Williams, head of the State Highway Administration.
NEWS
By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2005
As schools across the state opened their doors for the start of a new school year yesterday, some youngsters got more than just new teachers and books - they also got brand new classrooms. About 550 of Baltimore County's 108,000 students arrived at Woodholme Elementary in Pikesville yesterday. The new tan-brick school with celery-colored awnings sits on 10 acres on Mount Wilson Lane near Reisterstown Road. Experienced view While many of the younger pupils were just pleased - or scared - to be at school and didn't seem too impressed by the new building, some older students evaluated the school's windows, colors and technology.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2002
A temporary ice skating rink at The Mall in Columbia has opened after more than eight weeks of construction delays, but it now is a financial burden, the owners claim. Mall management had hoped the facility would attract families and help sluggish sales at the mall's new entertainment plaza. Rink owners say they hope to draw customers as the year's busiest shopping season grinds to a halt, and they would like to stay longer, if mall management allows. Lance Curran, a partner in Tri-State Ice Management, said the company has proposed building a permanent facility at the mall that could be used for other activities during warm months.
NEWS
August 30, 1993
Harford County schools open before Labor Day this year, for the first time in history. But not for 800 students of Fallston Middle School whose new building is unfinished, with fire safety defects.Last year, authorities put them in the adjacent Fallston High School. This year, the students will start school two weeks late. The delay could be longer, if the state fire marshal doesn't approve. The health department also noted unfixed problems. Contractor Triangle Construction Co. was to have finished the $14 million job July 15.The fiasco is a rebuke to the insistence of Superintendent Ray R. Keech that Harford schools start a week earlier than usual.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | April 24, 1991
YOU CAN TALK all you want about spotting the first robin or the crocuses blooming, but to me the official harbingers of spring are the colorful "Construction ahead" signs that dot every highway in the land.Spring means the familiar smell of exhaust fumes as dump trucks, their suspension sagging under two tons of fill, wheeze into a construction site on the interstate that's causing a 10-mile backup.Spring means the deafening roar of huge John Deere front-end loaders moving mountains of earth and narrowly missing the windshield of my car with their bucket.
NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | May 6, 2006
After months of delays, the new Baltimore County Detention Center opened yesterday. But even move-in day for the inmates didn't stay on schedule. Despite instructions to bring no more than seven pairs of pants, seven shirts and seven pairs of socks, some inmates overpacked. Correctional officers forced them to discard extra items, pushing back some inmates' arrival until later in the morning. "The Salvation Army or the St. Vincent de Paul Society's going to have a banner day," said James P. O'Neill, the center's chief administrator, referring to the aid organizations.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield | July 7, 1991
Ten Reasons Not to Build the Proposed Severn River Bridge:10) Maryland Functional Math Test Scores will go down, since many young Annapolitans learn to count while watching the masts roll by.9) Hey -- fishing should be a spectator sport.8) The drawbridge provides busy people a chance to catch up on their latest hate letters from Governor Schaefer.7) Gridlock really is God's way of bringing people closer together.6) Your business is failing and you're in no big hurry to get to work anyway.
NEWS
By Mike Rood and Mike Rood,State News Service | September 27, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Maryland Gov. William Donald Schaefer has joined the chorus of frustration over federal budget negotiations, saying job furloughs faced next week by many of the state's 265,000 federal employees will cause them financial problems and will harm local economies."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2005
Two men have been ordered to repay the Anne Arundel County school system $150,196, after they pleaded guilty to setting a fire in September at Marley Elementary School that delayed the school's opening until last week. Joseph Anthony Molineiro and Charles Edward Sawyer, both 21, pleaded guilty recently to second-degree arson in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court, prosecutors said yesterday. Lesser charges were dropped. The Glen Burnie men were sentenced to five years in prison, with all of that time suspended except for one year of house arrest.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2004
Creating a slice of an Australian river canyon in the middle of the Inner Harbor is proving more difficult than expected, forcing the National Aquarium in Baltimore to delay the opening of its massive expansion and miss out on the busiest part of the city's tourist season. Delays in construction and the complexity of the $66 million project mean the more than 65,000-square- foot building won't open until at least the fall of next year - six months or more beyond the original goal of this spring.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2004
The Maryland Jockey Club announced yesterday that the 19th annual Maryland Million Day program will be shifted from Laurel Park to Pimlico Race Course, which re-opens for live racing today after a seven-week lull. Delays in construction at Laurel caused by the recent rainy weather prompted the change, bringing the Maryland Million to Baltimore for the eighth time. "After consulting with the Maryland Million officials and the local horsemen, we felt this was the best move," said Lou Raffetto, chief operating officer of the Maryland Jockey Club.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2004
Baltimore's long-awaited visitor center will not open in time for the Orioles' home opener next month as planned, but it will make its debut May 7 - a banner weekend for tourism events in the city. "We've always wanted to have the building open as soon as possible, but Mother Nature didn't cooperate," said Nancy Hinds, a spokeswoman for the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association. "However, the May 7th opening presents us with a tremendous opportunity to build on the momentum created by the other events going on that weekend."
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Laurie Willis and Jeff Barker and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2003
The state opened a new juvenile detention center in Baltimore yesterday that child advocates hope will relieve crowding at other holding facilities where city youths have long been sent. The $45 million Baltimore City Juvenile Justice Center on North Gay Street at Fallsway will house a maximum of 144 youths awaiting court dates. Construction delays pushed back the opening, originally scheduled for 2001. The new building means Baltimore juveniles won't regularly have to be sent to facilities outside the area, where they are far from their families and lawyers.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2003
Construction on an elementary school in Mount Airy could be delayed because town officials refuse to sign a required grading permit until county leaders promise to make road improvements around the planned school site. County officials say they have agreed to consider those improvements but are waiting for the Town Council to provide a specific wish list. School officials say they're stuck - unable to give the Town Council what it wants and unable to begin building a facility that Mount Airy desperately needs.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Sun Staff Writer | March 24, 1994
A glass-enclosed aircraft observation lounge planned for Baltimore-Washington International Airport has been delayed at the departure gate because bids on the project came in 50 percent to 75 percent higher than a contract engineer estimated it would cost."
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2004
Creating a slice of an Australian river canyon in the middle of the Inner Harbor is proving more difficult than expected, forcing the National Aquarium in Baltimore to delay the opening of its massive expansion and miss out on the busiest part of the city's tourist season. Delays in construction and the complexity of the $66 million project mean the more than 65,000-square- foot building won't open until at least the fall of next year - six months or more beyond the original goal of this spring.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Ivan Penn and Stephanie Desmon and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2003
State Comptroller William Donald Schaefer said yesterday that he will support the $26 million expansion of the House of Delegates' office building, clearing one major hurdle in a project beset by construction delays and potential political and budgetary problems. He wants to make sure, however, that the annex to the Lowe House Office Building doesn't turn into a "Taj Mahal," a not-so-veiled reference to the extravagant Senate office building that opened in 2001. With Schaefer's support - and that of state Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp - the project has the necessary majority on the state's Board of Public Works to get the final go-ahead.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2002
A temporary ice skating rink at The Mall in Columbia has opened after more than eight weeks of construction delays, but it now is a financial burden, the owners claim. Mall management had hoped the facility would attract families and help sluggish sales at the mall's new entertainment plaza. Rink owners say they hope to draw customers as the year's busiest shopping season grinds to a halt, and they would like to stay longer, if mall management allows. Lance Curran, a partner in Tri-State Ice Management, said the company has proposed building a permanent facility at the mall that could be used for other activities during warm months.
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