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Construction Debris

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NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 1, 1999
City officials intervened yesterday in a continuing dispute over a clean fill at Gwynns Falls Park, refusing to grant a permit to expand the dumping area until the contractor irons out a compromise with local residents.Zack Germroth, a spokesman of the Housing Department, said the city is acting as a liaison between area communities and Baltimore's Potts and Callahan Inc., which has been dumping construction debris in the park's 4-acre quarry since August."We will meet in some fashion before people see the final memorandum of understanding," Germroth said.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2013
Several drivers passing beneath an Interstate 95 overpass near White Marsh got an unwelcome surprise Christmas Eve morning when construction debris fell from the highway, damaging their vehicles. No one was injured in the incident, but four vehicles were damaged, according to the Maryland Transportation Authority, which was conducting the construction. About 8:40 a.m., an MdTA construction crew was cutting metal on the I-95 overpass above Campbell Boulevard, in the Nottingham area of Baltimore County, as part of the authority's ongoing construction of express toll lanes in the area, said Becky Freeberger, a MdTA spokeswoman.
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NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1999
Tons of scarred brick, bent nails and other construction leftovers could vanish from the county's Northern Landfill if Carroll officials adopt a new process for handling construction and demolition debris. Gary Horst, the county's director of enterprise and recreation services, has received permission from the County Commissioners to seek state approval for the proposal to recycle construction debris into a material that would be used in building roads and parking lots. "Wood, concrete and old asphalt would be sorted and processed at our facility, where we would find new outlets for that material," said Monty Davison, general manager of Partners Quality Recycling Services Inc., the Baltimore company that has submitted the proposal.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan | April 22, 2007
A 44-year-old Owings Mills man was arrested and charged last week in connection with the illegal dumping of more than 100 pounds of construction debris in Upton, officials said yesterday. Tommy Ray Whitehead was arrested Wednesday while at District Court on Patapsco Avenue for another illegal dumping case, city officials said. In the most recent case, police have accused Whitehead of dumping debris in a community garden in the 1200 block of Shields Place. The Sun reported last month that a huge pile of debris - including a brown house door, insulation resembling pink cotton candy and planks of wood and bricks - was left in a grassy alleyway on Shields Place that had been converted into a community garden.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF Sun staff researchers Dee Lyon, Paul McCardell, Jean Packard, Robert Schrott and Susie Waters contributed to this article | October 9, 1996
The Glendening administration has slowed state efforts to control pollution from construction debris landfills, a move that critics say benefits landfill operators who contributed to Gov. Parris N. Glendening in his election campaign.The administration last fall withdrew rules that were about to be imposed on so-called rubble landfills to prevent ground water contamination. The rules had been developed under the administration of Gov. William Donald Schaefer in response to complaints from people who live near landfills.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | April 17, 1994
If the earth hadn't collapsed under Wendell and Patricia Hart's driveway and under the pine trees along one side of their property, the couple might never have found out that Carroll County allows builders to bury construction debris on home sites.The Harts were lucky that no cars were in the driveway of their home near Winfield when the sinkhole opened and that neighborhood children didn't fall into the 12-foot-deep fissure at the side property line."If a pet or child had gone down into [the fissure]
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | December 5, 1994
Carroll County officials say they were surprised to learn two months ago that the state had declared in 1988 that it was illegal for builders to bury stumps and other construction debris at new house sites."
NEWS
October 27, 1997
GOV. PARRIS N. GLENDENING warns that Maryland is becoming the "dumping grounds" for out-of-state construction debris because the cost of dumping in Maryland is less expensive than in surrounding states. Although new, tougher environmental standards may douse the incentive to import rubble here, the Anne Arundel County Council did the right thing this month by not including the much-debated Chesapeake Terrace rubble landfill in its Solid Waste Management Plan. The council recognized that many issues remain unsettled about the proposal.
NEWS
June 28, 1994
Imagine walking out to pick up the morning paper and discovering a gaping hole in your driveway. Or mowing your grass and having the wheel of your mower swallowed up by the earth. Or watching your children dodge a 10-foot pit as they play ball in the yard.A number of home owners in Carroll don't have to imagine any of these possibilities; they have experienced them. In the past four years, 52 of the 300 sinkholes reported to the county's Bureau of Water Resource Management were created by decaying construction debris that was buried by home builders.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | February 27, 1995
Maryland's Department of the Environment has dropped its effort to make an Eldersburg builder remove tree stumps and other construction debris that he buried on a subdivision lot.The state agency rescinded its complaint after builder Michael Reeves told department officials that he had county government permission to bury leftover construction materials, tree stumps and limbs on a lot in Homedale subdivision. Mr. Reeves and developer Henry L. Blevins are completing the 40-year-old subdivision on Klee Mill Road in South Carroll County.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | April 1, 2007
Admiring a trout caught yesterday on the unofficial opening day of the season, I was struck by the resemblance to certain members of Maryland's Senate. They have their mouths open and nothing comes out. It was a beautiful morning to knock the rust off fishing skills, and thousands of anglers did so, from the Gunpowder River to Severn Run to Northwest Branch. Lots of folks stumbled out of bed in darkness to be streamside at the 5:30 a.m. start of the so-called "put-and-take" trout season.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1999
Tons of scarred brick, bent nails and other construction leftovers could vanish from the county's Northern Landfill if Carroll officials adopt a new process for handling construction and demolition debris. Gary Horst, the county's director of enterprise and recreation services, has received permission from the County Commissioners to seek state approval for the proposal to recycle construction debris into a material that would be used in building roads and parking lots. "Wood, concrete and old asphalt would be sorted and processed at our facility, where we would find new outlets for that material," said Monty Davison, general manager of Partners Quality Recycling Services Inc., the Baltimore company that has submitted the proposal.
NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 1, 1999
City officials intervened yesterday in a continuing dispute over a clean fill at Gwynns Falls Park, refusing to grant a permit to expand the dumping area until the contractor irons out a compromise with local residents.Zack Germroth, a spokesman of the Housing Department, said the city is acting as a liaison between area communities and Baltimore's Potts and Callahan Inc., which has been dumping construction debris in the park's 4-acre quarry since August."We will meet in some fashion before people see the final memorandum of understanding," Germroth said.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1998
Dumping of construction debris has begun at the former Gwynns Falls quarry, alarming Southwest Baltimore residents who are threatening to sue the city over the matter.In December, the city issued a permit to Potts and Callahan Inc. of Baltimore to dump concrete, bricks, dirt, sand and asphalt at 2900 W. Baltimore St. But neighborhood groups claim that the city pledged to meet with them before allowing the dumping to begin.Residents living near the park are worried that the site will be turned into a landfill, harming the surrounding 2,000 acres of city parkland.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | July 5, 1998
YOU HAVE YOUR project planned, your contractor selected, and your contract signed; so now you're ready to start the work, right?No, not quite. There are still a few things that need to take place.Before anything else, you must work with the contractor to develop a schedule that will let all concerned know what will happen when.Besides allowing the many tradesmen and suppliers to plan when they will do their work or deliver their materials, the schedule allows you to plan your life around the construction.
NEWS
October 27, 1997
GOV. PARRIS N. GLENDENING warns that Maryland is becoming the "dumping grounds" for out-of-state construction debris because the cost of dumping in Maryland is less expensive than in surrounding states. Although new, tougher environmental standards may douse the incentive to import rubble here, the Anne Arundel County Council did the right thing this month by not including the much-debated Chesapeake Terrace rubble landfill in its Solid Waste Management Plan. The council recognized that many issues remain unsettled about the proposal.
NEWS
February 8, 1991
For several years now, Christmas tree farmer James Jett has made a nice profit by allowing parts of his 220-acre farm, at Dogwood and Wrights Mill roads, to be used as a dump. Up to 100 tractor-trailers a day ferried tree stumps and construction debris to the site near Patapsco State Park, infuriating neighbors alarmed by the heavy traffic. But until a fire was detected at the dump early last Saturday, the problem was strictly a local one.By early Monday morning, dense smoke from Mr. Jett's farm reached downtown neighborhoods -- some 15 miles away -- setting off smoke detectors and puzzling sleepy residents.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan | April 22, 2007
A 44-year-old Owings Mills man was arrested and charged last week in connection with the illegal dumping of more than 100 pounds of construction debris in Upton, officials said yesterday. Tommy Ray Whitehead was arrested Wednesday while at District Court on Patapsco Avenue for another illegal dumping case, city officials said. In the most recent case, police have accused Whitehead of dumping debris in a community garden in the 1200 block of Shields Place. The Sun reported last month that a huge pile of debris - including a brown house door, insulation resembling pink cotton candy and planks of wood and bricks - was left in a grassy alleyway on Shields Place that had been converted into a community garden.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF Sun staff researchers Dee Lyon, Paul McCardell, Jean Packard, Robert Schrott and Susie Waters contributed to this article | October 9, 1996
The Glendening administration has slowed state efforts to control pollution from construction debris landfills, a move that critics say benefits landfill operators who contributed to Gov. Parris N. Glendening in his election campaign.The administration last fall withdrew rules that were about to be imposed on so-called rubble landfills to prevent ground water contamination. The rules had been developed under the administration of Gov. William Donald Schaefer in response to complaints from people who live near landfills.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1995
It is a question that has puzzled farmers for centuries and inspired a popular nursery rhyme. How does your garden grow?Scientists at the federal Agricultural Research Center in Beltsville are looking at ground-up construction materials, crab shells or refuse from hotels, restaurants and shopping centers as an answer. They have set up the National Composting Center to figure out what types of trash help make healthy flowers, vegetables and shrubs."These materials are filling up the landfills, so why not put them to good use?"
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