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NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Annapolis Bureau | April 12, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The General Assembly is praising the $350 million public construction budget as one of the leanest in years, but fat is still a relative term in the State House.The legislature did lop off many of the "pork barrel" projects that traditionally crowd the construction budget before it took a final vote late Friday."I think it's the most pristine budget I've seen in a long while," said House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr., a Kent County Democrat.But two proposed projects -- an intensive care unit for newborns in Baltimore and a minor-league baseball stadium in Bowie -- illustrate the trouble lawmakers had trimming the "fat" and deciding which projects were truly worthy.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2011
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said Thursday afternoon that his school construction requests for the fiscal year starting this summer recognize the need for spending restraint in difficult times, but he said the same economic challenges "make the education of our future work force and leaders more important than ever," according to his prepared remarks. The executive's annual message to the 15-member planning board on capital spending for 2012 offered highlights of a $670 million spending plan.
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NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | April 11, 1995
In an attempt to keep up with expanding pupil enrollment, the General Assembly voted yesterday to spend more than a quarter of the state's $390 million construction budget to build and renovate public schools.Next year's capital construction budget, to be financed through the sale of state general obligation bonds, also includes $48 million for a new prison south of Cumberland, $12 million for a District Court and multiservice center in Annapolis, and millions more for hospitals, universities, jails, parks, museums and sewage treatment plants.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | April 5, 2009
Ellicott City and Elkridge would be the biggest beneficiaries of the $392 million capital budget proposed by Howard County Executive Ken Ulman. The major renovation of Mount Hebron High School in Ellicott City would get another $16.5 million, Northfield Elementary would get an $11.1 million makeover into a certified "green" building, and the big new Miller library on Frederick Road would get $14.5 million to complete construction. That's not all. A temporary $4.1 million fire station would be built at the county's Mayfield Highway shop, and money to plan an addition to Bellows Spring Elementary also is included in the plan Ulman unveiled Wednesday.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1999
With little debate, the Anne Arundel school board approved Superintendent Carol S. Parham's $55 million construction budget yesterday, the first step in her plans addressing redistricting and crowding for the next two decades.The board unanimously approved the capital spending proposal and voted to move construction of a new Seven Oaks Elementary School higher on the list of priorities.It also set aside about $900,000 so that planning for the school can begin in 2001 instead of 2006. Seven Oaks would be completed in 2004 instead of 2009.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2001
Baltimore City and fast-growing Howard and Frederick counties emerged yesterday as big winners in next year's $295 million school construction budget as Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced the final $99 million worth of projects. The money brings total state spending on school construction since Glendening took office to nearly $1.5 billion - putting him within easy striking distance of the $1.6 billion goal he set early in his administration. "We're going to absolutely shatter that goal," the governor said.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Sun Staff Writer | September 8, 1994
Traditionally, the Anne Arundel County school system's requests for money to build schools or fix them have been extensive wish lists, ridiculed by the County Council. No more.The $36.6 million construction budget presented to the board yesterday by Superintendent Carol S. Parham has, she says, "an element of credibility.""With my staff I believe that we have come up with a better approach to this annual effort, and that we have approached the process with renewed care, deliberation and, yes, creativity," Dr. Parham told the eight board members.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer Staff writer Mary Maushard contributed to this report | April 22, 1993
State officials yesterday approved $42 million to fund 60 school construction and renovation projects throughout Maryland, part of one of the largest budgets since the 1970s.The Board of Public Works earmarked the money for public school projects in Baltimore and 14 counties, including Baltimore, Anne Arundel and Howard.The money brings the school construction budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1 to $87 million.The governor put $60 million for school construction into his proposed budget and the legislature, citing a backlog in needs, added $20 million to that.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1996
When arguments to improve the economy or please a Very Important Person failed, state legislators resorted to begging as they tried to slip a favorite project into a $400 million construction budget last weekend."
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | October 8, 1993
There may not be an addition to Broadneck Senior High School or a new Meade Area Middle School next year after all, say county officials examining the Anne Arundel Board of Education's proposed $88.4 million construction budget.Both projects are desperately needed, school planners say, to keep up with the influx of new students in those areas.But with $5.4 million already committed to converting the former Andover High School building in Linthicum to a middle school -- money earmarked for the project this year, but used instead to build a new Solley Elementary -- the tab for repairs to existing buildings alone hits $24.2 million.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | January 16, 2007
Gov.-elect Martin O'Malley promised yesterday that his first annual budget will include $400 million for school construction, a commitment he made during the first-ever Maryland Youth Inaugural, held at St. John's College in Annapolis. "We're making news," said O'Malley, perched on a stool with Lt. Gov.-elect Anthony G. Brown by his side in the school's auditorium. "Don't tell the press this tonight. We don't want them to know until we reveal our budget. ...
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2005
With no more new schools planned in Howard County beyond 2007, education officials are still projecting four buildings to be over 115 percent of capacity in 2009 -- but an impatient County Council is pressing for a plan to eliminate all crowded schools. "If we come around to budget season again next year and that list of long-range capital projects looks empty, and we're still projecting schools over 115 percent, I'm not going to vote for your budget," council Chairman Guy Guzzone warned David C. Drown, the school system's demographer.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2004
When County Executive James M. Harkins signs off on Harford's new budget in coming weeks, it will mark the launch of the county's most extensive school construction program in more than a decade. "I can't remember a time when we had two major school construction projects under way at the same time," said John J. O'Neill Jr., director of administration. "And I've been here for 13 years. I don't think it has ever happened before." O'Neill was referring to money in the budget for the start of work on the new Patterson Mill middle and high school complex near Bel Air and a major renovation of 50-year-old North Harford High School in Pylesville.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2001
Baltimore City and fast-growing Frederick County joined Howard yesterday as big winners in next year's $295 million school construction budget as Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced his spending priorities across the state. The money brings total spending on school construction since Glendening took office to nearly $1.5 billion - putting him within easy striking distance of the $1.6 billion goal he set early in his administration. "We're going to absolutely shatter that goal," the governor said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2001
Baltimore City and fast-growing Howard and Frederick counties emerged yesterday as big winners in next year's $295 million school construction budget as Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced the final $99 million worth of projects. The money brings total state spending on school construction since Glendening took office to nearly $1.5 billion - putting him within easy striking distance of the $1.6 billion goal he set early in his administration. "We're going to absolutely shatter that goal," the governor said.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1999
With little debate, the Anne Arundel school board approved Superintendent Carol S. Parham's $55 million construction budget yesterday, the first step in her plans addressing redistricting and crowding for the next two decades.The board unanimously approved the capital spending proposal and voted to move construction of a new Seven Oaks Elementary School higher on the list of priorities.It also set aside about $900,000 so that planning for the school can begin in 2001 instead of 2006. Seven Oaks would be completed in 2004 instead of 2009.
NEWS
December 2, 1990
Not what you call the world's best timing: Tax reform must 0) fight recession fearsFear of the economic slump could decisively affect some of the state government's most cherished initiatives, and officials were trying hard to sell them to a skeptical public and lawmakers.Topping the list was the Commission on State Taxes and Tax Structure, which unanimously approved its final report. Members the commission said they hoped to sell their recommendations to a reluctant General Assembly and the public as tax relief, even though the proposals would raise $807 million in new tax revenue next year alone.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
School Superintendent Carol S. Parham unveiled a $55 million construction and repair budget yesterday that included money for two high school additions needed to carry out her redistricting and crowding-reduction plan over the next two decades. The budget contains $12 million more than last year's capital budget. It must be approved by the school board and County Council. Parham's fiscal 2001 capital budget buttresses her $27 million plan for eventually easing all building crunches.
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