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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | June 24, 1993
BERLIN -- Germany's Constitutional Court rejected yesterday a bid to halt the deployment of German troops to Somalia, ruling unanimously that German troops now in Somalia can stay until Parliament decides whether to support their presence.The Kohl government had argued that Germany's reputation as a trustworthy ally was on the line.The opposition Social Democratic Party (SPD) had asked the high court in Karlsruhe for an injunction banning the deployment under the United Nations flag as a violation of the 1949 German Constitution, which is generally seen as severely restricting the sending of German soldiers outside NATO's area.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 4, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Rep. William J. Jefferson, the Louisiana Democrat under indictment on corruption charges, won a partial victory in court yesterday as an appellate tribunal ruled that federal agents went too far when they searched his office last year. The FBI agents violated the Constitution when they viewed legislative papers in Jefferson's Capitol Hill office, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruled, citing a principle that goes back hundreds of years, to the time of all-powerful English monarchs.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 2, 2005
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- South Africa's highest court ruled yesterday that same-sex marriages have the same legal status as those between men and women, effectively making the nation one of five worldwide that have removed legal barriers to gay unions. The Constitutional Court, as the high court is known, effectively stayed its ruling for one year to give the Parliament time to amend a 1961 marriage law to reflect its decision. If the legislature balks, the court said, the law will be automatically changed to make its provisions gender-neutral.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 19, 2007
ROME -- The first trial involving one of the Bush administration's most controversial counterterrorism practices was put on hold yesterday by an Italian judge who decided to await a higher court's ruling on challenges to the case. The decision was a setback for prosecutors attempting to try 26 Americans, many of them CIA agents, for snatching a radical Muslim cleric off the streets of Milan in 2003 and transporting him to his native Egypt, where he has said he was tortured. The Americans are being tried in absentia in the case that has focused a spotlight on the practice known as "extraordinary rendition," in which terror suspects are captured by U.S. agents in a foreign country and transported to a third, where they are interrogated.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 4, 1993
MOSCOW -- Two days after President Boris N. Yeltsin issued a decree to suspend Vice President Aleksandr V. Rutskoi from office, the Russian Parliament voted yesterday to suspend the president's decree and threw the issue of Mr. Rutskoi's status to the Constitutional Court.The standoff over Mr. Rutskoi's suspension is another example of the political paralysis gripping Moscow as Mr. Yeltsin and his antagonists in the Supreme Soviet, or legislature, prepare for a showdown this fall over the president's call for early parliamentary elections.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | October 1, 1992
MOSCOW -- Mikhail S. Gorbachev may soon find himself LTC hauled into court by an irritated judge who happens to think that no Russian is above the law.Citing "moral reasons," the former Soviet leader has refused to testify in the long-running, landmark case of the Communist Party now being heard in Russia's Constitutional Court.He says he stands on principle. Valery Zorkin, the chief judge, says Mr. Gorbachev stands somewhere else: In contempt of court.Yesterday, Mr. Zorkin said the court may need to compel Mr. Gorbachev to testify, enlisting the aid of the Russian government if necessary.
NEWS
By GWYNNE DYER | July 29, 1992
''Attempts to ban a party of 19 million people because of the crimes of its individual members -- even thousands of them, or tens of thousands -- will be seen throughout the world as an act of barbarity from the Middle Ages.''-- Former Central Committee Secretary Vladimir Kalshnikov, Moscow, 14 July 1992. London -- Actually, there haven't been any street protests against the medieval barbarism of banning the Soviet Communist Party round where I live. On the list of popular civil-rights causes worldwide, Soviet communism ranks 3,245th.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 4, 2005
BERLIN - For the next few weeks, the most closely watched political figure in Germany will be neither the embattled chancellor, Gerhard Schroeder, nor his potential successor, Angela Merkel. It will be a brainy, plain-spoken economist, Horst Koehler, who is the president of Germany - a job that until last week consisted mainly of ceremonial chores like handing out trophies after soccer matches or chatting with Queen Elizabeth at state dinners. On Friday, Schroeder maneuvered to lose a vote of confidence in parliament.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 19, 2007
ROME -- The first trial involving one of the Bush administration's most controversial counterterrorism practices was put on hold yesterday by an Italian judge who decided to await a higher court's ruling on challenges to the case. The decision was a setback for prosecutors attempting to try 26 Americans, many of them CIA agents, for snatching a radical Muslim cleric off the streets of Milan in 2003 and transporting him to his native Egypt, where he has said he was tortured. The Americans are being tried in absentia in the case that has focused a spotlight on the practice known as "extraordinary rendition," in which terror suspects are captured by U.S. agents in a foreign country and transported to a third, where they are interrogated.
NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | March 27, 1993
Russian politicians may be teaching themselves democracy yet. They are carrying on a power struggle by means new and alien. No guns, secret police, arrests in the night, mass demonstrations, troop movements or censorship have come into play, so far.They are hitting each other over the head with constitutional clauses, trying to destroy each other by political means. It's a game they haven't played before. They don't really know the rules, which they make up while going along.The Russians have a constitution written by the Brezhnev dictatorship in 1977, much amended by the Congress of People's Deputies, an elected body which selects a smaller Supreme Soviet as an everyday legislature.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 2, 2005
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- South Africa's highest court ruled yesterday that same-sex marriages have the same legal status as those between men and women, effectively making the nation one of five worldwide that have removed legal barriers to gay unions. The Constitutional Court, as the high court is known, effectively stayed its ruling for one year to give the Parliament time to amend a 1961 marriage law to reflect its decision. If the legislature balks, the court said, the law will be automatically changed to make its provisions gender-neutral.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 4, 2005
BERLIN - For the next few weeks, the most closely watched political figure in Germany will be neither the embattled chancellor, Gerhard Schroeder, nor his potential successor, Angela Merkel. It will be a brainy, plain-spoken economist, Horst Koehler, who is the president of Germany - a job that until last week consisted mainly of ceremonial chores like handing out trophies after soccer matches or chatting with Queen Elizabeth at state dinners. On Friday, Schroeder maneuvered to lose a vote of confidence in parliament.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 29, 2001
LONDON - Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, who ignited a decade of bloody Balkan wars that brought grief to his people and destruction to his country, was handed over to the United Nations War Crimes Tribunal and arrived at The Hague in the Netherlands early today to face charges of crimes against humanity. The extradition left Milosevic poised to become the first former head of state to be tried before the war crimes tribunal, as the international community took its most important step yet in the quest to unravel events and assign blame for the violence and ethnic cleansing that devastated the region.
NEWS
May 28, 1996
IN HANDING a victory to gay rights activists earlier this week, the Supreme Court has not set any broad precedents that would govern other controversial issues involving homosexuals, such as their ability to serve in the military or their right to marry. Instead, it has taken a narrower stand, opposing only the concept that a state could "single out" one group of people in a manner that would, in Justice Anthony Kennedy's words, "deem a class of persons a stranger to its laws."Justice Antonin Scalia, in one of his trademark caustic dissents, accused the majority of taking sides in a culture war, and pointed out the seeming disconnect between this week's decision and a 1986 ruling which upheld a Georgia law making certain homosexual conduct a crime.
NEWS
By Jack Greenberg | July 6, 1995
SOUTH AFRICA'S highest court has unanimously invalidated capital punishment under its post-apartheid constitution. In a departure from the course taken by the U. S. Supreme Court, the South African Constitutional Court invoked its Bill of Rights provisions that prohibit "cruel, inhuman and degrading punishment."Court President Arthur Chaskalson's opinion considered aspects of the death penalty: destruction of life and dignity, both guaranteed in the South African Bill of Rights; arbitrariness of application; possibility of error, and the alternative of life imprisonment as severe punishment.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 4, 1993
MOSCOW -- Two days after President Boris N. Yeltsin issued a decree to suspend Vice President Aleksandr V. Rutskoi from office, the Russian Parliament voted yesterday to suspend the president's decree and threw the issue of Mr. Rutskoi's status to the Constitutional Court.The standoff over Mr. Rutskoi's suspension is another example of the political paralysis gripping Moscow as Mr. Yeltsin and his antagonists in the Supreme Soviet, or legislature, prepare for a showdown this fall over the president's call for early parliamentary elections.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | July 8, 1992
MOSCOW -- Is this a trial or a political convention?The long-awaited showdown over Boris N. Yeltsin's banning of the Communist Party opened in Russia's Constitutional Court yesterday, a solemn event that attracted lobbyists, hangers-on, politicians looking for an audience, American university professors doing the same, elderly red-flag-waving demonstrators, legions of analysts and gangs of reporters. They gathered around TV sets, they gathered around each other, they gathered around the lobby bar (beer only)
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 18, 1992
BONN, Germany -- Chancellor Helmut Kohl announced yesterday that he wants to send up to 1,500 German soldiers to Somalia early next year to help the U.S.-led international relief effort there, the first time since World War II that German ground forces would be sent outside NATO's territorial confines.Deploring endless legalistic discussions about whether the 1949 TC constitution allowed the deployment of German troops beyond NATO territory -- an impasse that prevented Germany from taking part in the military operation against Iraq last year -- Mr. Kohl asked his coalition government yesterday to take action.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | June 24, 1993
BERLIN -- Germany's Constitutional Court rejected yesterday a bid to halt the deployment of German troops to Somalia, ruling unanimously that German troops now in Somalia can stay until Parliament decides whether to support their presence.The Kohl government had argued that Germany's reputation as a trustworthy ally was on the line.The opposition Social Democratic Party (SPD) had asked the high court in Karlsruhe for an injunction banning the deployment under the United Nations flag as a violation of the 1949 German Constitution, which is generally seen as severely restricting the sending of German soldiers outside NATO's area.
NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | March 27, 1993
Russian politicians may be teaching themselves democracy yet. They are carrying on a power struggle by means new and alien. No guns, secret police, arrests in the night, mass demonstrations, troop movements or censorship have come into play, so far.They are hitting each other over the head with constitutional clauses, trying to destroy each other by political means. It's a game they haven't played before. They don't really know the rules, which they make up while going along.The Russians have a constitution written by the Brezhnev dictatorship in 1977, much amended by the Congress of People's Deputies, an elected body which selects a smaller Supreme Soviet as an everyday legislature.
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