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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
Thomas J. "Arky" Vaughan, a retired constable and a Senior Olympian who played basketball for 75 years, died Dec. 19 of a massive stroke at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 85. "Arky was one of the best two-hand set shooters I've ever seen," said Al "Goldy" Goldstein, a retired Baltimore Sun sportswriter who played basketball three times a week with Mr. Vaughan and eight others in the gym of the Bykota Senior Center in Towson. "He was such a good-natured guy. " Born in Baltimore and raised on Cator Avenue, Thomas Joseph Vaughan was a basketball star at Towson Catholic High School and graduated in 1946 from City College.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
Thomas J. "Arky" Vaughan, a retired constable and a Senior Olympian who played basketball for 75 years, died Dec. 19 of a massive stroke at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 85. "Arky was one of the best two-hand set shooters I've ever seen," said Al "Goldy" Goldstein, a retired Baltimore Sun sportswriter who played basketball three times a week with Mr. Vaughan and eight others in the gym of the Bykota Senior Center in Towson. "He was such a good-natured guy. " Born in Baltimore and raised on Cator Avenue, Thomas Joseph Vaughan was a basketball star at Towson Catholic High School and graduated in 1946 from City College.
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NEWS
June 3, 2005
On May 31, 2005, ELIZABETH W. (nee Whedbee) CONSTABLE; beloved wife of the late George Webb Constable; mother of Eleanor C. Reade, George W. Constable, Jr., James W. Constable, Elizabeth C. von Kessler, Isabelle C. Joffrion, Lucinda C. Ballard and Robert A. Constable; survived by nineteen grandchildren, sixteen great-grandchildren, one brother, T. Courtenay Jenkins Whedbee and many nieces and nephews. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at St. Mary's Seminary, 5400 Roland Avenue, on Friday, June 3, at 11 A.M. Interment following at St. James Episcopal Church Cemetery, Monkton.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
James C. Constable, a retired businessman and World War II veteran, died March 7 of heart failure at his Essex, Conn., home. He was 96. James Cheston Constable, the son of the founder of the Baltimore law firm Wright, Constable & Skeen and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. One of his ancestors, James Black Groome of Elkton, had been a U.S. senator and was governor of Maryland from 1874 to 1876. Mr. Constable, who was known as Cheston, attended Gilman School and graduated in 1935 from the old Tome School in Port Deposit.
NEWS
July 31, 2007
On July 29, 2007, BEVERLY "JERRY" , CONSTABLE, U.S. Army Veteran; beloved husband of the late Bonna Mary Constable; loving father of Michael Constable and wife Dwin, Patrice Carter and husband Donald, Deborah Constable, Pamela Ballard and husband Robert and the late Bonna Sullivan; dear brother of Janet Sipe; cherished grandfather of nine grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. Family and friends will honor Beverly's life at the family owned Evans Funeral Chapel and Cremation Services-3 Newport Dr., (Rts 23 & 24 Forest Hill)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2002
George W. Constable Sr., former partner in the Baltimore law firm of Wright, Constable & Skeen and longtime board member of area educational, religious and cultural institutions, died Saturday of heart failure at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. He was 90. Mr. Constable, who lived for nearly 50 years at Harmony Hall, a 125-acre farm in Monkton, was born into a family of lawyers and judges who had practiced law in Maryland since the 1830s. He began his nearly 60-year legal career with the Baltimore firm of Venable, Baetjer & Howard in 1936, after graduation from Yale University Law School.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2005
Elizabeth W. Constable, an avid gardener and a founder and trustee of the Harvey Smith Ladew Foundation that administers the Ladew home and its famous topiary gardens, died of heart failure Tuesday at Harmony Hall, her 125-acre Monkton farm and home for more than a half-century. She was 89. Born Elizabeth Whedbee in Baltimore, she was raised at Edgewood, her family's estate on Lake Avenue. She was educated at Notre Dame Preparatory School, Convent of the Sacred Heart in Noroton, Conn.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | March 3, 1991
CHICAGO -- A British police officer on a tour of Chicago's police headquarters left the building's crime lab saying, "I didn't know there were that many weapons in the world."Constable Ian Yarham, who doesn't carry a gun on the job, said there were "shotguns, rifles, all the handguns you could think of. It's incredible."Constable Yarham was one of four British "bobbies" who visited police headquarters recently and left with the impression that a police officer's lot was very different here from in Britain.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau | October 25, 1993
LONDON -- London mourns a slain bobby, and the mourning echoes across the country like a bell tolling for another loss of innocence.Crack cocaine has come to Great Britain. And Patrick Dunne, a community constable on a bike, cycled unarmed into the middle of what now looks like a crack war.Constable Dunne, 44, a well-liked policeman who had once been a math teacher, set out Wednesday night to deal with a domestic dispute in Clapham, a South London neighborhood of brick rowhouses, some seedy, some gentrified.
NEWS
August 29, 2003
On August 27, 2003, EDWIN HACKER, beloved father of Dwin Constable and Leslie Stout, dear brother of Evelyn Alexander, loving grandfather of Mark Constable, Stephen Constable, Anna Kristen Stout, Paul Stout and Kendall Stout, great-grandfather of Emily Caroline Constable, dear friend of Eric Juratovac and his family. Relatives and friends are invited to call at Schimunek Funeral Home of Bel Air, 610 W. MacPhail Rd., at Rte 24, on Friday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M., with a Funeral Service on Saturday at 10 A.M. Interment Parkwood Cemetery.
NEWS
July 31, 2007
On July 29, 2007, BEVERLY "JERRY" , CONSTABLE, U.S. Army Veteran; beloved husband of the late Bonna Mary Constable; loving father of Michael Constable and wife Dwin, Patrice Carter and husband Donald, Deborah Constable, Pamela Ballard and husband Robert and the late Bonna Sullivan; dear brother of Janet Sipe; cherished grandfather of nine grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. Family and friends will honor Beverly's life at the family owned Evans Funeral Chapel and Cremation Services-3 Newport Dr., (Rts 23 & 24 Forest Hill)
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | October 16, 2006
Although the notion of artist-as-rebel may be a cliche, English landscape painter John Constable spent an anxious decade desperately trying to gain admission to his country's prestigious Royal Academy. The son of a prosperous gentleman farmer from the provinces, Constable (1776-1837) frankly wanted to make a splash at the academy's annual 10-week exhibition in London. His goal was to marry and support a family - and he was happy to do so on the academy's conservative terms. CONSTABLE'S GREAT LANDSCAPES: THE SIX-FOOT PAINTINGS runs through Dec. 31 at the National Gallery of Art, Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue, Northwest, Washington, 202-737-4215 or nga.gov
NEWS
June 3, 2005
On May 31, 2005, ELIZABETH W. (nee Whedbee) CONSTABLE; beloved wife of the late George Webb Constable; mother of Eleanor C. Reade, George W. Constable, Jr., James W. Constable, Elizabeth C. von Kessler, Isabelle C. Joffrion, Lucinda C. Ballard and Robert A. Constable; survived by nineteen grandchildren, sixteen great-grandchildren, one brother, T. Courtenay Jenkins Whedbee and many nieces and nephews. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at St. Mary's Seminary, 5400 Roland Avenue, on Friday, June 3, at 11 A.M. Interment following at St. James Episcopal Church Cemetery, Monkton.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2005
Elizabeth W. Constable, an avid gardener and a founder and trustee of the Harvey Smith Ladew Foundation that administers the Ladew home and its famous topiary gardens, died of heart failure Tuesday at Harmony Hall, her 125-acre Monkton farm and home for more than a half-century. She was 89. Born Elizabeth Whedbee in Baltimore, she was raised at Edgewood, her family's estate on Lake Avenue. She was educated at Notre Dame Preparatory School, Convent of the Sacred Heart in Noroton, Conn.
NEWS
August 29, 2003
On August 27, 2003, EDWIN HACKER, beloved father of Dwin Constable and Leslie Stout, dear brother of Evelyn Alexander, loving grandfather of Mark Constable, Stephen Constable, Anna Kristen Stout, Paul Stout and Kendall Stout, great-grandfather of Emily Caroline Constable, dear friend of Eric Juratovac and his family. Relatives and friends are invited to call at Schimunek Funeral Home of Bel Air, 610 W. MacPhail Rd., at Rte 24, on Friday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M., with a Funeral Service on Saturday at 10 A.M. Interment Parkwood Cemetery.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2002
George W. Constable Sr., former partner in the Baltimore law firm of Wright, Constable & Skeen and longtime board member of area educational, religious and cultural institutions, died Saturday of heart failure at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. He was 90. Mr. Constable, who lived for nearly 50 years at Harmony Hall, a 125-acre farm in Monkton, was born into a family of lawyers and judges who had practiced law in Maryland since the 1830s. He began his nearly 60-year legal career with the Baltimore firm of Venable, Baetjer & Howard in 1936, after graduation from Yale University Law School.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | October 16, 2006
Although the notion of artist-as-rebel may be a cliche, English landscape painter John Constable spent an anxious decade desperately trying to gain admission to his country's prestigious Royal Academy. The son of a prosperous gentleman farmer from the provinces, Constable (1776-1837) frankly wanted to make a splash at the academy's annual 10-week exhibition in London. His goal was to marry and support a family - and he was happy to do so on the academy's conservative terms. CONSTABLE'S GREAT LANDSCAPES: THE SIX-FOOT PAINTINGS runs through Dec. 31 at the National Gallery of Art, Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue, Northwest, Washington, 202-737-4215 or nga.gov
BUSINESS
March 10, 1996
Lead poisoning seminar by Wright, Constable, SkeenA free seminar to help property owners comply with the Lead Poisoning Prevention Program Act, which went into effect Feb. 24, is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon March 30 in the law offices of Wright, Constable & Skeen.Seminar presenters will explain the new lead law in detail and offer guidance to help landlords meet its requirements.Wright Constable attorneys Charles Morton, Catherine Bellinger and Tracey King will take part in the presentation.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2000
A Baltimore County Circuit judge will decide whether the owners of one of the county's oldest and best-known farms were within their rights when they turned the 200-year-old property into a horse farm. James S. Riepe, vice chairman at T. Rowe Price Associates Inc., and his wife, Gail, won approval from the county Board of Appeals last year to complete major renovations at Conclusion Farm, in the 1200 block of Gerber Lane in Sparks. But a lawyer for Kenneth T. Bosley, one of the farm's former owners, told Judge James T. Smith Jr. yesterday that the extent of the renovations has damaged the historic significance of the farm, which is listed with the Landmarks Preservation Commission.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1998
William Grumbine, the first borough constable of Westminster, earned 33 1/2 cents for every arrest he made, but only after he was required to post a $100 bond with the city before his appointment in 1839.In Grumbine's day, town ordinances made it illegal to disturb the peace by shouting, maliciously ringing doorbells or throwing stones against any door, fence or gate. Lawbreakers were fined $1 to $5 for such shenanigans.An updated version of such historical tidbits about Westminster Police Department will soon be available on the city's Web page.
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