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NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
Felicia "Snoop" Pearson , 31. Grew up dealing drugs in East Baltimore and at age 14 killed a youth in a fight. On HBO series "The Wire," played an enforcer for drug organization. Arrested last year as part of a drug sweep and pleaded guilty to conspiracy to sell heroin. Put on probation with a suspended sentence. Shawn Johnson. New York drug supplier described by Pearson as an old friend. Pleaded guilty to being the drug network's main supplier, trafficking in 10-kilogram heroin shipments.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2012
A federal court judge on Thursday sentenced 21-year-old Romesh Vance, who was featured in a 2005 documentary about Baltimore boys sent to boarding school in Kenya, to 70 months in prison for participating in a drug conspiracy at the Gilmor Homes public housing complex. "I'm hoping that Mr. Vance will be one of the real success stories," U.S. District Judge Benson E. Legg said in handing down the sentence. Legg noted Vance's youth, "tremendous" family support and the many opportunities he's had in his short life that have shown him better ways of doing things.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2012
A federal indictment unsealed Friday accuses four people — including a mother and her son — of directing a drug-dealing operation in Baltimore's strip-club district through violence and intimidation, including the 2010 killing of a dancer they suspected of giving information to police. Police had arrested one of the defendants named in this week's indictment, Tyrone Johniken, last January in the killing of 25-year-old Cherrie Gammon, who was fatally shot in Leakin Park on Dec. 12, 2010.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2012
Steven "J.R. " Blackwell, the leader of an East Baltimore drug conspiracy linked to a yearlong street warwith rivals, was sentenced to 20 years in federal prison Friday as part of a guilty plea he struck with prosecutors last fall. Though he was not charged with any acts of violence, authorities believe Blackwell's organization is tied to a wave of shootings touched off by the abduction in April 2008 of his then-teenage brothers. But Blackwell, 27, still faced up to life in prison after being charged with overseeing a multimillion-dollar heroin conspiracy and laundering the proceeds through gambling winnings in Las Vegas and state lottery tickets.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2011
A Gwynn Oak man was sentenced Wednesday to 10 years in prison for his role in a conspiracy to sell between 1 and 3 kilograms of heroin, prosecutors said. Recco F. Beaufort, 52, was the principal transporter of heroin for a drug trafficking group that processed and distributed heroin less than 1,000 feet from a charter school, according to a statement from Maryland's U.S. Attorney's Office. Beaufort delivered heroin for a New Jersey man named Charles C. "Billy" Guy, 43, to a Baltimore man named Christian Gettis, 39, the statement said.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2011
After a six-week trial and three days of deliberation, a Maryland jury acquitted Sen. Ulysses S. Currie and two grocery chain executives Tuesday of federal extortion and bribery charges, ending years of criminal suspicion surrounding the Prince George's County Democrat. But the state senator still faces an ethical inquiry by the General Assembly, which could recommend penalties ranging from a reprimand to expulsion. Currie was indicted last year, alongside two former Shoppers Food Warehouse employees, after a lengthy investigation into allegations that they used a community-relations consulting contract to conceal a bribery scheme in which Currie accepted payment in exchange for legislative favors.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2011
Jurors deliberating in the federal bribery trial of state Sen. Ulysses S. Currie and two former grocery chain executives sent a note to the judge Monday, indicating that at least some of them believe a conspiracy may have occurred, though not for the length of time alleged in the indictment. The note read: "If we believe the conspiracy was not in effect in Dec. 2002 (or even Jan. 2003), but might have started at a later date [possibly as much as two years later], can we find any of the defendant's guilty on count one?"
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2011
A 13-year-old Romesh Vance sat on a Baltimore carousel eight years ago, spinning slowly as he predicted his future. "I think all our lives [are] going to be bad now," he said. The statement was captured on camera by the documentary filmmakers following his journey - and its premature end - at the Baraka boarding school in Kenya, which gave a handful of disadvantaged city boys the chance to study in Africa. The school was unexpectedly closed in 2003. On Wednesday, a 21-year-old Vance pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court to participating in a drug conspiracy involving nearly two dozen people who allegedly sold cocaine and crack out of the Gilmor Homes public housing complex.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
A Severna Park mortgage broker pleaded guilty Friday in a mortgage fraud case that left lenders with more than $940,000 in losses, robbed homeowners of at least $1.2 million in home equity and pushed 16 homes into foreclosure, the Maryland U.S. attorney's office said. Mary Anne Dean, 60, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit wire fraud. Charles Donaldson, a loan officer described as her co-conspirator, pleaded guilty last week. The Maryland U.S. attorney's office said Donaldson, 57, recruited homeowners struggling with their mortgages for what he said would be a foreclosure rescue plan: They would sell their homes to investors, remain there as renters for a year or so and then buy the properties back after repairing their finances.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2011
The Baltimore Police Department removed its commander in charge of internal investigations late Monday, a move police sources describe as fallout from last week's indictment of a city police officer on drug charges. Maj. Nathan Warfield, picked in 2009 by Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III to root out corruption within the department, was reassigned a week after Bealefeld said the arrest of Officer Daniel G. Redd proved his agency would not tolerate misconduct. Earlier Monday, The Baltimore Sun had asked the department to comment on pictures posted on Facebook showing Warfield socializing with Redd and a man named Sam Brown, who was also charged this month in a separate heroin distribution conspiracy.
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