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NEWS
By David Horsey | October 23, 2012
In addition to the relentless onslaught of mostly negative ads from the Romney and Obama campaigns and their affiliated super PACs, the good people of Ohio are finding themselves targeted by a right-wing conspiracy maven who is dispensing a DVD that pushes beyond the birthers into a new level of paranoid fantasy. "Dreams From My Real Father" is being sent to a million Ohio voters. The DVD makes the claim that, rather than being the son of a student from Kenya, the president was sired by a communist from Chicago named Frank Marshall Davis.
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NEWS
February 7, 2013
Former Governor Ehrlich's columns are generally a laughable compote of right-wing cliches and Fox News talking points, but in his latest column, Mr. Ehrlich went past mere Republican hackery into fear-mongering, to say nothing of inexcusable wrongness and lack of fact-checking ("The vast left-wing conspiracy" Feb. 3). Mr. Ehrlich would do well to remember that the most powerfully partisan movement of the past five years came not out of the left but from the far right. Does the former governor realize that in ranting about the "mega-meeting of the left's most powerful groups," he could as well be on a diatribe against the Bilderburg Group, or the perennial favorite of those conspiracy theorists with which the esteemed former governor is so careful to not align himself, the Illuminati?
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NEWS
By Gregory Kane | April 21, 1996
WHILE WATCHING the evening news the weekend after Secretary of Commerce Ron Brown was killed in a plane crash, my nephew Joey asked me if I thought Brown's untimely end came about as a result of a conspiracy."
NEWS
By David Horsey | October 23, 2012
In addition to the relentless onslaught of mostly negative ads from the Romney and Obama campaigns and their affiliated super PACs, the good people of Ohio are finding themselves targeted by a right-wing conspiracy maven who is dispensing a DVD that pushes beyond the birthers into a new level of paranoid fantasy. "Dreams From My Real Father" is being sent to a million Ohio voters. The DVD makes the claim that, rather than being the son of a student from Kenya, the president was sired by a communist from Chicago named Frank Marshall Davis.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 1, 1994
The new Japanese coalition government is united against reform and for nothing else.Independent prosecutor Fiske is disappointing the conspiracy theorists who will inevitably respond by locating him at the heart of the conspiracy.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 13, 1993
Just call the team the Baltimore Monuments!First, the CIA provides security to the dictator of Georgia. Then a Georgian officer is appointed chairman of the Joint Chiefs. Conspiracy theorists, form to the right.Getting Serb politicians to promise to leave the mountain is easy. This has nothing to do with whether Serb militia will leave the mountain.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | June 26, 1991
WITH THE deadline for choosing a new Baltimore city schoo superintendent fast approaching, three constituencies are looking over Mayor Schmoke's shoulder as he ponders his options.If Schmoke is listening (as he surely is), he already knows who belongs to which group and how they want the matter resolved. The problem is, there's no way he can satisfy GlennMcNattany one faction without risking alienating the others.I call the three groups the conspiracy theorists, the pragmatists and the fence-sitters.
TOPIC
By Jonathan Weisman | September 12, 1999
EVER SINCE the conflagration that consumed the Branch Davidians at Waco, anti-government conspiracy theorists and more sober critics of federal law enforcement have been darkly asking who sparked the fire. It is, and always has been, the wrong question.The right question is this: Why did approximately 80 people die in a building that offered easy egress, in a fire that offered ample time for escape? That question is far more difficult to dismiss, and the answer to it appears to be hauntingly tragic: Though FBI agents most likely did not spark the inferno, they could very well share in the responsibility for at least some of the deaths.
NEWS
September 11, 2006
About 1 million Marylanders are expected to cast ballots in the primary election tomorrow. That may sound like a lot but it's less than one-third of the state's 3.1 million registered voters. The last significantly higher turnout was in 1994 when the state's Republican and Democratic gubernatorial primaries were closely contested and even then only about 40 percent of voters showed up. Some claim this is because life has become hectic. Others see signs of voter disengagement, a loss of faith in the political system and perhaps even a protest movement, albeit a passive one. None of these rationalizations is satisfactory.
NEWS
February 7, 2013
Former Governor Ehrlich's columns are generally a laughable compote of right-wing cliches and Fox News talking points, but in his latest column, Mr. Ehrlich went past mere Republican hackery into fear-mongering, to say nothing of inexcusable wrongness and lack of fact-checking ("The vast left-wing conspiracy" Feb. 3). Mr. Ehrlich would do well to remember that the most powerfully partisan movement of the past five years came not out of the left but from the far right. Does the former governor realize that in ranting about the "mega-meeting of the left's most powerful groups," he could as well be on a diatribe against the Bilderburg Group, or the perennial favorite of those conspiracy theorists with which the esteemed former governor is so careful to not align himself, the Illuminati?
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | February 17, 2010
If you wake up in the morning with the blues because people treat you mean, you could sing a song about it, or you could shop around for an enormous conspiracy that has denied you your constitutional right to liberty and happiness -- and how about Central Standard Time? What gives the feds the right to set your clock for you? It's tyranny. So you join the Free Time movement. You go to meetings. You tune in "The Bob Glenn Show" every day on Fox for your marching orders and set your clock as you darn well please and feel liberated from lockstep uniformity.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | August 5, 2009
Southern writer Walker Percy liked to poke fun at Ohioans in his novels, just to even things out. "Usually Mississippians and Georgians are getting it from everybody, and Alabamians," he once explained to an interviewer. "So, what's wrong with making smart-aleck remarks about Ohio? Nobody puts Ohio down. Why shouldn't I put Ohio down?" Percy, the genial genius, laughed at his own remark. Now, apparently, it's the Buckeye State's turn to poke back. In a fusillade of pique, Ohio Sen. George Voinovich charged that Southerners are what's wrong with the Republican Party.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | June 26, 2007
The Orioles are back home at Camden Yards tonight and, in a sense, so are the New York Yankees. Maybe not in a literal sense, since the Yankees already have the house that a Baltimore guy named Ruth built, but they have taken up permanent residence in our consciousness in much the same manner their fans regularly take over our ballpark. In a weird psychobabble sort of way, they have become a part of us. This is really nothing new. The fortunes of these two franchises have been intertwined for decades, from the 10-player deal in the 1970s that brought Scott McGregor, Rick Dempsey and Tippy Martinez to the Orioles to the end run the Yankees made around Peter Angelos to steal Mike Mussina to a pair of recent managerial searches that have focused on candidates with those heinous pinstripes running through their backgrounds.
NEWS
September 11, 2006
About 1 million Marylanders are expected to cast ballots in the primary election tomorrow. That may sound like a lot but it's less than one-third of the state's 3.1 million registered voters. The last significantly higher turnout was in 1994 when the state's Republican and Democratic gubernatorial primaries were closely contested and even then only about 40 percent of voters showed up. Some claim this is because life has become hectic. Others see signs of voter disengagement, a loss of faith in the political system and perhaps even a protest movement, albeit a passive one. None of these rationalizations is satisfactory.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | April 13, 2005
THE WASHINGTON Nationals opened a big series in Atlanta on Monday night, but there's a pretty good chance you didn't see the game if you're a cable television subscriber, because the TBS telecast was blacked out in the Baltimore-Washington area. Must be some kind of conspiracy, right? Peter Angelos doesn't want you to see the interloping Nats and he's pulling strings behind the scenes to keep them off the air. What other possible explanation can there be? Actually, a fairly logical one. The blackout didn't have anything to do with the Orioles ... or specifically the Nationals.
FEATURES
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2004
John F. Kerry barely had time to concede the presidential race before the conspiracy theory began circulating. Democratic Underground, a Web site founded in January 2001 "to protest the illegitimate presidency of George W. Bush," immediately questioned how Bush ended up with "a mysterious 5 percent advantage," despite early exit polling that showed Kerry with the lead. In a posting on Salon.com, Mark Crispin Miller, the media critic and professor of communications at New York University, wrote, "First of all, this election was definitely rigged.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | August 15, 2004
NOW THAT Michael Phelps has won the first of a possible eight gold medals, isn't it time to dispense with the ridiculous notion that the expectations surrounding America's top Olympian are more inflated than the Goodyear Blimp? I read Kevin Cowherd's column on that subject the other day, and I have only one thing to say, baby: Seven to go. If you think some of us have lost perspective with regard to Baltimore's brilliant, handsome, invincible, God-like Olympic swimming superstar, then take your defeatist attitude somewhere else.
NEWS
January 18, 2002
BALTIMORE STATE'S Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy is right about one thing. The city's early disposition court -- hated by judges, sabotaged by criminals -- is a failed experiment that doesn't justify its $4.7 million annual cost. But it's a failure for which she shares at least partial blame, as one of the key players in the criminal justice system. Moreover, the court is something the Maryland legislature wished for and funded. Thus, when Ms. Jessamy attacked Mayor Martin O'Malley for the concept's lack of success Tuesday, she was also criticizing its legislative godmother, Sen. Barbara A. Hoffman.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | September 26, 2004
THE RAVENS themselves never had to step back from any ledges. Still, there are a lot more unoccupied ledges around town these days compared to this time last week. One week is all it took for the view to change, for temperatures to drop and for sanity to reign again. Of course, a week in an average NFL season is an eternity, and this one was as long and full of activity. It all worked in the Ravens' favor, which will come as a shock to the local conspiracy theorists -- the hordes who believe the league and much of the universe has it in for this team.
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