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By Catherine Cook | December 30, 1990
WITH CONSPICUOUS CONSUMPTION ON THE DECLINE AND ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS ON THE RISE, THERE'S NEVER BEEN A GREATER VARIETY OF FAUX FURS -- FROM FRANKLY FAKE IN BLAZING BRIGHTS TO NATURAL-LOOKING COPIES OF AUTHENTIC PELTS.
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By DAN RODRICKS and DAN RODRICKS,dan.rodricks@baltsun.com | November 9, 2008
There was a memorable moment in the 1980s, during Ronald Reagan's second term in office, when a person I admired - someone who had worked for John F. Kennedy's election, someone who had taken part in student sit-ins of segregated restaurants, someone who had protested the war in Vietnam and who had worked for Bobby Kennedy's election in 1968 - raised an empty bottle of Robert Mondavi estate-bottled cabernet and bragged that he had paid $200 for it at...
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By Shawn Hubler and Shawn Hubler,Los Angeles Times | April 23, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Wendy Goldberg's Rolls-Royce is in the garage. Her jewels are in the bank. Hard times? Hardly. It's just that one day, "it all began to seem a little bit much," she says.When William Lloyd Davis turned 50 three years ago, 300 people came to his birthday soiree. This year the real estate magnate was feted by just three guests -- his kids. The menu featured osso buco. His wife cooked.Mitchell Cannold used to keep a Mercedes-Benz and a Range Rover in New York and a BMW convertible in Los Angeles.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | December 22, 2003
BOSTON - We now arrive at that annual moment of holiday panic. The seconds are ticking on the last-minute catalogs. You are actually considering paying $15.48 to overnight an $11 paperback. Well, usually when Christmas angst comes around, I say, "Don't blame me, I'm from Massachusetts. Or at least Massachusetts Bay Colony." The same commonwealth that may soon permit gay marriages once banned a Merry Christmas. In the 1640s, mince pies and plum puddings were forbidden. In 1659, the Puritans ruled that celebrating Christmas was a criminal offense.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS and DAN RODRICKS,dan.rodricks@baltsun.com | November 9, 2008
There was a memorable moment in the 1980s, during Ronald Reagan's second term in office, when a person I admired - someone who had worked for John F. Kennedy's election, someone who had taken part in student sit-ins of segregated restaurants, someone who had protested the war in Vietnam and who had worked for Bobby Kennedy's election in 1968 - raised an empty bottle of Robert Mondavi estate-bottled cabernet and bragged that he had paid $200 for it at...
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | October 14, 1990
SAVVY POLITICIANS know the power of symbolic action. Building a shiny image often is more important than actual accomplishments.The danger is that a carefully conceived image can be eroded by the rush of on-going events. It poses big problems for the politician on election day.That accounts for Gov. William Donald Schaefer's concern over his popularity. Yes, as the poll in today's Sun indicates, the governor will have no trouble winning a second term. But it won't be the unprecedented mandate he seeks.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 15, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- Pete Sampras remains too good too be true.He respects umpires, lauds opponents, signs autographs and obliges sponsors. In a more genteel age, none of this would be out of the ordinary. But after the contentious reigns of Jimmy Connors and John McEnroe, after gaudy appearance fees and seven-figure endorsement contracts eroded the game's structure, after the tennis boom and the tennis bust, Sampras still is the refreshing throwback all dressed up in white.Sampras would be excused for showing at least some signs of becoming a spoiled tennis brat surrounded by sycophants.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | December 22, 2003
BOSTON - We now arrive at that annual moment of holiday panic. The seconds are ticking on the last-minute catalogs. You are actually considering paying $15.48 to overnight an $11 paperback. Well, usually when Christmas angst comes around, I say, "Don't blame me, I'm from Massachusetts. Or at least Massachusetts Bay Colony." The same commonwealth that may soon permit gay marriages once banned a Merry Christmas. In the 1640s, mince pies and plum puddings were forbidden. In 1659, the Puritans ruled that celebrating Christmas was a criminal offense.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | July 24, 1991
A caption to a photograph in the Today section yesterday misidentified Brenda Carl Bridges' children. They are Rebecca and Tommy.They should wear bumper stickers, perhaps, to avoid being rear-ended by those who have yet to see the light. "I brake," they should warn, "for real life."They brake to spend time with their kids rather than their clients. To work part- or flex-time rather than full- or overtime. To contribute to their families and communities rather than to their careers and corporations.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Staff Writer Staff writers Jay Apperson and William F. Zorzi Jr. contributed to this article | February 23, 1992
The latest pages in the life ledger of Fred Kolodner read this way:Convicted of sports betting. Estranged from family. Slapped with palimony suit. Disbarred. Charged with practicing law without license. Convicted of stealing from clients. Accused of hiding money from creditors in bankruptcy proceedings.Two weeks ago, a new entry was recorded, the strangest one yet. Arrested in New Jersey at age 66 for practicing medicine without a license.Fred Kolodner may never have risen all that high, but his fall from grace has seemingly been without end.It is now a distant memory, but there was a time when Fred Kolodner's life was full of promise.
FEATURES
By Shawn Hubler and Shawn Hubler,Los Angeles Times | April 23, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Wendy Goldberg's Rolls-Royce is in the garage. Her jewels are in the bank. Hard times? Hardly. It's just that one day, "it all began to seem a little bit much," she says.When William Lloyd Davis turned 50 three years ago, 300 people came to his birthday soiree. This year the real estate magnate was feted by just three guests -- his kids. The menu featured osso buco. His wife cooked.Mitchell Cannold used to keep a Mercedes-Benz and a Range Rover in New York and a BMW convertible in Los Angeles.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Staff Writer Staff writers Jay Apperson and William F. Zorzi Jr. contributed to this article | February 23, 1992
The latest pages in the life ledger of Fred Kolodner read this way:Convicted of sports betting. Estranged from family. Slapped with palimony suit. Disbarred. Charged with practicing law without license. Convicted of stealing from clients. Accused of hiding money from creditors in bankruptcy proceedings.Two weeks ago, a new entry was recorded, the strangest one yet. Arrested in New Jersey at age 66 for practicing medicine without a license.Fred Kolodner may never have risen all that high, but his fall from grace has seemingly been without end.It is now a distant memory, but there was a time when Fred Kolodner's life was full of promise.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | July 24, 1991
A caption to a photograph in the Today section yesterday misidentified Brenda Carl Bridges' children. They are Rebecca and Tommy.They should wear bumper stickers, perhaps, to avoid being rear-ended by those who have yet to see the light. "I brake," they should warn, "for real life."They brake to spend time with their kids rather than their clients. To work part- or flex-time rather than full- or overtime. To contribute to their families and communities rather than to their careers and corporations.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 15, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- Pete Sampras remains too good too be true.He respects umpires, lauds opponents, signs autographs and obliges sponsors. In a more genteel age, none of this would be out of the ordinary. But after the contentious reigns of Jimmy Connors and John McEnroe, after gaudy appearance fees and seven-figure endorsement contracts eroded the game's structure, after the tennis boom and the tennis bust, Sampras still is the refreshing throwback all dressed up in white.Sampras would be excused for showing at least some signs of becoming a spoiled tennis brat surrounded by sycophants.
FEATURES
By Catherine Cook | December 30, 1990
WITH CONSPICUOUS CONSUMPTION ON THE DECLINE AND ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS ON THE RISE, THERE'S NEVER BEEN A GREATER VARIETY OF FAUX FURS -- FROM FRANKLY FAKE IN BLAZING BRIGHTS TO NATURAL-LOOKING COPIES OF AUTHENTIC PELTS.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | October 14, 1990
SAVVY POLITICIANS know the power of symbolic action. Building a shiny image often is more important than actual accomplishments.The danger is that a carefully conceived image can be eroded by the rush of on-going events. It poses big problems for the politician on election day.That accounts for Gov. William Donald Schaefer's concern over his popularity. Yes, as the poll in today's Sun indicates, the governor will have no trouble winning a second term. But it won't be the unprecedented mandate he seeks.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | May 16, 1993
Los Angeles--The taps pour real beer. But the stuff in the glass on the bar in front of where Norm sits and drinks and drinks and drinks is the non-alcoholic kind.The yellow-and-red Wurlitzer jukebox plays real tunes: "The In Crowd" by Dobie Gray, "Heartbreak Hotel" by Elvis Presley, "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" by the Platters and "I Fall to Pieces" by Patsy Cline. But the stairs behind it are fake and go nowhere. There is no Melville's fine seafood restaurant upstairs, as the sign promises.
NEWS
October 10, 2008
The lives of the rich and infamous were on full display in a congressional hearing room this week. There was Richard S. Fuld Jr., the chief of Lehman Brothers Holding, trying to explain his mega-million-dollar pay package. There was Joseph Cassano of American International Group, the beneficiary of an $85 billion government bailout. He was so good at his job at the insurance giant that he's now receiving $1 million a month in consulting fees. And for the junior executives at AIG, a week at an exclusive spa in California.
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