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Consolidation

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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2010
Dutch insurer Aegon's North American base in Baltimore will add more jobs next year when the company's Louisville, Ky., operations are consolidated with offices in the city and in Little Rock, Ark. The exact number of jobs that will relocate to Baltimore is unknown at this point, but Aegon spokesman Greg Tucker said Thursday that more jobs will likely move to Baltimore than to Little Rock. Of the 400 jobs in Louisville, the consolidation will affect 280 jobs. The information technology department of 120 people will remain there, Tucker said.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
More than 300 people will lose jobs in Columbia with the shutdown of the Nielsen Audio call center, part of the consolidation of media ratings company Nielsen Holdings and former competitor Arbitron Inc., according to a notice filed with the state. The 325 job cuts, expected by the end of August, come on top of 333 layoffs announced last November at the former Arbitron headquarters. When Nielsen's $1.3 billion acquisition of Arbitron was announced in 2012, Arbitron employed nearly 1,000 full-time workers nationwide, including 640 full-time employees and 220 part-time workers in Columbia.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
Zynga, the video game maker best known for FarmVille and Words With Friends, has closed its Timonium office as part of a broader corporate consolidation, company officials said Monday. The company also made changes at three other offices, closing and consolidating some in Texas and New York. The company did not say how many jobs were being cut, but said that the moves affected about 1 percent of its work force of more than 3,000. About half of those in the Timonium office were relocated.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | January 16, 2014
Delaying action on spending more money on plans for a countywide consolidated water and sewer agency was the prudent thing for the Harford County Board of Estimates to do. Before the Board last week was a contract with a Bowie firm for $831,000 to put together the organizational infrastructure of what is proposed to be a semi-autonomous county water and sewer authority that would consolidate the management of the various water and sewer systems serving...
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2012
When a Baltimore couple combined two Federal Hill rowhouses into a double-wide home a few years ago, the state's tax assessors made a mistake: Instead of factoring in the values of two addresses, they set the new home's value as if it were still just a single rowhouse. As a result of the state's mistake, which officials acknolwedge, the city issued annual tax bills the past three years that were thousands of dollars lower than they should have been. On Friday, after the state recalculated the value going back to 2009, Marci De Vries learned just how much in back taxes she and her husband will owe on the South Hanover Street property: $7,585.
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | May 14, 1991
When the firehouse at the corner of Liberty Heights Avenue and Garrison Boulevard opened in 1905, the smell of oats and hay hung in the cool air of the building's brick-walled bays. When the alarm bell sounded, massive horses heaved against leather harnesses, hauling wooden fire wagons toward burning buildings.The firehouse is silent now, closed a few weeks ago as part of the city's push to consolidate firehouses and curb the soaring costs of building maintenance.Yesterday, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke was on hand to dedicate a $1.8 million replacement firehouse across the street and a short way up Liberty Heights Avenue from the old building.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
Like a one-two punch, two major Maryland employers in the health care service and pharmaceutical industries were the targets last week of multibillion-dollar acquisition deals. Both homegrown companies — Human Genome Sciences Inc. and Catalyst Health Solutions Inc. — are based in Rockville. Both were courted by out-of-state companies. Human Genome ultimately rebuffed a $2.6 billion offer by biopharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline, saying it was too low. But Catalyst agreed to be acquired by a larger Illinois competitor for $4.4 billion, and Human Genome has officially acknowledged it's on the market.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN REPORTER | October 27, 2006
As part of a nationwide movement, postal workers picketed in front of the main branch of the Baltimore post office on Fayette Street yesterday, protesting anticipated consolidation and ongoing cuts in staff they blame for worsening customer service. About 40 American Postal Workers Union members, joined by Service Employees International Union workers, chanted to the toots of whizzing cars. "Hey, hey. Ho, ho. Postal cuts have got to go," they chanted. But thus far, Baltimore and most of Maryland remain unaffected by the U.S. Postal Service's consolidation plans.
NEWS
February 17, 1991
The Columbia-based publisher of the Howard County Times and the Columbia Flier newspapers is laying off employees in a partial consolidation of its Towson and Columbia operations.Patuxent Publishing, which publishes 13 Baltimore-area newspapers and is owned by New York-based Whitney Communications Co., told "under 15" employees two weeks ago that they would be laid off during the next 2 months, said Publisher S. Zeke Orlinsky."We're not sure what the number's going to be," Orlinsky said of the layoffs, explaining that the company was still working out details of the consolidation of design, production and classified departments.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | April 2, 1995
The city's Housing Authority has received six proposals from downtown office building owners to consolidate more than 400 administrative employees into a central location.The proposals came in response to a Housing Authority of Baltimore City request this month to lease or purchase a minimum of 100,000 square feet of office space within seven blocks of City Hall, at 100 N. Holliday St.If one of the lease proposals is accepted, it will more than double the largest downtown office transaction of the past two years.
NEWS
By Jenn Topper and S. Derek Turner | November 6, 2013
So far this year, 223 local TV stations have changed hands. This is the biggest wave of media consolidation ever - and it's all happening in small and mid-level markets, involving companies most people have never heard of. Leading this wave is Hunt Valley-based Sinclair Broadcast Group. Sinclair alone is behind seven deals this year, including a $985-million deal to buy nine stations from Allbritton Communications. But it's not alone; other media companies are also racing to gobble up stations.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | October 8, 2013
The idea of having Harford County served by a single governmental entity responsible for providing clean water and treating sewage on the whole is a good one. There are, however, aspects of such a system that deserve close public scrutiny as the water and sewer authority is being established. As the water and sewer authority would be managed by an appointed board that will have the authority to set rates, the general public needs to be assured a level of dominion over the service.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
T. Rowe Price, a fixture in downtown Baltimore since its founding 76 years ago, is considering moving its headquarters once its current lease expires in 2017, the company said Wednesday. The Baltimore-based money manager is weighing several options, including building a new headquarters on a number of vacant sites downtown, said spokesman Brian Lewbart. Possibilities include Harbor Point, where Exelon Corp. plans to erect its regional headquarters, as well as the former McCormick & Co. spice factory site at Conway and Light streets, which is now a parking lot, he said.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2013
A decade ago, Maryland's three largest banks were based in Baltimore. Allfirst, the biggest with nearly $17 billion in assets, fell victim to a foreign-exchange trading scandal that resulted in the bank being sold to a New York institution. Out-of-state competitors bought out the other two several years later. Throughout that time, Sandy Spring Bank in Olney operated and grew in their shadow. Today, it's the largest bank headquartered in Maryland, with assets at nearly $4 billion as of the end of last year.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
Zynga, the video game maker best known for FarmVille and Words With Friends, has closed its Timonium office as part of a broader corporate consolidation, company officials said Monday. The company also made changes at three other offices, closing and consolidating some in Texas and New York. The company did not say how many jobs were being cut, but said that the moves affected about 1 percent of its work force of more than 3,000. About half of those in the Timonium office were relocated.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
First Mariner Bancorp reported Thursday it earned about $1.6 million in the fourth quarter, the fourth quarter in a row that the Baltimore parent of 1 s t Mariner Bank posted a profit. First Mariner Bancorp reported Thursday that it earned about $1.6 million in the fourth quarter thanks largely to its mortgage business, making this the fourth quarter in a row that the Baltimore parent of 1st Mariner Bank posted a profit. For the corresponding quarter a year ago, First Mariner lost nearly $4 million.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | January 19, 1992
that is County Executive Robert R. Neall's latest strategy to save money.Neall announced last week that work has begun on a plan to combine computing, warehousing, purchasing, insurance and other operations now being triplicated by the county government, public school system and Anne Arundel Community College. At his request, AACC President Tom Florestano, outgoing school Superintendent Larry L. Lorton andDennis Parkinson, the county's chief administrative officer, met forfour hours Tuesday to discuss 23 potential consolidation projects.
FEATURES
By SUSAN BONDY | July 31, 1994
We've all seen the man on television who claims, "If installment payments or overdue bills are troubling you, we will consolidate all your bills into one low monthly payment. In addition, you will have a long time to pay back this loan." This is a bill-consolidation loan, which lets you pool your debts.But rarely does the TV salesman mention the interest rate you will be charged. His pitch is small monthly payments that seem to be affordable. But are they?First, any money that is very easily available is likely to be very expensive.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2012
An effort to revive more than 13,000 lawsuits filed by people who contend they were sickened by absestos was met with sharp objections Monday by lawyers for potential defendants. Plaintiffs' attorneys said consolidating some of the lawsuits would help people who have seen their cases languish for years. But defense lawyers told a Baltimore judge that the proposal — which made a fortune for the Law Firm of Peter Angelos previously — was unworkable and unfair. Opponents criricized the Angelos fim's suggestion for these cases, for people with a range of cancers but not mesothelioma, which has been closely linked to asbestos exposure.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2012
Baltimore County is set to consolidate its government data center with the school system's next year, which officials say will save up to $4 million in construction costs. The County Council on Monday unanimously approved a proposal by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz to merge the centers. Under the plan, the schools' Department of Technology data center - which has been leasing space in Timonium - will move to the county's data center at the courthouse in Towson by next August. County leaders say combining the centers will save the school system between $2 million and $4 million in construction costs for a new building, plus $100,000 annually in maintenance expenses.
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