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Consignment Shops

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By ANDREW LECKEY and ANDREW LECKEY,Tribune Media Services | September 9, 1994
Kiss them goodbye.There may be perfectly good items around your house that you simply don't need or want anymore. Consignment shops, which will sell them in exchange for splitting the profit, offer a painless way to clean house.Numbering about 15,000 nationwide, such shops have grown by 20 percent during the past two years. There's greater demand for secondhand furniture, clothing and appliances these days because a difficult economy has made Americans more thrifty. Bridal gowns and celebrity items have are also popular.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | August 21, 2014
Twin crusades to convert more parents to cloth diapering and to instill confidence in the art of “babywearing” have helped make Greenberries a destination for shoppers from as far away as Annapolis and Gaithersburg. Providing education and support to parents wasn't part of the original formula for the Columbia children's and maternity consignment boutique, which is celebrating its fifth birthday with a party at the Snowden Center store Aug. 16. But just six months after opening the store in 2009, owner Rachel Baliff jumped on a customer's suggestion to sell cloth diapers.
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FEATURES
By Yolanda Garfield | October 4, 1992
TC Consignment shopping feels like discovering gold at the end of the rainbow.It's a treasure hunt with many satisfied participants.The shopkeeper earns a commission by selling clients' furniture and accessories -- some new, some not. The clients -- artisans, antiquers and homeowners who are changing decor -- recoup some of their investment in the pieces when they sell. And the savvy shopper who patiently scouts in consignment shops takes home the value-priced treasures.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
In a city starved for luxury flagship retail stores, consignment shops are the closest thing fashionistas have to getting the same haute couture looks worn by the world's rich and famous. Although the fashions might not always be current, they are always a fraction of the cost of clothes found in the shopping districts of New York, Paris, London and L.A. In Baltimore, the Roland Park neighborhood offers the greatest concentration of high-end consignment shops. "The Roland Park area is ideal for this industry," said Betsy Wendell, owner of Octavia Cross Keys, a women's boutique in North Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Special to The Sun | March 31, 1994
An article in March 31 editions on consignment shops was accompanied by a list that contained incomplete information. The list implied that it included all area consignment shops specializing in children's clothing. In fact, it was a sampling of area stores offering children's consignments.The Sun regrets the errors.Ahh, spring! A mother's fancy yearns to peel away layers of sweaters, snow coats and sloppy boots and say hello to the children underneath. Aren't they gorgeous? Time to put them into pretty clothes to show off their fresh and sunny dispositions.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | October 15, 1992
Outside the Millersville shop, a sign reads "Consignment." Bu inside, nothing hints of the old or the used.Again & Again Kids Consignment smells of fresh paint and new carpet. A colorful border lines the top of the walls. Clothes hanging from the racks have no stains, holes or worn spots.Most of the clothes have been worn before, though. And that's just fine with Linda Higdon."I don't buy anything new anymore," said the Millersville resident, a consignment shop junkie and mother of two boys, ages 10 and 4.In August, Severna Park resident Lynn Hentschel, who has spent seven years selling retail clothing, opened the store in Northway Shopping Center to deal exclusively in children's clothing, toys and furniture.
FEATURES
By Beth Smith and Beth Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 15, 1998
On one of his occasional forays through furniture consignment shops in Annapolis, interior designer Gary Lawrik spied an impressive block-front chest."
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | September 21, 2008
That silver-plated coffee server you've always meant to use is just collecting dust. Then there's that dress, bought last season, forgotten at the back of the closet. And your son's bicycle with the training wheels - he outgrew that in weeks. You're surrounded by unwanted or little-used stuff when what you really need, frankly, is some extra cash. But could your discards be another person's treasure? Whatever the item - from clothes to sporting goods to wedding gowns to used tools - there's probably a consignment shop eager to sell it. Consignment shops, which sell goods for you and take a cut of the proceeds, say their business is surging amid the nation's economic downturn.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Staff Writer | August 19, 1993
If it's too tight on you, or if it's too tiny for your tots, those ill-fitting clothes might be worth a buck or two.No need to worry about garage or yard sales, either. Brenda Zeigler-Riley wants to peddle your wares next month when she opens A Second Look consignment boutique in Columbia's Wilde Lake Village shopping center.Mrs. Zeigler-Riley plans to charge a $2 annual fee for use of the shop, and any money made when an item is sold will be split 50/50.Mrs. Zeigler-Riley also will accept small household items such as lamps and pictures, costume jewelry, and women's and children's apparel.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2001
Chic & Unique looks like home - lots of other people's homes. That's because that's what it is. The consignment warehouse, around the back of a building in Oakland Ridge Industrial Park, is a business of gathering other people's Victorian sofas, crystal chandeliers, framed French posters and lace potpourri sachets, arranging the items into the perfect living room, and selling the pieces to the masses. Since owner Linda Featherman opened 18 months ago with only a few antiques, she has expanded her warehouse space, growing from 2,800 square feet to nearly 6,000 square feet in a year.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV and The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Can't get enough of Frank and Claire Underwood and the other political types from "House of Cards"? Cornerstone, a Timonium consignment shop, says it is selling furniture from the Netflix series, which is filmed in Maryland. Furniture items include: a pair of lamps ($275), palace urn ($265), arm chair ($395) and tall desk ($495). The public was alerted to the offerings yesterday when the store sent out an e-mail: "House of Cards fans take note! This is your chance to own a piece of television history !"
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
Garnette Lynch Brant, a retired real estate saleswoman who also had a Waverly consignment shop, died of congestive heart failure Nov. 19 at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 93 and lived in Lutherville. Born Mary Garnette Lynch in Yadkin County, N.C., she was raised in Winston-Salem. She was the daughter of Sallie Wishon Ledbetter, an R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. employee, and Luther Lynch, a carpenter. She graduated from Bowman Gray High School in 1937 and became a bookkeeper. In 1940, she left Winston-Salem and moved to Washington, D.C., to work in Army intelligence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
The fifth annual Ecoball is scheduled for March 22. The event is the major fundraiser for Baltimore Green Works, which produces Ecofest and the Sustainability Speaker Series. The Ecoball will again include a cooking competition, inspired by "Top Chef," in which students from Stratford University's culinary program will use locally grown and sourced ingredients to prepare appetizers, entrees and desserts. The evening also includes a silent auction and dancing. Guests are encouraged to re-use or reinvent their gala attire by shopping consignment shops or creating their own evening wear.
EXPLORE
October 9, 2012
Laurel resident Susanne McCoy opened McAdoodle Consignment in September, an upscale children's consignment boutique at Fulton Station, 11845 Route 216, Suite F. The boutique stocks new and like-new children's and maternity clothing, shoes, baby gear, homemade items and new toys. Store hours are Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. To schedule a consignment appointment, go to http://www.mcadoodleconsignment.com or contact mcadoodleconsignment@gmail.com or 301-362-8883.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2012
Stephanie Torrible's Reisterstown consignment shop specializes in secondhand designer duds. It also specializes in giving women a second chance - even those who never set foot in the Main Street store. Clothing that doesn't sell and isn't reclaimed is donated to nonprofit organizations dedicated to helping women land professional jobs, including Baltimore's Suited to Succeed. One woman stands out for Torrible. "She came up to me at an event and told me she got her clothes for her job interview and for her first few months of work from my shop's donations," said Torrible, who opened Wear It's At six years ago. "I love hearing that I helped make that happen.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
Perky sunflowers, fragrant lavender and vibrant greenery surround a creaky wooden porch full of oddities on an Annapolis side street. A well-used plow, a porcelain wash basin and a cast-iron stove hardly seem germane to a consignment shop filled with high fashion, assorted art and tony accessories, as well as the occasional piece of vintage furniture. Owner Stella Breen-Franklin typically greets shoppers to One Petticoat Lane with an effusive "Wahoo!" and a cup of steamy tea, mint- flavored but never, ever iced, even when temperatures reach triple digits.
NEWS
April 9, 1994
An article in March 31 editions on consignment shops was accompanied by a list that contained incomplete information. The list implied that it included all area consignment shops specializing in children's clothing. In fact, it was a sampling of area stores offering children's consignments.The Sun regrets the errors.
FEATURES
By Yolanda Garfield | October 4, 1992
Shoppers accustomed to malls rarely encounter the little shop around the bend where collectibles nestle near precious antiques.Often humble in appearance, these shops yield unpredictable bounty. Here, dust may obscure the magnificence of a chest of drawers crafted of tiger maple. There, a dim corner may hide a table top laden with rhinestone mosaic picture frames from the 1940s. And sometimes, the price is a bargain waiting to be negotiated.Discoveries await the intrepid shopper in city neighborhoods and down rural lanes, on antique rows and in consignment shops.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker | July 19, 2011
I wrote today about Uptown Cheapskate -  a new consignment chain opening in the area. The store's owners promise high-end finds at bargain prices. The opening comes as people continue to watch their cash. They still want to look good, but not pay a pretty price for it. The consignment business is booming. In Baltimore there are at least 30. I've had friends nab designer bags and shoes for as much as 75 percent less then they once retailed for. What kind of finds have you all run across at consignment stores?
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2011
Nancy Kline learned all about retail during a three-decade career at South Moon Under, the trendy boutique chain where, she jokes, she held just about every job except president. Now, she and daughter Emily Schramm, who also worked at South Moon Under, are bringing their retail know-how to a new venture that will focus on cheap — their word — but high-end designer fashion. The pair is set to open Uptown Cheapskate, a 4,000-square-foot consignment store in Timonium, on Tuesday.
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