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By Josh Dombroskie and Josh Dombroskie,sun reporter | January 6, 2008
On a given day, a classical guitar solo, a jazz band number or a piano sonata can be heard emanating from a former convent. Since 2001, the building at the John Carroll School has been used by the Maryland Conservatory of Music, a nonprofit organization that provides musical training in disciplines including chamber orchestra, musical theater, jazz band, choir, guitar ensemble and popular music. And in an effort to put a twist on the traditional perception of music instruction, the conservatory eschews the notion of a stuffy classroom with strict teachers insisting that every note is played to perfection, said Duke Thompson, the MCM's founder and director.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
Betty G. Hocker, a retired Baltimore opera singer and composer who wrote the "Fort McHenry March" at the time of the nation's bicentennial, died Saturday of complications from dementia at Stella Maris Hospice. The longtime Roland Park resident was 101. The daughter of a businessman and a homemaker, Sara Elizabeth "Betty" Gumpper was born into a musical family in Butler, Pa. Her father played the banjo and piano and had a small band, while her mother also played the piano and sang.
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NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 7, 2004
Seven-year-old Nicholas Giannasca of Abingdon has been taking voice lessons at the Maryland Conservatory of Music since summer. "He sings Broadway musicals and likes to watch them," said his mother, Suzanne Giannasca. His teacher, Jennifer Haney, said he has "raw talent." Recently, Nicholas learned that his talent isn't so raw anymore. He was one of six conservatory pupils chosen to represent the school at the Music is Magic 2004 concert Nov. 14. He'll sing "Gary, Indiana," from The Music Man. "I felt very happy," Nicholas said of learning the news.
NEWS
August 13, 2008
On August 7, 2008, Betty Jones Private services will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Maryland Conservatory of Music, 701 E. Churchville Road, Bel Air, MD 21014 or to Building Fund for Harford Hospice, 8003 Corporate Drive, Suite G, Baltimore, MD 21236, Memory tributes may be sent to the family at: mccomasfuneralhome.com
NEWS
August 13, 2008
On August 7, 2008, Betty Jones Private services will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Maryland Conservatory of Music, 701 E. Churchville Road, Bel Air, MD 21014 or to Building Fund for Harford Hospice, 8003 Corporate Drive, Suite G, Baltimore, MD 21236, Memory tributes may be sent to the family at: mccomasfuneralhome.com
FEATURES
January 8, 1995
Bin Huang, first-prize winner in the 1994 Paganini International Violin Competition in Genoa, Italy, will present a recital Thursday at 8:15 p.m. in Friedberg Hall at the Peabody Conservatory of Music.The recital is free.Ms. Huang, a 23-year-old citizen of China, is a student of Berl Senofsky at Peabody. She won the Paganini, regarded as one of the world's top four violin competitions, in October.For more information about the recital, call (410) 659-8124.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | March 29, 1991
Hajime Teri Murai has been appointed as the Peabody Conservatory of Music's chief conductor. The conservatory announced yesterday that Murai will be the first occupant of the Ruth Blaustein Rosenberg Music Director Chair, which was established last summer as part of a $3 million gift from the Blaustein-Rosenberg-Thalheimer family group.The 37-year-old Murai -- who was born in San Francisco, is currently the chief conductor of the Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music and has won numerous awards for adventurous programming -- is the first resident conductor of the Peabody Conservatory since the departure of Peter Eros five years ago.Because of the conservatory's financial problems and uncertainty about its future in recent years, it became impossible to fill so major a position until Peabody's problems were resolved last summer.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | October 28, 1995
Soprano Phyllis Bryn-Julson, professor of voice at the Peabody Conservatory of Music, will give the opening concert in Peabody's "Music for the Close of the Century" series tonight at 7:30 in Friedberg Hall. The series will continue in November with three more concerts -- the last of which will again feature Bryn-Julson -- that will explore the range of contemporary musics as the second millennium comes to a close.Tonight, Bryn-Julson -- who is more closely identified with contemporary music than any other living singer -- will perform works by Luciano Berio, Gyorgy Kurtag, Cathy Berberian and others.
NEWS
June 7, 2004
Steve Lacy, 69, an American soprano saxophonist who spent more than half of his 50-year career living in Europe and helped legitimize his instrument in postwar jazz, died Friday in Boston. The cause was cancer, according to an announcement from the New England Conservatory of Music, where he had been teaching since 2002. After performing in New York, his hometown, Mr. Lacy, who was born Steven Lackritz, moved to Italy and France, and became the most Europeanized of all expatriate American jazz musicians.
NEWS
April 16, 1992
Florence Snyder, a music teacher who had been a concert pianist under her maiden name, Elaine Frantz, died Tuesday at Sinai Hospital of congestive heart failure. She was 85.Services for Mrs. Snyder, a resident of the Highfield House Condominium on North Charles Street, were being held today at Sol Levinson & Bros. funeral establishment, 6010 Reisterstown Road.She taught piano at the Peabody Conservatory of Music in the 1950s and continued to teach students privately at her home until her final illness.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | June 15, 2008
To hear her parents tell it, 19-year-old Anna Wallis began singing almost as soon as she could talk. "She could sing everything, and she sang all the time," said Tina Wallis. "In second grade, she really floored us when she sang a duet in front of the whole school." Dave Wallis added, "She is still flooring us. She has just kept pursuing music. She just loves it." Their daughter, a rising junior at the University of Maryland, College Park, is pursuing a double major in biology and music and has consistently maintained a 4.0 average.
NEWS
By Josh Dombroskie and Josh Dombroskie,sun reporter | January 6, 2008
On a given day, a classical guitar solo, a jazz band number or a piano sonata can be heard emanating from a former convent. Since 2001, the building at the John Carroll School has been used by the Maryland Conservatory of Music, a nonprofit organization that provides musical training in disciplines including chamber orchestra, musical theater, jazz band, choir, guitar ensemble and popular music. And in an effort to put a twist on the traditional perception of music instruction, the conservatory eschews the notion of a stuffy classroom with strict teachers insisting that every note is played to perfection, said Duke Thompson, the MCM's founder and director.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [CHRISTINA LEE] | April 19, 2007
`Tartuffe' The lowdown -- It is believed that Louis XIV banned the first production of Tartuffe, or "The Hypocrite," because of its harsh criticism of morality and religious piety. But audiences everywhere have grown to appreciate playwright Moliere's comedic talents. The Vagabond Players bring Richard Wilbur's verse translation to Baltimore tomorrow through May 20. If you go -- Showtimes at the Vagabond, 806 S. Broadway, are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays through May 20. Tickets are $13-$15.
NEWS
November 23, 2006
Sister Margaret Joyce, who taught music at parochial schools for many years, died of respiratory disease Nov. 15 at her order's motherhouse in Aston, Pa. She was 83. Born in Philadelphia, she was a graduate of the Philadelphia Conservatory of Music and earned a bachelor's degree in English from Villanova University and a master's in music from the Catholic University of America. She entered the Franciscan Sisters of Philadelphia in 1944 and soon after began teaching music and other subjects at Catholic High School, the old St. Paul's parochial school in East Baltimore and at Shrine of the Little Flower School in the Belair-Edison neighborhood.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | October 22, 2006
When Patrick Merrill started taking piano lessons at the age of 7, he was playing simple notes and melodies. But it wasn't long before his parents noticed how naturally Patrick was mastering difficult classical piano pieces. His mother, Brenda Merrill, recalled a lesson where he was learning to play a Mozart sonata. "I had seven years of lessons, and I never learned to play the piece," she said. "Patrick learned more in 10 minutes than I could learn in a month. That stuck in my head."
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 13, 2006
Bonnie Gease gave each child a pair of red rhythm sticks. Then she flipped on music and said, "Hey, hey, let's all tap our sticks today." In response, Timothy Bohon, 3, began to tap his sticks and move to the beat. Across the room, Samuel Scruggs, 2, held a pair of sticks. He appeared totally absorbed, as he tapped an original ditty. The activity was one of about a dozen, offered in a music class that the boys attend, which is designed for children who exhibit symptoms of autism, a developmental disability that results from a neurological disorder.
NEWS
September 16, 1990
Editor: I came away from a recent visit to the Peabody Conservatory of Music filled with superlatives. It turned out to be a gratifying revelation. Besides being located on beautiful Mount Vernon Place, Peabody has wonderful facilities. The ingenious renovations to their old buildings and the magnificent new additions, most of them hidden from the public, without any doubt place Peabody in the front of music schools in this country.Now internationally acclaimed, with an exciting and great faculty, safe and beautiful surroundings, more than 500 students from around the world chose Peabody as the music school to get the high-level education they want.
NEWS
November 23, 2006
Sister Margaret Joyce, who taught music at parochial schools for many years, died of respiratory disease Nov. 15 at her order's motherhouse in Aston, Pa. She was 83. Born in Philadelphia, she was a graduate of the Philadelphia Conservatory of Music and earned a bachelor's degree in English from Villanova University and a master's in music from the Catholic University of America. She entered the Franciscan Sisters of Philadelphia in 1944 and soon after began teaching music and other subjects at Catholic High School, the old St. Paul's parochial school in East Baltimore and at Shrine of the Little Flower School in the Belair-Edison neighborhood.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 15, 2006
In mid-1830s' Paris, the music world heard a totally unexpected sound from a human voice, which, the story goes, Rossini likened to "the squawk of a capon having its throat cut." But soon enough, audiences couldn't get enough of that sound, and it still heats up audiences today: The tenor's high C. The money note. Produced not by falsetto, but full-throttle from the chest, a technique first credited to Gilbert Duprez. The Italian Girl in Algiers Performances are at 7 tonight and 7:30 p.m. Thursday, with five more performances through June 3 at the Kennedy Center, Virginia and New Hampshire avenues, Northwest.
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