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By COX NEWS SERVICE | October 30, 2003
LONDON - Members of Britain's Conservative Party ousted their leader, Iain Duncan Smith, succumbing yesterday to what has become their frequent habit of attacking one another instead of their Labor Party opponents. Tory members of Parliament voted 90-75 to sack the party leader, who would have become prime minister had the party regained a majority in the House of Commons. Duncan Smith, 49, was seen by many political professionals as a wooden orator and clumsy debater. He had failed to make much headway against Prime Minister Tony Blair despite public dissatisfaction with Blair over the war in Iraq and the alleged misuse of intelligence information that preceded it. Before yesterday's vote, political observers had said the Tory party's prospects against Blair and his Labor Party in the next elections, expected in 2005, were grim: The party could limp along under an inept and uncharismatic leader, or it could divide itself even more deeply in a long, bitter leadership struggle.
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NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 12, 2008
LONDON - British Prime Minister Gordon Brown survived a crucial battle of nerves with Parliament yesterday over expanding Britain's anti-terrorism laws, securing initial approval to hold terrorism suspects for up to 42 days before they are charged or freed. The legislation squeaked through the House of Commons by nine votes amid concerns that it could threaten innocent citizens with the loss of their homes, jobs and social networks even if they are released after spending six weeks behind bars.
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NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 1, 1997
LONDON -- Britain's ruling Conservative Party came to power when Jimmy Carter was in the White House.The Tories ditched socialism, beat the unions and cultivated a nation of homeowners and share-holders.They seem bound to lose today's general election, but they can boast they've won the war by irreversibly shaping their country during 18 years of power under Prime Minister John Major and his predecessor, Margaret Thatcher.Even the Labor Party and its 43-year-old leader, Tony Blair, now embrace the free market.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | August 30, 2006
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- British Prime Minister Tony Blair returns from a late-summer vacation in Barbados with his ruling Labor Party approval rating at a 19-year low of 31 percent. Conservatives, under new leader David Cameron, enjoy 40 percent approval, according to the latest Guardian/ICM Poll. Seeking to take advantage of Mr. Blair's troubles and their popularity surge, the Tories last week borrowed a page from what now seems like an ancient Republican Party playbook, publishing a type of "contract with Britain."
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | December 6, 1994
PRETORIA, South Africa -- Three years ago, Koos Botha was figuring out how to plant bombs against black progress in the old South Africa. Now, he's figuring out how to build houses in the new one.The story of the transformation of this one-time right-wing radical seems to sum up the struggle for the soul of the Afrikaner, the white settlers of this land who are so full of contradictions.They fought a courageous war at the end of the 19th century against the oppression of the British and then proceeded in this century to unleash their own oppression against black South Africans.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 28, 1990
LONDON -- John Major, the chancellor of the exchequer who rose out of one of London's toughest neighborhoods, took office today as Britain's prime minister.Major, 47, who had been Margaret Thatcher's chosen heir, arrived at Buckingham Palace where Thatcher formally presented her resignation to Queen Elizabeth II, who asked Major to form a new government.Major, whose father was a circus trapeze artist, was elected leader of the Conservative Party to replace Thatcher, whose resignation under pressure last week surprised the nation.
NEWS
By JOHN DANISZEWSKI and JOHN DANISZEWSKI,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 7, 2005
LONDON -- Britain's Conservative Party anointed 39-year-old David Cameron as leader yesterday, hoping that the polished, clean-cut "old Etonian" will have the magic to lead it out of the political wilderness after three election defeats. Virtually unknown in the country six months ago, Cameron outpolled rival David Davis by a 2-1 margin, taking 134,446 votes to Davis' 64,398. He survived a leadership contest to succeed retiring leader Michael Howard that began with five hopefuls and went on for almost five months.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | February 26, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- In a South African version of George Wallace shouting "Segregation forever," the Conservative Party here declared yesterday that the "white nation" will live on no matter what the outcome of a crucial referendum next month.The Conservatives said they would battle President Frederik W. de Klerk March 17 for the soul of white South Africa in the referendum, which has been called to determine whether the country's 5 million whites want to continue political reforms.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Staff Writer | February 16, 1992
POTCHEFSTROOM, South Africa -- An election for a single seat in Parliament from this town where no black stays after sundown could test political reform in South Africa.The election pits President Frederik W. de Klerk's National Party candidate against a candidate from the rival white Conservative Party, which wants to stop reforms and is luring many whites from Mr. de Klerk's support base.Voting has been taking place the past three weeks. The polls will close Wednesday, and the mood seems to be much against Mr. de Klerk.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 20, 1997
LONDON -- Britain's Conservative Party named its youngest leader in more than 200 years -- and also turned to the right -- when it selected 36-year-old William Hague to succeed John Major as party leader yesterday.Hague now faces the formidable challenge of rebuilding the Tories, whose 18 1/2 -year reign ended in a May 1 landslide that brought to power the Labor Party and Prime Minister Tony Blair, 43."People are sick and tired of this party behaving like a school debating society," said Hague, the youngest Tory leader since 24-year-old William Pitt the Younger in 1783.
NEWS
By STEVEN PHILIP KRAMER and STEVEN PHILIP KRAMER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2006
George W. Bush is not alone. Tony Blair, who basked in extraordinarily high public approval ratings when he became prime minister of Britain nine years ago, is now the most unpopular Labor Party prime minister in modern times, a Daily Telegraph survey showed last week. While Bush struggles with an approval rating in the low 30s, only 26 percent of British voters are satisfied with Blair's performance, lower than Prime Minister Harold Wilson's 27 percent rating in May 1968 after devaluation of the pound.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 23, 2006
TORONTO -- Unless every national poll here is amiss, what has been perhaps the world's winningest political party is heading for a humiliating defeat today. Stephen Harper, 46, an economist and social conservative who is writing a history of ice hockey, appears poised to lead his Conservative Party to victory over Prime Minister Paul Martin's Liberal Party, something that seemed highly improbable a few weeks ago. The Liberals won the last four national elections, governing Canada for 13 years -- as the party did for three-quarters of the past century.
NEWS
By JOHN DANISZEWSKI and JOHN DANISZEWSKI,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 7, 2005
LONDON -- Britain's Conservative Party anointed 39-year-old David Cameron as leader yesterday, hoping that the polished, clean-cut "old Etonian" will have the magic to lead it out of the political wilderness after three election defeats. Virtually unknown in the country six months ago, Cameron outpolled rival David Davis by a 2-1 margin, taking 134,446 votes to Davis' 64,398. He survived a leadership contest to succeed retiring leader Michael Howard that began with five hopefuls and went on for almost five months.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 29, 2005
ARLINGTON, Va. - Democrats, after taking it on the chin over Sen. Richard J. Durbin's remarks comparing U.S. interrogation tactics at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to those used by Hitler, Stalin and Pol Pot, are trying to change the subject by jumping all over White House Deputy Chief of Staff Karl Rove. In a speech June 22 to the Conservative Party of New York, Mr. Rove drew what he said was a distinction "between conservatives and liberals" in national security. He said, "Conservatives saw the savagery of 9/11 and the attacks and prepared for war; liberals saw the savagery of the 9/11 attacks and wanted to prepare indictments and offer therapy and understanding for our attackers."
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 2, 2005
LONDON -- Compared with national elections in the United States, Britain's parliamentary contests have been relatively civil affairs, with issues debated more than personalities and attacks waged on policy proposals but rarely on candidates. This time around is different. As Prime Minister Tony Blair seeks a third term in Thursday's election, his Conservative opponent, Michael Howard, has gone on an attack as fierce as any in memory here, branding him a "liar" undeserving of a third term, which would be a record for a Labor Party leader.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 19, 2004
TORONTO - A week after the Supreme Court gave the government the constitutional go-ahead to expand marriage rights to gays and lesbians, a bitter battle has emerged in Parliament that is creating deep fissures in the Liberal and Conservative parties. Polls indicate that a comfortable majority of Canadians actively support or passively accept legislation being prepared by Prime Minister Paul Martin to redefine marriage across the country. Already courts in six provinces and one territory, all told including 85 percent of the population of nearly 32 million, have struck down old marriage laws to allow gays and lesbians to marry.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | March 3, 1993
LONDON -- As Prime Minister John Major was in Washington last week trying to persuade television interviewers that Britain's decline has been greatly exaggerated by the press, back here people appeared to be moving away from his Conservative Party -- from the bottom, from the middle and, most unsettling of all from the party's point of view, from the top.The Duke of Westminster, said to be richer than Queen Elizabeth II, resigned from the Conservative Party,...
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | November 26, 1990
LONDON -- The three contenders to succeed Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher all claimed yesterday that they could beat the opposition Labor Party in the next general election.Their ability to ensure a fourth Conservative term in office is crucial to the self-survival instincts of the 372 members of Parliament who will vote tomorrow for a new leader.Under the increasingly unpopular leadership of Mrs. Thatcher, Labor had held a consistent double-digit lead in the polls throughout the year. But her resignation reversed that, with opinion polls yesterday saying that any of the Conservative leadership contenders could beat Labor.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | October 30, 2003
LONDON - Members of Britain's Conservative Party ousted their leader, Iain Duncan Smith, succumbing yesterday to what has become their frequent habit of attacking one another instead of their Labor Party opponents. Tory members of Parliament voted 90-75 to sack the party leader, who would have become prime minister had the party regained a majority in the House of Commons. Duncan Smith, 49, was seen by many political professionals as a wooden orator and clumsy debater. He had failed to make much headway against Prime Minister Tony Blair despite public dissatisfaction with Blair over the war in Iraq and the alleged misuse of intelligence information that preceded it. Before yesterday's vote, political observers had said the Tory party's prospects against Blair and his Labor Party in the next elections, expected in 2005, were grim: The party could limp along under an inept and uncharismatic leader, or it could divide itself even more deeply in a long, bitter leadership struggle.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 5, 2003
WASHINGTON - Dear Sen. Bill Frist: I hope you won't mind some unsolicited advice as the Senate returns to work and you assume leadership of the Republican Party. You take over, of course, from former party chief Trent Lott, who famously opined that the nation would have been better off had it elected a segregationist president in 1948. Now he's out of a job and you're promising to work toward "healing those wounds of division" his bungling caused. That's a noble sentiment, yes. But healing will require more than sentiment.
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