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NEWS
June 23, 1996
IN 1994, Ellen R. Sauerbrey lost the closest race for governor in recent Maryland history. Now she is getting ready for another try. There was lingering bitterness in the Republican camp after Ms. Sauerbrey lost her challenge in court shortly before Parris N. Glendening took the oath of office, but she seems to have finally left that behind.A second Sauerbrey-for-governor campaign, though, would be markedly different. She will be running against an incumbent, which is never easy. Public ire toward the Democratic Party has subsided.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | March 21, 2013
"At CPAC, the Future Looks Libertarian," read a dispatch on Time magazine's website. "CPAC: Rand Paul's Big Moment," proclaimed The Week magazine. Meanwhile, The New York Times headlined its story about the annual conservative political action conference "GOP divisions fester at conservative retreat. " George Will, a man who actually knows a thing or two about conservatism, responded to the NYT's use of the word "fester" on ABC News' "This Week. " "Festering: an infected wound, it's awful.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2010
Meeting at a swim and tennis club in this tony Washington suburb, the Montgomery County Tea Party activists demanded answers from Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s pick for lieutenant governor. What will the Republican former governor do to hunt down illegal immigrants if he wins in November? Which government programs will he cut to pay for promised tax cuts? What business regulations will he lift? And the most heated query: Why, the small crew pressed lieutenant gubernatorial hopeful Mary Kane during their meeting last week, won't Ehrlich debate his conservative GOP primary challenger?
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | March 4, 2013
What can you do with a man like Chris Christie? The answer, according to many within the conservative movement: Throw him overboard. And while we're at it, let's toss the gays over the side too. The popular governor of New Jersey has certainly angered many conservatives, including this humble scribe. During the crucial final days of the presidential election, Mr. Christie didn't merely embrace President Barack Obama, he all but endorsed him. Then, during the congressional fight over the disaster-relief bill for victims of superstorm Sandy -- a bill with more pork in it than a Jimmy Dean factory -- Mr. Christie denounced Republicans who wanted to move the legislation a few micrometers closer to kosher.
NEWS
May 3, 1994
* Russell Amos Kirk, 75, author of more than 30 books, hundreds of essays, reviews and syndicated columns and a founder of the modern conservative movement in the United States, died of congestive heart failure April 29 at his home in Mecosta, Mich. He was the editor of the University Bookman, an educational quarterly, and founder of the critical journal Modern Age: A Conservative Review. For nearly 25 years he wrote a column on education called "From the Academy" for the National Review, and for 13 years he wrote a newspaper column distributed by the Los Angeles Times Syndicate.
NEWS
September 28, 2012
It would seem that both your columnist, Dan Rodricks , and author Garret Epps make little distinction between conservatives in general and what they refer to as "the far right" ("Wresting Constitution from the far right," Sept. 25). Since Mr. Rodricks has declared himself an arbiter of what "a good and important read" Mr. Epps' book is, I feel justified to make a recommendation of my own: That they both attend a meeting of any of the local conservative constitutional study groups, such as "We The People" or "The 9-12 Group.
NEWS
By Jill Zuckman and Jill Zuckman,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 13, 2005
WASHINGTON - In a town better known for turning its back on friends in need, the embattled House majority leader, Tom DeLay, was saluted last night as a hero to the conservative movement in a glittering hotel ballroom packed to capacity. "We don't run from our wounded," declared Paul Weyrich, president of the Free Congress Foundation. As ethical questions about his travels, fund raising and close ties with lobbyists engulf DeLay, conservative leaders joined forces to praise the Houston Republican and to beat back Democratic attacks over filet mignon and Atlantic salmon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Pia Nordlinger and By Pia Nordlinger,Special to the Sun | August 6, 2000
"Gang of Five: Leaders at the Center of the Conservative Crusade," by Nina J. Easton. Simon & Schuster. 440 pages. $27. Just in time for election season, Nina J. Easton has written a work of engaging political history: "Gang of Five: Leaders at the Center of the Conservative Crusade." As the title makes plain, this is the story of five men who have been at the core of the conservative movement: strategist William Kristol, currently editor and publisher of the Weekly Standard; Rep. David McIntosh of Indiana, who is now the GOP nominee for governor in that state; anti-tax lobbyist and activist Grover Norquist; civil-rights litigator Clint Bolick; and political consultant Ralph Reed, a founder of the Christian Coalition.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | November 15, 2012
The conservative Gotterdammerung is finally here. "Like dazed survivors in a ravaged city, America's conservatives are wailing and beating their collective breasts," opines the Economist's "Lexington" columnist. "A leading conservative thinker," asked by the Economist to "list today's conservative ideas, laughs bitterly and replies, 'Are there any?'" Former Reaganite Rep. Vin Weber laments in the conservative journal Policy Review, "I have never been so concerned about the future of conservative ideas.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1999
Launching a five-day meeting in Baltimore today, the world's Conservative rabbis will debate the future of a movement that is struggling to maintain its link to tradition while engaging the modern world.Conservative Judaism lives in the tension-filled theological center, a position it has staked between the liberalism of the Reform movement and the traditionalism of the Orthodox."We try to weave a philosophy and practice that's faithful to Jewish law, at the same time trying to make the necessary interpretations for contemporary times," said Rabbi Seymour Essrog, president of the Rabbinical Assembly, the body representing 1,400 Conservative rabbis that is holding its 99th annual convention at the Inner Harbor Sheraton Hotel through Thursday.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | November 15, 2012
The conservative Gotterdammerung is finally here. "Like dazed survivors in a ravaged city, America's conservatives are wailing and beating their collective breasts," opines the Economist's "Lexington" columnist. "A leading conservative thinker," asked by the Economist to "list today's conservative ideas, laughs bitterly and replies, 'Are there any?'" Former Reaganite Rep. Vin Weber laments in the conservative journal Policy Review, "I have never been so concerned about the future of conservative ideas.
NEWS
September 28, 2012
It would seem that both your columnist, Dan Rodricks , and author Garret Epps make little distinction between conservatives in general and what they refer to as "the far right" ("Wresting Constitution from the far right," Sept. 25). Since Mr. Rodricks has declared himself an arbiter of what "a good and important read" Mr. Epps' book is, I feel justified to make a recommendation of my own: That they both attend a meeting of any of the local conservative constitutional study groups, such as "We The People" or "The 9-12 Group.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2010
Meeting at a swim and tennis club in this tony Washington suburb, the Montgomery County Tea Party activists demanded answers from Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s pick for lieutenant governor. What will the Republican former governor do to hunt down illegal immigrants if he wins in November? Which government programs will he cut to pay for promised tax cuts? What business regulations will he lift? And the most heated query: Why, the small crew pressed lieutenant gubernatorial hopeful Mary Kane during their meeting last week, won't Ehrlich debate his conservative GOP primary challenger?
NEWS
By Jacob Heilbrunn and Jacob Heilbrunn,OP-ED COMMENTARY | March 2, 2008
By common consent, William F. Buckley Jr., who died Wednesday, was the father of modern conservatism. But he also ended up as one of the Bush administration's most trenchant critics. His death not only represents the loss of one of America's leading intellectual figures but also underscores the extent of the collapse of the conservative movement that has so decisively shaped politics for decades. Like no other personality, Mr. Buckley pulled together the disparate strands of the conservative movement to endow it with panache, self-confidence and a sense of being on the cutting edge.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporter | January 31, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Conservative Republicans, out of power in Congress for the first time in 12 years, will return to Baltimore tomorrow for a three-day retreat featuring pep talks by such movement lights as former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, former House Majority Leader Dick Armey and former Sen. Phil Gramm. On Friday, the members of the House Republican Study Committee will hear a pitch from former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, who has been courting conservative leaders in his run for the Republican presidential nomination.
NEWS
By Tom Hamburger and Peter Wallsten and Tom Hamburger and Peter Wallsten,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Awaking to the dismal reality of widespread defeat, more than 100 of the conservative movement's most ardent leaders gathered as they have every Wednesday for more than a decade in a downtown conference room to discuss strategy. And, although they had lost control of the House, where Newt Gingrich had launched the "Republican Revolution" 12 years ago, they showed few signs of despair. Instead, speaker after speaker declared that voters had not rejected conservative ideas, but had merely rejected Republican Party leaders who strayed from the movement's basic values.
NEWS
By JOSEPH R. L. STERNE | August 23, 1992
Houston. -- These are unsettling times for the conservative movement that has been the driving force in American politics for more than a generation. Old war horses and true believers, assembled once again at a Republican National Convention, knew in their hearts last week that the Goldwater-Reagan revolution has run its course.It is a victim of time and its own success. The Bush years have been one slow dying, and even if they continue another four years the face of conservatism will be irreparably changed.
NEWS
By Tom Hamburger and Peter Wallsten and Tom Hamburger and Peter Wallsten,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Awaking to the dismal reality of widespread defeat, more than 100 of the conservative movement's most ardent leaders gathered as they have every Wednesday for more than a decade in a downtown conference room to discuss strategy. And, although they had lost control of the House, where Newt Gingrich had launched the "Republican Revolution" 12 years ago, they showed few signs of despair. Instead, speaker after speaker declared that voters had not rejected conservative ideas, but had merely rejected Republican Party leaders who strayed from the movement's basic values.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | October 11, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Hell hath no fury like a conservative scorned. Voices that only months ago were praising President Bush's single-minded resoluteness now call upon him to flip-flop. Within hours of his nomination of Harriet Miers to fill the U.S. Supreme Court seat being vacated by Sandra Day O'Connor, the right wing of the punditry pantheon opened with choruses of complaint. Their message, if I may paraphrase rapper Kanye West: George Bush doesn't care about right-wing people. Or, more precisely, he does not care enough about them to suit such conservative commentators as George Will, Rush Limbaugh, Patrick J. Buchanan, William Kristol, Charles Krauthammer, Paul Weyrich, Phyllis Schlafly and Ann Coulter.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 16, 2005
WASHINGTON - Some leading conservative activists say they plan to screen 2008 Republican presidential hopefuls, perhaps as early as this fall, in hopes of finding a candidate they can endorse as a group. Religious and social conservatives, long an influential power center within the Republican Party, have been stepping up their efforts in the months since the 2004 election, when conservative Christian voters played a key role in helping President Bush gain a second term. With an eye toward the post-Bush succession fight, Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council, said yesterday that he and other conservative activists would like to "interview some of the candidates" sometime this fall and determine whether a single candidate merits their support.
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