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NEWS
September 19, 2004
Conservation Reserve Program deadline near Farmers and landowners are reminded that Conservation Reserve Program general sign-up ends Friday at local U.S. Department of Agriculture service centers. Participants with CRP contracts expiring this year and next can make new contract offers and renew their participation in the program. The CRP is designed to improve the nation's natural resource base. Participants voluntarily enter into contracts with USDA to enroll erodible and other environmentally sensitive land in contracts for 10 to 15 years.
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Letter to The Aegis | April 18, 2013
Editor: Since its inception in 1970, Earth Day has led to enormous growth in understanding the consequences we face if we do not take care of our natural resources. It has led to more action to protect our planet's land, water, air, wildlife and human beings, and it has strengthened farmers' and ranchers' already strong commitment to being good environmental stewards. Farmers observe Earth Day every day. Where asphalt and pavement turn to gravel and dirt, you will find men and women rising early, greeting the day and working the earth.
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Letter to The Aegis | April 18, 2013
Editor: Since its inception in 1970, Earth Day has led to enormous growth in understanding the consequences we face if we do not take care of our natural resources. It has led to more action to protect our planet's land, water, air, wildlife and human beings, and it has strengthened farmers' and ranchers' already strong commitment to being good environmental stewards. Farmers observe Earth Day every day. Where asphalt and pavement turn to gravel and dirt, you will find men and women rising early, greeting the day and working the earth.
NEWS
September 19, 2004
Conservation Reserve Program deadline near Farmers and landowners are reminded that Conservation Reserve Program general sign-up ends Friday at local U.S. Department of Agriculture service centers. Participants with CRP contracts expiring this year and next can make new contract offers and renew their participation in the program. The CRP is designed to improve the nation's natural resource base. Participants voluntarily enter into contracts with USDA to enroll erodible and other environmentally sensitive land in contracts for 10 to 15 years.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1999
Ralph Naill made two trips from his Frederick County farm to the Westminster Livestock Auction yesterday: once to buy straw -- at 12 times the price he paid two weeks earlier -- and later to sell three or four head of beef cattle he can't afford to feed in the driest summer he's seen in his 53 years.Other farmers were crowding their cattle into the stockyard yesterday, hoping to cut their losses by selling animals that are eating away at their income."The market is going to be flooded with cattle in the next few weeks," said Naill's daughter, Tammy Naill-Waddell, who helped him load bales onto a flatbed trailer while her 6-month-old son, Timothy, shifted around in his stroller.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1999
Farmers in several Maryland counties have begun to get permission to mow hay from federal conservation land, but it might be too late: The cover grasses in fields have dried up to the point of losing nutritional value.Several Maryland counties are asking for a waiver for emergency haying and grazing of fields enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program. The program pays landowners to maintain a grass cover on eroding or environmentally sensitive land.Carroll County's Farm Service Agency, a local arm of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, was the first to ask its headquarters for the waiver, seeking relief from the effects of the region's worst drought in 70 years.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1999
Farmers in several Maryland counties have begun to get permission to mow hay on federal conservation land, but it might be too late: The cover grasses in fields have dried up to the point of losing nutritional value.Several Maryland counties are asking for a waiver for emergency haying and grazing of fields enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program. The program pays landowners to maintain a grass cover on eroding or environmentally sensitive land.Carroll County's Farm Service Agency, a local arm of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, was the first to ask its headquarters for the waiver, seeking relief from the effects of the region's worst drought in 70 years.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1999
Maryland's groundbreaking $200 million project to help restore the Chesapeake Bay by planting trees and grasses on farmland near streams will fall short of its goal by more than half.State and federal agencies set out in 1997 to pay Maryland farmers to replace 100,000 acres of crops near streams with buffer zones of forests, grasses or wetlands. Farmers have put only 13,000 acres into the program, and a state Department of Natural Resources analysis shows that the best they can expect by the end of the five-year effort is 43,000 acres.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1995
The second split of the Maryland duck hunting season opens tomorrow, and the immediate prospects for waterfowlers are good.Duck populations are up, the season is longer and bag limits larger than last year, and recent below freezing weather to our north should have accelerated the southerly migration of many species.But while the short-term outlook is bright, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is concerned that proposals on Capitol Hill could dim the long-term outlook."The number of ducks flying south this fall is estimated to be 80 million, up from 55 million a decade ago," USFWS Director Mollie Beattie said recently.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1999
Ralph Naill made two trips from his Frederick County farm to the Westminster Livestock Auction yesterday: once to buy straw -- at 12 times the price he paid two weeks earlier -- and later to sell three or four head of beef cattle he can't afford to feed in the driest summer he's seen in his 53 years.Other farmers were crowding their cattle into the stockyard yesterday, hoping to cut their losses by selling beasts that are eating away at their income."The market is going to be flooded with cattle in the next few weeks," said Naill's daughter, Tammy Naill-Waddell, who helped him load bales onto a flatbed trailer while her 6-month-old son, Timothy, shifted around in his stroller.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1999
Maryland's groundbreaking $200 million project to help restore the Chesapeake Bay by planting trees and grasses on farmland near streams will fall short of its goal by more than half.State and federal agencies set out in 1997 to pay Maryland farmers to replace 100,000 acres of crops near streams with buffer zones of forests, grasses or wetlands. Farmers have put only 13,000 acres into the program, and a state Department of Natural Resources analysis shows that the best they can expect by the end of the five-year effort is 43,000 acres.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1999
Farmers in several Maryland counties have begun to get permission to mow hay from federal conservation land, but it might be too late: The cover grasses in fields have dried up to the point of losing nutritional value.Several Maryland counties are asking for a waiver for emergency haying and grazing of fields enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program. The program pays landowners to maintain a grass cover on eroding or environmentally sensitive land.Carroll County's Farm Service Agency, a local arm of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, was the first to ask its headquarters for the waiver, seeking relief from the effects of the region's worst drought in 70 years.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1999
Farmers in several Maryland counties have begun to get permission to mow hay on federal conservation land, but it might be too late: The cover grasses in fields have dried up to the point of losing nutritional value.Several Maryland counties are asking for a waiver for emergency haying and grazing of fields enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program. The program pays landowners to maintain a grass cover on eroding or environmentally sensitive land.Carroll County's Farm Service Agency, a local arm of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, was the first to ask its headquarters for the waiver, seeking relief from the effects of the region's worst drought in 70 years.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1999
Ralph Naill made two trips from his Frederick County farm to the Westminster Livestock Auction yesterday: once to buy straw -- at 12 times the price he paid two weeks earlier -- and later to sell three or four head of beef cattle he can't afford to feed in the driest summer he's seen in his 53 years.Other farmers were crowding their cattle into the stockyard yesterday, hoping to cut their losses by selling animals that are eating away at their income."The market is going to be flooded with cattle in the next few weeks," said Naill's daughter, Tammy Naill-Waddell, who helped him load bales onto a flatbed trailer while her 6-month-old son, Timothy, shifted around in his stroller.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1999
Ralph Naill made two trips from his Frederick County farm to the Westminster Livestock Auction yesterday: once to buy straw -- at 12 times the price he paid two weeks earlier -- and later to sell three or four head of beef cattle he can't afford to feed in the driest summer he's seen in his 53 years.Other farmers were crowding their cattle into the stockyard yesterday, hoping to cut their losses by selling beasts that are eating away at their income."The market is going to be flooded with cattle in the next few weeks," said Naill's daughter, Tammy Naill-Waddell, who helped him load bales onto a flatbed trailer while her 6-month-old son, Timothy, shifted around in his stroller.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1995
The second split of the Maryland duck hunting season opens tomorrow, and the immediate prospects for waterfowlers are good.Duck populations are up, the season is longer and bag limits larger than last year, and recent below freezing weather to our north should have accelerated the southerly migration of many species.But while the short-term outlook is bright, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is concerned that proposals on Capitol Hill could dim the long-term outlook."The number of ducks flying south this fall is estimated to be 80 million, up from 55 million a decade ago," USFWS Director Mollie Beattie said recently.
NEWS
By Scott A. Hodge | October 29, 1991
ANTI-TAX fervor is percolating nationwide. Thousands of angry taxpayers staged protests in nearly 200 cities recently, demanding that Congress cut taxes and stop wasting money. The message is getting through even to Congress: Both conservative and liberal lawmakers finally are offering tax relief programs to ease the burden on American families.Here's a simple formula for Washington's spendaholics: Every $1 million reduction in federal spending would provide $3,000 in tax relief to 333 households.
NEWS
September 22, 2002
Some Carroll County farmland that is enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) or the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) is eligible for emergency haying and grazing. Severe weather conditions have depleted hay supplies and affected the growth of hay and pasture. Because drought damage is widespread in Carroll County, the Farm Service Agency has made some CRP/CREP ground eligible for hay or grazing under certain conditions. Donation of hay, haying or grazing privileges to livestock producers in dire need because of the drought is encouraged.
NEWS
By Scott A. Hodge | October 29, 1991
ANTI-TAX fervor is percolating nationwide. Thousands of angry taxpayers staged protests in nearly 200 cities recently, demanding that Congress cut taxes and stop wasting money. The message is getting through even to Congress: Both conservative and liberal lawmakers finally are offering tax relief programs to ease the burden on American families.Here's a simple formula for Washington's spendaholics: Every $1 million reduction in federal spending would provide $3,000 in tax relief to 333 households.
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