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Conservation Programs

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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and David L. Greene and Karen Hosler and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 10, 2001
WASHINGTON - President Bush supplied the details yesterday of a proposed budget that seeks to control the growth of federal spending by curtailing many of the urban, environmental and conservation programs particularly vital to Maryland that flourished during the Clinton administration. Bush described the plan he sent to Congress as "a new way of doing business in Washington and a new way of thinking. The budget puts the taxpayers first, and that's exactly where they belong." Federal spending subject to congressional approval would rise by 4 percent under the $1.96 trillion proposal.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
With its four terraces of thriving plants sloping down toward a babbling lily pond, Jim Duke's garden could certainly be considered a healing place. And that's precisely what the world-renowned botanist and author's Green Farmacy Garden is. Featuring 80 plots that showcase 300 plants for whatever ails you — from addictions to yeast infections and everything in between — the garden is a living catalog of herbal medicine. From 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, the Howard County Conservancy will sponsor a lecture and guided tour of the garden at the Fulton home Jim Duke shares with his wife, Peggy.
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BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | August 17, 1991
Starting Oct. 1, the Potomac Electric Power Co. plans to give away free energy-efficient light bulbs and insulation to thousands of Marylanders -- and make money at it.Pepco's proposal, which will be considered by the Maryland Public Service Commission Aug. 21, is the first plan to result from a year-old drive by state officials to encourage utility companies to save as well as sell energy.Since PSC staffers helped negotiate the agreement, company and state officials said yesterday that they expected the plan to win approval.
NEWS
February 17, 2014
At the request of Gov. Martin O'Malley, the Maryland General Assembly is considering legislation to expand 14 of Maryland's existing wilderness areas and add nine new ones, increasing by nearly 22,000 acres the state's Wildlands Preservation System ( "Maryland eyes expanding wildlands," Nov. 3). The system includes lands or waters already owned by the state that have retained their wilderness character or contain rare or vanishing species of plant or animal life. They may include unique ecological, geological, scenic and contemplative recreational areas and are Maryland's equivalent to the federal Wilderness Preservation System.
NEWS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 9, 1990
OCEAN CITY -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer announced last night the appointment of a 52-year-old Severna Park man to serve as the state's "energy czar."Gerald L. Thorpe, now director of community assistance for the state's Housing and Community Development Department, will be responsible for coordinating recycling and conservation programs that are currently seen as administered on a piecemeal basis.Governor Schaefer, who made the announcement here at the annual legislative conference of the Maryland Chamber of Commerce, said he wants more programs to reduce automobile lTC use, conserve energy and encourage recycling.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | May 2, 1991
The Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. has signed an agreement with state regulators, consumer and environmental advocates to "aggressively" pursue energy conservation programs in exchange for an opportunity to profit from the resulting cut in energy consumption."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | May 2, 1991
The Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. has signed an agreement to pursue energy conservation programs "aggressively" in exchange for an opportunity to profit from the resulting cut in energy consumption."
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | March 24, 1991
Sometime next year, power company workers may come to your house and help you plug drafts, install money-saving light bulbs and lower your electric bill.That's right, area electric companies could start spending tens of millions of dollars more on energy conservation programs that will cut into their electricity sales.The reason: Maryland regulators are trying to kick-start energy conservation by giving utility companies a bonus for reducing power sales.Although Americans just spent billions of tax dollars and sacrificed the lives of dozens of soldiers to free oil-rich Kuwait, they have shown a marked reluctance to bother with energy conservation that could reduce reliance on foreign oil.So, as U.S. soldiers and diplomats try to forge a "new world order" out of the distant battlefield, consumer advocates, state energy officials and utility executives are forming a new energy order here at home by radically changing the rules that determine how electric companies earn their profits.
NEWS
November 13, 2005
Md. Angus Women to hold basket bingo The Maryland Angus Women will hold Longaberger basket bingo Nov. 26 at the Carroll County Agriculture Center, Smith Avenue, Westminster. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and games begin at 7 p.m. The evening will feature 20 games, a raffle for the Christmas collection and a winner-takes-all raffle. Food will be available. Tickets are $13 in advance and $15 at the door. Proceeds will benefit the Maryland Angus Women's scholarship fund. Information: 410-751-1257.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | May 2, 1991
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. agreed yesterday to negotiate changes in the way it does business, setting the stage for a regulatory revolution that could reward the state's largest utility for selling less natural gas and electricity.The announcement of the start of negotiations among environmentalists, company officials, regulators and consumers comes eight months after another electric utility, Potomac Electric Power Co., finished similar negotiations and agreed to a plan that rewards conservation.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2012
TheU.S. Senatepassed a sweeping, five-year farm bill on Thursday that would change the way the government subsidizes agriculture and maintain funding for Chesapeake Bay restoration -- despite earlier threatened cuts -- Maryland lawmakers and environmentalists said.   The legislation eliminates a Chesapeake Bay-centered program that brought in $50 million annually for conservation efforts. But regional lawmakers said they fought for and won changes in proposed new programs that would prioritize the bay and recoup the money.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2010
With packing boxes and invoices everywhere, Bob Bealle's studio hardly resembles the place where he created the oil painting that graces this year's Federal Duck Stamp. "It looks like a factory. I don't have a place for my easel," said Bealle, a Waldorf farmer and former taxidermist. "I don't have time to get too excited. I'm too tired." Then he laughs. When you've dreamed about something for nearly three decades and had your heart broken a half-dozen times, you're allowed to be a little giddy.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,sun reporter | April 3, 2008
The Maryland Senate reversed course yesterday on a key piece of Gov. Martin O'Malley's plan for reducing the state's energy consumption, giving it preliminary approval after reaching a compromise that directed more money toward financial help for lower-income families' electric bills. The legislation had failed Tuesday as lawmakers and the administration sought disparate ways to spend a new pool of money from a greenhouse-gas reduction initiative. Some lawmakers wanted to spend more on direct rate rebates to consumers, while O'Malley and other lawmakers wanted to dedicate a bigger portion of the proceeds to programs designed to cut energy use, which they contend would save consumers more over the long run. The state anticipates raising about $140 million a year or more by requiring utilities to buy and sell "allowances" for emissions from fossil-fuel plants that can then be traded through auctions starting in September.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,Sun reporter | December 28, 2007
Gov. Martin O'Malley wants you to use less electricity, building on the premise that the cheapest and least-polluting kilowatt is the one never used. But the goal he set in July - getting every Marylander to cut electricity use by 15 percent in seven years - is running up against the technical and financial realities of the power industry he wants to reform. Utilities recently met his call to action with proposed conservation programs that together could cost ratepayers hundreds of millions of dollars over many years and still fall short of the goal.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | July 15, 2007
Maryland farmers could be poised to receive more money to help pay for conservation practices that reduce the amount of pollution making its way into the Chesapeake Bay. A version of the 2007 federal Farm Bill drafted by Rep. Collin C. Peterson, chairman of the House Agriculture Committee, would direct $150 million to farmers in bay-region states for conservation programs. Environmentalists in Maryland are applauding the Minnesota Democrat's proposal as a potential major step in the restoration of the bay. "The region's farmers have repeatedly demonstrated their willingness to implement conservation measures, but they can't foot the bill alone," said Doug Siglin, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's federal affairs director.
NEWS
July 9, 2007
America's farm safety net is spending billions to subsidize agribusinesses whose profits are soaring, whose prices undercut small-plot farmers in this country and abroad, and whose crops contribute to obesity and water pollution. Yet a promising drive to shift subsidies away from the largest and more profitable grain and cotton farms to smaller fruit and vegetable outlets, as well as to conservation programs to help farmers keep fertilizer out of the Chesapeake Bay, is faltering badly.
NEWS
July 9, 2007
America's farm safety net is spending billions to subsidize agribusinesses whose profits are soaring, whose prices undercut small-plot farmers in this country and abroad, and whose crops contribute to obesity and water pollution. Yet a promising drive to shift subsidies away from the largest and more profitable grain and cotton farms to smaller fruit and vegetable outlets, as well as to conservation programs to help farmers keep fertilizer out of the Chesapeake Bay, is faltering badly.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | January 29, 2006
A new federal program that pays farmers for their conservation efforts needs improvement to better assist Maryland farmers in their attempts to protect the environment and reduce pollution of the Chesapeake Bay. That is the conclusion of a recent study of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Conservation Security Program conducted by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. "It's a great program with tremendous potential, but it could be better for Maryland and the bay region if a couple of changes are made," said Michael Heller, manager of the foundation's demonstration farm near Upper Marlboro.
NEWS
November 13, 2005
Md. Angus Women to hold basket bingo The Maryland Angus Women will hold Longaberger basket bingo Nov. 26 at the Carroll County Agriculture Center, Smith Avenue, Westminster. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and games begin at 7 p.m. The evening will feature 20 games, a raffle for the Christmas collection and a winner-takes-all raffle. Food will be available. Tickets are $13 in advance and $15 at the door. Proceeds will benefit the Maryland Angus Women's scholarship fund. Information: 410-751-1257.
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