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By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | March 5, 1995
Two Carroll General Assembly delegates are trying to exempt the county from Maryland's forest conservation law, which requires developers to compensate for the loss of trees.Local governments can adopt their own forest conservation laws or operate under the state law, passed in 1991. Two of the three county commissioners have pledged not to scrap Carroll's local forest conservation law if the state mandate is removed.Del. Donald B. Elliott and Joseph M. Getty, both Republicans, signed on to a bill that would remove 17 of Maryland's 23 counties from the law's jurisdiction.
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NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2002
Carroll County homeowners who wish to drill wells, or construct new decks or garages, soon could have more control over where they build. The Carroll commissioners are pushing to relax some of the regulations in the county's Forest Conservation Ordinance, a law that seeks to preserve trees and minimize the impact of development on the landscape. The proposed changes will be discussed during a public hearing Tuesday. "Our local law was more restrictive than the state required," said Commissioner Julia Walsh Gouge.
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NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | August 10, 1993
In the wake of pressure from town officials, the Carroll commissioners voted yesterday against a measure that critics had charged would undermine the penalty section of the county's forest conservation law.On a 2-1 vote, the commissioners killed an amendment that would have changed "shall be assessed a penalty" to "may be assessed a penalty."Commissioner Elmer C. Lippy said the public perceived the proposed change as an attempt to weaken the law, which was adopted last year with the goal of preserving the county's fragmented forests.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2001
Michele and Gregory Reina chopped down two dead trees in their back yard and erected an above-ground pool. For that, they've been made to feel like criminals. Baltimore County dragged the Reinas into Circuit Court, and considered fining them $1.3 million for their actions. The county decided against a monetary penalty, but a judge did place the couple on probation for 18 months. The Reinas, it turns out, had stepped into the thicket of the county's forest conservation law, an 8-year-old statute that is cheered by preservationists even as it confounds homeowners accused of violating its provisions.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2002
Carroll County homeowners who wish to drill wells, or construct new decks or garages, soon could have more control over where they build. The Carroll commissioners are pushing to relax some of the regulations in the county's Forest Conservation Ordinance, a law that seeks to preserve trees and minimize the impact of development on the landscape. The proposed changes will be discussed during a public hearing Tuesday. "Our local law was more restrictive than the state required," said Commissioner Julia Walsh Gouge.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | November 3, 1992
Nearly a year ago, environmentalists, foresters and municipal leaders -- outnumbering a small group of developers -- urged the Carroll County commissioners to write their own forest conservation law.Yesterday, that drafted proposal appeared to be in jeopardy as Commissioner President Donald I. Dell said he wasn't "quite ready to make a determination" on the county's proposal vs. the state law.Counties in Maryland have been given the option of either adhering...
NEWS
March 16, 1995
The time has come to strip the bark off the arguments to exempt Carroll County and other non-metropolitan subdivisions from Maryland's forest conservation law. To gather support for this measure, proponents are passing off a lot of nonsense as fact.In testimony last week before the House Environmental Matters Committee, Carroll County Commissioner Donald I. Dell said the forest conservation law is driving industry from the state. Maryland may not enjoy a national reputation as a haven for business, but the state's forest conservation law is hardly the reason.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | July 8, 1993
A proposed change in Carroll's forest conservation law would affect only one word, but it is generating some talk.Carroll commissioners are considering changing one word in the section of the law that deals with penalties, and at least one resident who was involved in drafting the law is concerned."
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | July 23, 1993
The Carroll commissioners' debate over whether "shall" should be changed to "may" in a section of the county's forest conservation law took another turn yesterday.Commissioner Elmer C. Lippy, who initially backed the proposed word change, said the public's perception that the commissioners are trying to "water down" the forest conservation law has caused him to reconsider his stance."In light of the public perception that we're watering this down, I would object to any replacing of the word 'shall,' " Mr. Lippy said.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | July 28, 1993
The county commissioners' plans to change a word in the penalty section of the forest conservation law would make the law too lenient, Mount Airy and Westminster officials said yesterday."
NEWS
October 8, 1996
TREES MAY BE a crop raised for harvest. They may be a visual amenity. They are certainly a valuable environmental resource in reducing flooding and erosion, in cleaning the air we breathe. Like wetlands, they have a widespread public utility extending beyond individual property lines.In a county such as Carroll, beset by development pressures, conservation and management of these resources is especially important. Carroll has one of the lowest percentages of forest cover -- 27 percent -- in Maryland.
NEWS
April 17, 1995
This Law Belittles Mother NatureIn its March 16 editorial espousing the forest conservation law, The Sun lays open some of the fundamental problems with the ''Tree Bill.'' The editorial specifically notes that Carroll County, a rural county, has a lesser percentage of existing tree cover than more urban Anne Arundel and Howard, and a roughly equal percentage of cover to Prince George's, Montgomery and Baltimore counties.Clearly, then, loss of forest does not result only from development and urbanization.
NEWS
March 16, 1995
The time has come to strip the bark off the arguments to exempt Carroll County and other non-metropolitan subdivisions from Maryland's forest conservation law. To gather support for this measure, proponents are passing off a lot of nonsense as fact.In testimony last week before the House Environmental Matters Committee, Carroll County Commissioner Donald I. Dell said the forest conservation law is driving industry from the state. Maryland may not enjoy a national reputation as a haven for business, but the state's forest conservation law is hardly the reason.
NEWS
March 9, 1995
Since its enactment four years ago, Maryland's forest conservation law has been a favorite target of developers. They complain that complying with the law adds significantly to the cost of construction and that the regulations are too complex. Opponents of the law would like to see it eviscerated. A Frederick state legislator, J. Anita Stup, appears more than willing to oblige.The Republican delegate has sponsored legislation that would exempt most of Maryland from the forest law except for Baltimore City and the half-dozen most urban and suburban counties, including Howard.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | March 5, 1995
Two Carroll General Assembly delegates are trying to exempt the county from Maryland's forest conservation law, which requires developers to compensate for the loss of trees.Local governments can adopt their own forest conservation laws or operate under the state law, passed in 1991. Two of the three county commissioners have pledged not to scrap Carroll's local forest conservation law if the state mandate is removed.Del. Donald B. Elliott and Joseph M. Getty, both Republicans, signed on to a bill that would remove 17 of Maryland's 23 counties from the law's jurisdiction.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | September 15, 1993
The Eastern narrow-mouthed toad has not been spotted officially in St. Mary's County for years, which doesn't necessarily mean it's not there. That's how it is with this toad, a critter about the size of a half-dollar that makes a career out of being unseen.Shy as it is, the amphibian lately is casting a long shadow over California, Md., where the county Public Works Department plans to rebuild a two-lane road next to St. Mary's State Park.But the widening of Indian Bridge Road poses a threat to the toad, protected by the state since 1972 as an endangeredspecies in Maryland.
NEWS
March 9, 1995
Since its enactment four years ago, Maryland's forest conservation law has been a favorite target of developers. They complain that complying with the law adds significantly to the cost of construction and that the regulations are too complex. Opponents of the law would like to see it eviscerated. A Frederick state legislator, J. Anita Stup, appears more than willing to oblige.The Republican delegate has sponsored legislation that would exempt most of Maryland from the forest law except for Baltimore City and the half-dozen most urban and suburban counties, including Howard.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2001
Michele and Gregory Reina chopped down two dead trees in their back yard and erected an above-ground pool. For that, they've been made to feel like criminals. Baltimore County dragged the Reinas into Circuit Court, and considered fining them $1.3 million for their actions. The county decided against a monetary penalty, but a judge did place the couple on probation for 18 months. The Reinas, it turns out, had stepped into the thicket of the county's forest conservation law, an 8-year-old statute that is cheered by preservationists even as it confounds homeowners accused of violating its provisions.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | September 10, 1993
Cpl. Paul M. Hanyok, a Mount Airy resident and father of five children, has been named Maryland Natural Resources Police Officer of the Year for 1992-1993.Corporal Hanyok, a six-year veteran of the Natural Resources Police, was selected because of "his professionalism, dedication and contributions to conservation law enforcement," according to NRP Superintendent Franklin I. Wood."Corporal Hanyok's expertise and dedication to Maryland's citizens and natural resources, as well as his uncompromising commitment to excellence, represent the highest standards of the Maryland Natural Resources Police," Colonel Wood said.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | August 10, 1993
In the wake of pressure from town officials, the Carroll commissioners voted yesterday against a measure that critics had charged would undermine the penalty section of the county's forest conservation law.On a 2-1 vote, the commissioners killed an amendment that would have changed "shall be assessed a penalty" to "may be assessed a penalty."Commissioner Elmer C. Lippy said the public perceived the proposed change as an attempt to weaken the law, which was adopted last year with the goal of preserving the county's fragmented forests.
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