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NEWS
By Julie Cart and Julie Cart,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 8, 2004
Despite international efforts to promote biodiversity, a new study has found that hundreds of the world's animal species are in imminent danger of extinction, primarily in tropical mountains and islands in developing nations. The report, published yesterday in the journal Nature, concludes that although more than 10 percent of the Earth's land mass is afforded environmental protections, efforts are not being focused in places that have the greatest concentration of imperiled species. The "global gap analysis" conducted by scientists for Conservation International studied mammals, amphibians, birds, turtles and tortoises - which together represent just 1 percent of the planet's species.
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FEATURES
By LINELL SMITH and LINELL SMITH,SUN REPORTER | April 10, 2006
Bruce Beehler has enshrined the moment in August 1959, when he first glimpsed the future perching in a tree at Lake Roland. Picnicking with his family in Baltimore County, the 8-year-old boy happened to look up and spot a red-bellied woodpecker. "At the time, I didn't know what the hell it was," he says. "I just knew it was the most beautiful thing. And it's been all downhill ever since." As it turns out, the Baltimore-born naturalist was meant not only to marvel over birds, but to infect others with his passion.
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FEATURES
By LINELL SMITH and LINELL SMITH,SUN REPORTER | April 10, 2006
Bruce Beehler has enshrined the moment in August 1959, when he first glimpsed the future perching in a tree at Lake Roland. Picnicking with his family in Baltimore County, the 8-year-old boy happened to look up and spot a red-bellied woodpecker. "At the time, I didn't know what the hell it was," he says. "I just knew it was the most beautiful thing. And it's been all downhill ever since." As it turns out, the Baltimore-born naturalist was meant not only to marvel over birds, but to infect others with his passion.
NEWS
By ROBERT LEE HOTZ and ROBERT LEE HOTZ,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 7, 2006
In one of Asia's most isolated jungles, the Foja Mountains of western New Guinea, naturalists have discovered a vast unexplored preserve of exotic species new to science. Among the previously unknown species researchers found during a 15-day expedition in December were more than 20 species of frogs, five palms and four butterflies. They also found hundreds of rare birds and giant rhododendrons with white blossoms the size of bread plates, believed to be the largest on record. All told, the 3,700 square miles of mist-shrouded tropical forest might be the most pristine natural area in Asia and the Pacific, Conservation International announced in Indonesia today.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2004
What ever happened to the White Warty Back? The Lined Pocketbook? The Coosa Elk Toe? That's what Arthur Bogan wants to know. For 18 years, he's been looking for these creatures - all species of freshwater mussel that were once plentiful in Southeastern rivers and streams. Bogan has looked all over, without success, and suspects the species are extinct, victims of pollution, and dams that choke the bivalves with silt. But looking for mussels is tricky work. Bogan sometimes snorkels, or uses a glass-bottomed bucket.
NEWS
By ROBERT LEE HOTZ and ROBERT LEE HOTZ,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 7, 2006
In one of Asia's most isolated jungles, the Foja Mountains of western New Guinea, naturalists have discovered a vast unexplored preserve of exotic species new to science. Among the previously unknown species researchers found during a 15-day expedition in December were more than 20 species of frogs, five palms and four butterflies. They also found hundreds of rare birds and giant rhododendrons with white blossoms the size of bread plates, believed to be the largest on record. All told, the 3,700 square miles of mist-shrouded tropical forest might be the most pristine natural area in Asia and the Pacific, Conservation International announced in Indonesia today.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | March 17, 1991
Now that the fighting is over in the Persian Gulf, the United States reigns as the lone undisputed superpower, and the old East-West way of looking at the world is obsolete. What comes next?Russell A. Mittermeier, president of Conservation International, an innovative environmental group based in Washington, D.C., has an urgent suggestion -- a more comprehensive view of the world that takes into account the volatile gap between the economic "haves" and "have nots." Traditionally, that gap has been cast in terms of a north-south split.
NEWS
By Edward Hegstrom and Edward Hegstrom,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | June 8, 1997
SAN JOSE PETEN, Guatemala - Norman B. Schwartz, professor of anthropology at the University of Delaware, this summer is visiting the front lines of what he sees as a vast cultural struggle playing out in the Peten region of Guatemala.Schwartz, a cultural anthropologist, has been interested in the region since his graduate school days at the University of Pennsylvania, where he received his doctorate in anthropology in 1968. He has worked and studied in the area, returning there this month, and is the author of "Forest Society, a Social History of Peten, Guatemala," published in 1991 by the University of Pennsylvania Press.
FEATURES
By Susan McGrath and Susan McGrath,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | November 27, 1991
The subject is bats, again, because a surprisingly large and impressive group of readers appears to be passionate about bats, one way or another.Not long ago I suggested that people help compensate for bats' shrinking habitat by putting up bat houses, which are much like bird houses. The column raised quite a squeal, first from the anti- and then from the pro-battists. Bat facts have been darting past my head at such speed that I think a few have gotten tangled in my hair.So here's what we're going to do: Present both sides of the story.
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | October 31, 1991
I KNOW a lot about bats. It's not as if I'm Merlin D. Tuttle, but I do know more than your average layman about roosting and hibernation, mating and echolocation, the Mexican free-tailed and the naked bulldog, the pipistrelles and the rousettes, the pollinators and the insectivores.Until last year I was afraid of bats, as so many people are, and I couldn't tell a flying fox from a Flying Wallenda. But that was before I was asked to read "America's Neighborhood Bats" aloud. Before Santa Claus got a request for a bat detector.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2004
What ever happened to the White Warty Back? The Lined Pocketbook? The Coosa Elk Toe? That's what Arthur Bogan wants to know. For 18 years, he's been looking for these creatures - all species of freshwater mussel that were once plentiful in Southeastern rivers and streams. Bogan has looked all over, without success, and suspects the species are extinct, victims of pollution, and dams that choke the bivalves with silt. But looking for mussels is tricky work. Bogan sometimes snorkels, or uses a glass-bottomed bucket.
NEWS
By Julie Cart and Julie Cart,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 8, 2004
Despite international efforts to promote biodiversity, a new study has found that hundreds of the world's animal species are in imminent danger of extinction, primarily in tropical mountains and islands in developing nations. The report, published yesterday in the journal Nature, concludes that although more than 10 percent of the Earth's land mass is afforded environmental protections, efforts are not being focused in places that have the greatest concentration of imperiled species. The "global gap analysis" conducted by scientists for Conservation International studied mammals, amphibians, birds, turtles and tortoises - which together represent just 1 percent of the planet's species.
NEWS
By Edward Hegstrom and Edward Hegstrom,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | June 8, 1997
SAN JOSE PETEN, Guatemala - Norman B. Schwartz, professor of anthropology at the University of Delaware, this summer is visiting the front lines of what he sees as a vast cultural struggle playing out in the Peten region of Guatemala.Schwartz, a cultural anthropologist, has been interested in the region since his graduate school days at the University of Pennsylvania, where he received his doctorate in anthropology in 1968. He has worked and studied in the area, returning there this month, and is the author of "Forest Society, a Social History of Peten, Guatemala," published in 1991 by the University of Pennsylvania Press.
FEATURES
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,Contributing Writer | May 24, 1992
The trail leads deep into a Southeast Asian tropical rain forest, a steamy jungle with lush vegetation that closes in around us. We brush aside the dangling vines and peer through the trees for any signs of life.From the distance white-cheeked gibbons approach, swinging through the treetops. A silvered leaf monkey perched on high cuddles her tiny youngster, whose bright orange fur makes him easy to see if the troop must flee.In a nearby mangrove swamp, a family of proboscis monkeys is busily playing, arguing, resting and tending their young at water's edge.
FEATURES
By Susan McGrath and Susan McGrath,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | November 27, 1991
The subject is bats, again, because a surprisingly large and impressive group of readers appears to be passionate about bats, one way or another.Not long ago I suggested that people help compensate for bats' shrinking habitat by putting up bat houses, which are much like bird houses. The column raised quite a squeal, first from the anti- and then from the pro-battists. Bat facts have been darting past my head at such speed that I think a few have gotten tangled in my hair.So here's what we're going to do: Present both sides of the story.
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | October 31, 1991
I KNOW a lot about bats. It's not as if I'm Merlin D. Tuttle, but I do know more than your average layman about roosting and hibernation, mating and echolocation, the Mexican free-tailed and the naked bulldog, the pipistrelles and the rousettes, the pollinators and the insectivores.Until last year I was afraid of bats, as so many people are, and I couldn't tell a flying fox from a Flying Wallenda. But that was before I was asked to read "America's Neighborhood Bats" aloud. Before Santa Claus got a request for a bat detector.
FEATURES
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,Contributing Writer | May 24, 1992
The trail leads deep into a Southeast Asian tropical rain forest, a steamy jungle with lush vegetation that closes in around us. We brush aside the dangling vines and peer through the trees for any signs of life.From the distance white-cheeked gibbons approach, swinging through the treetops. A silvered leaf monkey perched on high cuddles her tiny youngster, whose bright orange fur makes him easy to see if the troop must flee.In a nearby mangrove swamp, a family of proboscis monkeys is busily playing, arguing, resting and tending their young at water's edge.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | March 17, 1991
Now that the fighting is over in the Persian Gulf, the United States reigns as the lone undisputed superpower, and the old East-West way of looking at the world is obsolete. What comes next?Russell A. Mittermeier, president of Conservation International, an innovative environmental group based in Washington, D.C., has an urgent suggestion -- a more comprehensive view of the world that takes into account the volatile gap between the economic "haves" and "have nots." Traditionally, that gap has been cast in terms of a north-south split.
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