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NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2000
With nearly $6 million in state and federal funds earmarked to assist its preservation efforts, the Conservation Fund is negotiating to purchase the 300-acre Holly Beach Farm near Sandy Point State Park. Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced this week that $2 million from the state Department of Transportation and $2 million from the Department of Natural Resource's Program Open Space would be added to $2 million from the National Park Service to buy the forest and wetlands on the Holly Beach property if the sale went through.
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NEWS
March 28, 2013
We commend President Barack Obama for designating the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Monument ("A monument to Md. abolitionist," March 26). Just days after the centennial of her death, Harriet Tubman is finally receiving the national recognition she deserves as a heroic conductor on the Underground Railroad and an early leader for women's rights. The National Monument will include locations in Caroline, Dorchester, and Talbot counties, complimenting the Tubman State Park which broke ground for the construction of a world-class visitor's center on March 9. The landscapes of Ms. Tubman's birthplace and her early life on the Eastern Shore are a vital part of the Chesapeake's story that will now be conserved and interpreted for current and future generations, providing a major draw for travelers and economic development.
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NEWS
May 24, 1998
MARYLAND would benefit significantly from the president's plan to spend $700 million to acquire private pockets of "irreplaceable lands" in the nation's parks, forests and other public lands.Land adjacent to Antietam and Monocacy Civil War battlefields and Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, as well as scattered Maryland links in the Appalachian Trail, would be purchased.The money was authorized in the 1998 balanced budget agreement. But months after President Clinton submitted a list of 100 natural and historic sites for acquisition from the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund, key lawmakers are refusing to release the funds.
NEWS
April 2, 2012
Unless the House of Delegates reverses a Senate decision, Maryland's legislature will undermine the widely popular effort to create new places for outdoor recreation, as well as efforts to protect Maryland's best farmlands and forests. This decision would impact Maryland's residents and visitors alike by taking money set aside for land conservation and using it instead to pay for storm water projects. The Senate voted to raid all the land conservation programs. They took $26 million of the Program Open Space money, took money that was supposed to be paid back to Program Open Space and the Maryland Agricultural Land Protection Foundation, and completely defunded the Rural Legacy program.
NEWS
December 8, 2000
NOT EVERYONE is in love with Gov. Parris N. Glendening's sweeping Smart Growth program. But the Rural Legacy component, which helps localities protect significant environmental, agricultural and historic lands from development, has been an overwhelming success. In the first three years, the state has committed $82 million to protecting some 47,000 acres in 20 of Maryland's 23 counties. Despite initial reservations, counties are fighting for the state matching funds. They submitted plans for projects that would cost four times the $29 million available the first year of funding, and demand continues to be strong.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1999
Lawyers for Maryland, the Conservation Fund and the Hancock Timber group completed a purchase yesterday that will preserve 58,000 acres of Eastern Shore forest and wetland, the largest land acquisition in state history.The purchase is part of a complex deal to save 76,000 acres in parcels scattered across the Delmarva peninsula. The land was formerly owned by Chesapeake Forest Products Co.Under the agreement, negotiated by the Conservation Fund, Maryland took title yesterday to 29,000 acres for $16.5 million; the Richard King Mellon Foundation bought the remaining 29,000 acres in Maryland, while Sustainable Conservation Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Conservation Fund, purchased about 9,000 acres each in Delaware and Virginia.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2001
The state Board of Public Works approved a $7.2 million deal yesterday to preserve more than 300 acres of forests, marshes and farmland on the Chesapeake Bay just south of the Bay Bridge. The purchase of Holly Beach Farm, financed mostly with federal money, prevents development on three miles of bay shoreline from the bridge to Whitehall Creek. It also protects a great blue heron rookery with two dozen nesting pairs, two bald eagle nests, migratory shorebird habitat, a deer herd and dozens of osprey.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1999
If you bought or sold land in the past year, chances are you are contributing to the state's acquisition of vast tracts of wetland and forest on the Eastern Shore to protect them from development. The deal, made public yesterday, is expected to be completed this month.Funds for the state's share in purchasing the 58,000 acres from the Virginia-based Chesapeake Forest Products Co. -- $16.5 million -- are coming from Program Open Space, a seemingly endless source of cash used to buy land to protect it from development.
NEWS
March 19, 1991
HAGERSTOWN -- Conservationists launched a fund-raising campaign yesterday to buy 23 acres of Civil War history in Maryland near Harpers Ferry National Historical Park.During the Civil War, Union soldiers manned a battery of heavy artillery at the Spur Battery to protect against Confederate attacks from the north. The property was given its name because it is on a descending spur of a mountain across the Potomac River from Harpers Ferry, W.Va."The Spur Battery is one of the most significant fortification sites at Harpers Ferry," said James I. Robertson Jr., a Civil War historian and author at Virginia Polytechnic Institute in Blacksburg, Va. "Its booming cannons helped thwart Confederate advances against Maryland Heights in 1864."
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 7, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- State officials approved yesterday the acquisition of 2,360 acres of marshland in southern Dorchester County to be set aside as waterfowl habitat.In addition, representatives of the private, non-profit Conservation Fund announced their intention to donate another 2,085 acres in Dorchester and Somerset counties to the state to be similarly maintained.The combined 4,445 acres, which include large stretches of marsh, tidal creeks, ponds and scattered upland islands, will be part of a system of more than 44,000 acres of wetland in Dorchester, Wicomico and Somerset counties preserved for wildlife conservation.
NEWS
By Nat Williams | July 26, 2010
The future of America's great outdoors is in the hands of Congress this week. On Wednesday, it is likely both the House and the Senate will have a historic opportunity to support and reinvigorate the nation's key program for protecting our lands and waters. Since 1965, the Land and Water Conservation Fund has been instrumental in preserving iconic national landmarks, wildlife refuges, working farms and ranches, and state and local parks. With America now losing 3 million acres every year to development, ensuring full funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund is more critical than ever.
NEWS
By Lisa Silverman and Lisa Silverman,Sun reporter | December 21, 2007
Giavanna Parmer, a senior at Howard High School, has been concerned about the environment for as long as she can remember. She has tried to be environmentally friendly, while encouraging others to do the same. "I've always really cared about the environment," Parmer said. "A lot of people don't know the dangers it faces." Parmer's passion for the environment pushed her to find a way to make a difference. Last month, she decided to start her school's first Adopt an Animal program, sponsored by the Defenders of Wildlife, a conservation program based in Washington.
NEWS
By Craig W. Culp | May 3, 2007
Just down the street and around the corner from my home is a little patch of paradise next to the Potomac River and the C&O Canal National Historic Park. Its sunny glades edge up to a clear, crawfish-filled creek that rushes around islands of perfect skipping stones. Its woods echo with the call of pileated woodpeckers and the bark of foxes. It is a place my family cherishes, and we visit often for picnicking, hiking, fishing or roasting marshmallows.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | September 24, 2005
Betty Leslie-Melville, an unconventional conservationist who dedicated much of her life to protecting the once-imperiled Rothschild's giraffe, died yesterday of a type of dementia at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Roland Park resident was 78. Known as the Giraffe Lady, she founded the African Fund for Endangered Wildlife USA after settling in Kenya nearly 40 years ago. She worked to save the endangered Rothschild's giraffe, one of three subspecies of the gangly, treetop-munching animal known for its immense size and snow-white legs.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2005
Baltimore's mayor and representatives of the five metropolitan counties announced yesterday a new strategy for buying electricity that the officials hope will save millions of dollars for the local governments. Meeting as the Baltimore Metropolitan Council, the elected executives approved a plan to collectively buy energy more directly from electricity providers. "It's an innovative approach and a demonstration of our collective strength when applied to joint programs," said Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr., chairman of the metro council.
TOPIC
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2005
EIGHT YEARS after Maryland officially embraced Smart Growth as a development policy, farmland and forests continue to give way to houses, schools and malls with depressing regularity. Maryland is at a crossroads, argues Edward T. McMahon . What makes the state special, he says - the Chesapeake Bay, Southern Maryland tobacco barns, Civil War battlefields and forested mountainsides - is fading amid the voracious spread of subdivisions, strip malls and office parks. While the state's population grew 37 percent from 1970 to 2000, he notes, the amount of developed land more than doubled.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1998
The Board of Public Works approved spending $2 million more in state funds yesterday to help Queen Anne's County buy 675 acres with three miles of shoreline on the Corsica and Chester rivers.The Conservation Fund -- a national nonprofit land conservation group -- also is providing $2 million in federal grants through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for the project. Other state and county funds total $690,000.Ted Moeller, president of the Queen Anne's County commissioners, said the acquisition will nearly double the county's parks and recreation land and will protect a unique site, known as Conquest Farms, from development.
NEWS
November 17, 2001
A VALUABLE swath of Chester River wetlands, woodlands and fields will be spared from the onslaught of development in fast-growing, suburban Queen Anne's County. Delmarva fox squirrel, waterfowl and other wildlife can continue to roam the 5,000 acres of Chino Farms under a permanent easement brokered by the nonprofit Conservation Fund. Federal, state and county funds of $8 million are protecting the open land owned by the Harry Sears family just upriver from Chestertown. It is the largest single easement negotiated in Maryland, one that not only protects endangered and rare species but also preserves a potentially vulnerable stretch of Chester River shoreline.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2004
Today the Conservation Fund, a national group that has protected 200,000 acres in the Chesapeake region, will announce the purchase of Garrett Island near the mouth of the Susquehanna River. Threatened in the 1990s by development, the mile-long, forested island has been held for the past few years by the Cecil Land Trust and private investors while the search continued for a way to put it in public ownership. The $750,000 deal brokered by the Conservation Fund will turn over the island next year to Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2003
IT'S often said, and true, that even the best efforts to repair Chesapeake Bay can never restore the place as it was when Capt. John Smith first explored and charted it in 1607. Indeed, Smith's words, "Heaven and earth never agreed better to frame a place for man's habitation," have come almost to haunt us. Human inhabitation of the bay's six-state watershed grew to about 8 million between 1607 and 1950, then nearly doubled, to 15.7 million during the past 50 years. About a million more each decade are projected to swell the ranks.
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