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By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2004
THE IDEA that the Maryland Department of Natural Resources is considering the sale of pieces of state-owned land totaling 3,000 acres has enflamed environmental advocates who fear that the Ehrlich administration is endangering treasured public spaces in a period of relentless development sprawl. But some experts say that private ownership of land is not necessarily incompatible with preserving Maryland's rural landscape. These free-market environmentalists point to tools such as conservation easements and the proliferation of land trusts as proof that a robust market exists for preservation.
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NEWS
April 6, 2013
The Maryland Senate has once again voted to cut the state's land conservation programs by $16 million. Not only are we disappointed by the lack of respect for this important, dedicated funding source, but these cuts are disproportionately targeted toward programs, including the Maryland Agricultural Land Preservation Fund (MALPF) and the Rural Legacy Program, which benefit the farming community. MALPF and Rural Legacy allow farmers to put conservation easements on large blocks of working land, thus protecting the natural, agricultural, forestry, and environmental resources within the area.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 8, 1998
A national census by Land Trust Alliance, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit group, shows that Maryland environmental groups have preserved 93,114 acres through conservation easements or land purchases since the 1980s.Nationally, 4.7 million acres are preserved -- a 135 percent increase since 1988, when a grass-roots push to contain sprawl and halt development began, the census said.Pub Date: 10/08/98
EXPLORE
October 13, 2012
    Carroll County's Agricultural Lands Preservation Program has been awarded $618,000 through the Maryland Rural Legacy Program for preserving farmland or natural lands. The county will use the funds to buy conservation easements from willing sellers within designated areas. The easements reserve property from future development, but the land remains in private ownership. The owner is compensated for essentially "retiring" the development potential on the land. The Maryland Rural Legacy Program was created in 1998 to preserve large contiguous areas of rural land.
NEWS
November 16, 2004
An article in Saturday's editions said the state Department of Natural Resources is considering the sale of 3,000 acres of land, including 584 acres that form a buffer zone around Deep Creek Lake in Garrett County. Because of an editing error, a sentence was deleted that said any construction on this Deep Creek parcel is prohibited by conservation easements and the land is being offered to adjacent property owners under a several-years-old agreement, according to Anne Hubbard, a spokeswoman for the state Department of General Services.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | June 29, 1994
The Anne Arundel County Council is considering offering county property tax exemptions for land in local conservation trusts.If the measure is adopted Tuesday night, Anne Arundel would be the second county in the state to use a financial incentive to encourage people to leave their forests, meadows and other land undeveloped. The measure is possible under a state law that took effect July 1991. The Harford County Council enacted a similar measure June 21. To be eligible, the land would have to be used for environmental education, to promote conservation, help preserve a natural area, or maintain a wildlife sanctuary.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1999
Eight years old and 40 members strong, the Carroll County Land Trust hopes to post its first milestone this year -- preserving 1,000 acres of rich, historic land from rapid sprawl.The nonprofit group, which operates from the home of a former Carroll planning director, has joined forces with the county's Agricultural Land Preservation Program in a goal to save 100,000 acres from development.Members will soon embark on a fund-raising campaign that features an old-fashioned "road show" depicting slides of bucolic Carroll farms threatened by bulldozers.
NEWS
By Sally Voris and Sally Voris,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 5, 1999
THE IMMEDIATE neighbors are not the only local residents dismayed as fields and woodlands are transformed into housing developments.Last week's column recounted the anguish of people on each side of one new project near Rockburn Elementary School, Rockburn Run -- Polly and Joe Thornton, and Mary and Earl Strain.The column prompted a call from Patrick O'Brien, who with deep emotion told of growing up in the area on his family's land -- and how he was glad he was not there to see the house where he had grown up come down.
NEWS
April 15, 2004
The Howard County Conservancy will present its annual Earth Day Celebration from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 24 at its headquarters, Mount Pleasant, 10520 Old Frederick Road, in Woodstock. Participants, who should take a picnic lunch, can plant trees, clear invasive non-native species, clean up and mulch trails on the 232-acre nature reserve. An opportunity to hike on nature trails is planned. A bird walk is planned from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. Tree-planting and cleanup will be from 9 a.m. to noon.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 27, 2000
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. -- The pretrial litigation has reached the five-year mark with depositions and arguments ever growing in Dickensian stacks dense enough to make the judge cry out. "This court has been submerged," complained Judge James Michael here in U.S. District Court. "No more of these 180-page briefs," he ordered the battery of lawyers, as he applied a firm hand to one of the more enigmatic environmental lawsuits inching its way across a highly valued corner of the nation. The civil suit involves a group of preservationists in a rustic antebellum enclave of Louisa County and two strip-mining companies, but not in the usual configuration.
TOPIC
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2004
THE IDEA that the Maryland Department of Natural Resources is considering the sale of pieces of state-owned land totaling 3,000 acres has enflamed environmental advocates who fear that the Ehrlich administration is endangering treasured public spaces in a period of relentless development sprawl. But some experts say that private ownership of land is not necessarily incompatible with preserving Maryland's rural landscape. These free-market environmentalists point to tools such as conservation easements and the proliferation of land trusts as proof that a robust market exists for preservation.
NEWS
November 16, 2004
An article in Saturday's editions said the state Department of Natural Resources is considering the sale of 3,000 acres of land, including 584 acres that form a buffer zone around Deep Creek Lake in Garrett County. Because of an editing error, a sentence was deleted that said any construction on this Deep Creek parcel is prohibited by conservation easements and the land is being offered to adjacent property owners under a several-years-old agreement, according to Anne Hubbard, a spokeswoman for the state Department of General Services.
NEWS
April 15, 2004
The Howard County Conservancy will present its annual Earth Day Celebration from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 24 at its headquarters, Mount Pleasant, 10520 Old Frederick Road, in Woodstock. Participants, who should take a picnic lunch, can plant trees, clear invasive non-native species, clean up and mulch trails on the 232-acre nature reserve. An opportunity to hike on nature trails is planned. A bird walk is planned from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. Tree-planting and cleanup will be from 9 a.m. to noon.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2003
Far beyond the edges of Harford County's designated growth areas, developers are quietly moving in on agricultural areas in the northern tier and developing residential communities next to farms committed to conservation, further straining a struggling agricultural community, say some farmers and officials. The key to developers' success is capitalizing on a loosely worded county law allowing the transfer of development rights from one property to another - legislation written in the 1980s to help farmers keep their land while leveraging revenue from it. Today, that law allows developers to hopscotch these rights from other areas, sometimes across land parcels too small to accommodate the development rights, and land them on properties abutting farms with conservation easements - a selling point for the developer but a potential nightmare for farmers who can become boxed in by houses and traffic as they try to keep their farms viable.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2003
Far beyond the edges of Harford County's designated growth areas, developers are quietly moving in on agricultural areas in the northern tier and developing residential communities next to farms committed to conservation, further straining a struggling agricultural community, say some farmers and officials. The key to developers' success is capitalizing on a loosely worded county law allowing the transfer of development rights from one property to another - legislation written in the 1980s to help farmers keep their land while leveraging revenue from it. Today, that law allows developers to hopscotch these rights from other areas, sometimes across land parcels too small to accommodate the development rights, and land them on properties abutting farms with conservation easements - a selling point for the developer but a potential nightmare for farmers who can become boxed in by houses and traffic as they try to keep their farms viable.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2002
Environmentalists have long eyed the peaceful, forested green space at the heart of Anne Arundel's most heavily industrialized area, worrying that it could be lost to development. Now the tract of more than 100 acres on the banks of the Patapsco River is a permanently protected part of the landscape on the Marley Neck peninsula. In its first major acquisition, the North County Land Trust has secured a conservation easement on the Swan Creek site owned by the Maryland Port Administration, ensuring the preservation of the land, which contains wetlands and habitat for wildlife and waterfowl.
EXPLORE
October 13, 2012
    Carroll County's Agricultural Lands Preservation Program has been awarded $618,000 through the Maryland Rural Legacy Program for preserving farmland or natural lands. The county will use the funds to buy conservation easements from willing sellers within designated areas. The easements reserve property from future development, but the land remains in private ownership. The owner is compensated for essentially "retiring" the development potential on the land. The Maryland Rural Legacy Program was created in 1998 to preserve large contiguous areas of rural land.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2002
The Carroll County commissioners agreed yesterday to buy protective equipment for a handful of public health workers who would be called upon to handle biological threats, such as anthrax. Six disease-control specialists who work with the county Health Department are on call and will be equipped soon with suits and hoods. They will have the gear with them at all times in case of an emergency. "If there is ever a bioterrorism issue, the police would call the Health Department, who would in turn call someone trained in biohazards," said county budget director Steve Powell, who oversees Carroll's risk-management efforts.
NEWS
December 16, 2001
Coming to the defense of Nancy Smith, Blandair As one who knew Nancy Smith for 28 years and who worked with her on plans to preserve Blandair Farm for 14 of those years, I would like to set the record straight by answering the letter from John McGing ("Nancy Smith to blame for Blandair's problems," Dec. 9). Until her mother's death in 1979, Miss Smith thought the farm would be preserved by being tied up in her father's life estate. When she realized the life estate would not provide the protection she required, she began looking for other means.
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