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Consent Decree

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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 16, 2002
A consent decree has been sent to U.S. District Court to resolve a sexual harassment lawsuit filed last year against the White Marsh Double T Diner, the Baltimore District Office of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission announced yesterday. The suit, filed in June, alleges that diner waitresses were sexually harassed by way of touching and sexually suggestive, lurid and derogatory comments. Those who complained were berated, fired or felt they had to quit because of the working conditions, according to the suit.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration settled a discrimination complaint brought by the U.S. Department of Justice, agreeing to ensure that hiring follows rules that forbid asking most job candidates to take medical exams. The Justice Department had accused the city of violating the Americans with Disabilities Act after the Fire Department refused to hire a candidate for a dispatcher position when a medical exam revealed that she had a disability. The city agreed to pay the woman $65,000 and to ensure its hiring policies and practices follow the law, according to a consent decree filed with a complaint in U.S. District Court on Wednesday.
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BUSINESS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | May 17, 2008
WASHINGTON - A Columbia drug company and its top executives have agreed to stop making prescription cough and cold products after repeated failures to pass federal inspections and get government approval of the medicines. Scientific Laboratories Inc. Chief Executive Officer Amit Roy and President Rajeshwari Patel signed a consent decree in U.S. District Court in Baltimore earlier this month. The company had been making various drugs for other pharmaceutical companies, which then sold the products under their own labels.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 30, 2013
A federal judge has denied - for now, at least - Blue Water Baltimor e's bid to intervene in the city's effort to delay its court-decreed deadline for fixing the pervasive sewage leaks that foul local streams and Baltimore's harbor. In a brief five-sentence ruling filed earlier this month, U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz declared "untimely" the environmental group's motion to participate in talks between city officials and federal and state regulators over the 2002 consent decree requiring Baltimore to fix its largest sewage overflows.  The city  has estimated it would spend $1 billion upgrading the sewer system by the deadline, 2016.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2000
Threatening legal action against the state, Baltimore's school board hired outside legal counsel this week to negotiate with the governor for more money for the city's school reform effort. If the negotiations fail, the board says, it will go to court immediately -- reopening a case that was settled several years ago with a consent decree that created a city-state partnership to run the schools. The school board hired Wilbur D. Preston Jr., a partner in Whiteford, Taylor and Preston, to represent the board in its negotiations.
NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | November 19, 1990
The Annapolis City Council will decide tonight whether to extend a 1984 court order calling for minority hiring and promotion in the police department.The order, called a consent decree, has been extended three times and is set to expire next month.The 6-year-old order resulted from a lawsuit by the Black Officers Association charging discrimination in the department. When the decree was issued, 11 percent of the department's officers were black and 7 percent were women. The decree calls for 25 percent of the department's officers to be black and 16 percent to be women.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
The new owner of the Sparrows Point steel mill has agreed to pay a $135,000 penalty and resolve alleged violations of state pollution control laws that occurred in 2009 when part of a blast furnace ignited, state officials announced Thursday. RG Steel Sparrows LLC, which purchased Sparrows Point in April, has signed an agreement with the Maryland Department of the Environment, or MDE, and the Maryland Office of the Attorney General to reduce emissions from the blast furnace. The money will go to the Maryland Clean Air Fund.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1997
After more than a decade under federal court supervision, four of Maryland's oldest prisons have been freed from consent decrees governing their populations and conditions, prompting concern from inmate advocates yesterday.The termination of the decrees is part of a national pattern after passage in Congress of the Prison Litigation Reform Act of 1995, which restricts the extent to which federal courts can intervene in the management of state prisons.The act provides for "immediate" termination of consent decrees considered to be overly broad.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2004
When Annapolis city leaders agreed to a federal consent decree in 1986 to more than double the number of black firefighters in the Fire Department within five years, they thought it would end a long-simmering court dispute over hiring. But nearly two decades later, city officials are grappling with the contentious issue again. City officials had promised a federal judge that they would try to boost the percentage of black firefighters to about 25 percent by 1991. But the share of black firefighters has dropped since 1986, from 12 percent to about 9 percent today.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Evening Sun Staff | October 10, 1991
Seven years after black police officers filed suit against the city of Annapolis, an alderman says the police department has made enough progress in hiring and promoting minorities that a federal consent decree will be allowed to expire at the end of 1991.The decree was extended three times over the years, but a fourth extension will not be needed, said Alderman Carl O. Snowden, D-5, and Detective George Kelley, head of the Black Officers Association, who held a joint news conference yesterday.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2013
The operator of three coal-fired power plants in Maryland has agreed to pay a total of $2.2 million in penalties and fix long-standing pollution problems at the landfills in Southern Maryland and Montgomery County where it disposes of the ash from those plants, according to court documents. In a proposed consent decree filed recently in U.S. District Court, subsidiaries of GenOn Energy, a Houston power company, agreed to settle lawsuits by Maryland and environmental groups alleging that the company's Brandywine, Faulkner and Westland coal-ash landfills have been polluting groundwater and nearby streams.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2012
Baltimore County has agreed to pay about $500,000 and reform workplace practices to settle a federal lawsuit accusing officials of discrimination against 10 Police and Fire Department employees and job applicants, chiefly on the basis of medical conditions, according to court documents. The U.S. Department of Justice on Tuesday filed a 28-page complaint against the county in U.S. District Court and a 20-page agreement to settle the allegations rather than pursue them to a trial. The government accused the county of "a pattern or practice of discrimination" in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act against eight uniformed and civilian employees and two job applicants.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2012
For the fourth consecutive year, Baltimore officials are proposing a 9 percent increase to water and sewer rates — and the charges will continue to grow indefinitely to cover the costs of major projects, they say. The proposed rate increases come as the Department of Public Works has been grappling with high-profile billing problems that have been attributed to faulty water meters, outdated computer programs and, in some neighborhoods, fictitious meter...
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
A federal court judge has approved a settlement between Ocean City and a spray paint artist, changing the town code so that it no longer violates the free-speech rights of street performers. On Monday, U.S. District Court Judge L. Ellen Hollander signed the consent decree, which was submitted by both parties last week. It allows writers, painters, performers, sculptors, musicians and others to sell their works along the boardwalk without fear of interference by police. Those who sell manufactured goods such as candles, stuffed animals and sunglasses are not included in the protected class.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2012
Ocean City has agreed not to enforce provisions in its town code that could be construed as violating the free-speech rights of street performers under a proposed consent decree filed in federal court Friday. If a judge accepts the terms, writers, painters, performers, sculptors, musicians and others would be able to sell their works along the boardwalk without fear of interference by police. Those who sell manufactured goods such as candles, stuffed animals and sunglasses are not included in the protected class.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
The new owner of the Sparrows Point steel mill has agreed to pay a $135,000 penalty and resolve alleged violations of state pollution control laws that occurred in 2009 when part of a blast furnace ignited, state officials announced Thursday. RG Steel Sparrows LLC, which purchased Sparrows Point in April, has signed an agreement with the Maryland Department of the Environment, or MDE, and the Maryland Office of the Attorney General to reduce emissions from the blast furnace. The money will go to the Maryland Clean Air Fund.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2002
THE DISCLOSURE last week that a dozen homes have been selected to give a few public housing tenants in Baltimore the opportunity to move out of the impoverished inner city as part of a court decree raises two related questions. First, have the demographics of the neighborhoods in which the homes will be located changed significantly since the 1990 census, from which data were used to identify eligible communities: those that were (a) predominantly white and (b) only slightly poor. Second, to what extent does it matter if they have?
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2011
In a ruling that's left Dundalk-area residents shaking their heads, a federal court has declared that recent owners of the century-old steel-making complex at Sparrows Point can't be made to clean up past contamination of surrounding waters. U.S. District Court Judge J. Frederick Motz ruled that under the terms of a 2003 bankruptcy sale of the steel mill, the company that bought Sparrows Point from Bethlehem Steel Corp. could not be held liable for any pollution that escaped the 2,300-acre peninsula before that sale.
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