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NEWS
March 3, 1996
AFTER THE SOVIET COLLAPSE, the U.S., Britain and (West) Germany reduced their military expenditure, armaments and manpower. France did not. It retained a vision of grandeur, along with a cultural nationalism that has no counterpart in American political life.Now President Jacques Chirac has determined to bring France militarily into the 21st Century, if not the 20th. He will end the draft, introduced by Napoleon Bonaparte 198 years ago and steadily in effect since 1905, by the year 2002. Military forces will be reduced from 500,000 to 350,000.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | August 10, 2007
Dr. Gino Franco Luigi Zarbin, a Baltimore pediatrician whose love of children was equaled only by his enthusiasm for Alfa Romeo sports cars and model trains, died Monday of cancer at his Hillendale home. He was 83. Dr. Zarbin, the son of a dentist, was born and raised in Vittorio Veneto, Italy, and raised in Milan. Educated at the University of Milan, where he earned his medical degree in 1948, Dr. Zarbin escaped conscription into the German army during World War II when he missed his regular train.
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NEWS
By Laird B. Anderson | October 4, 1998
Now that the hype over the movie "Saving Private Ryan" has cooled, it's time to reflect on the men who stormed the shores in Europe and the Pacific during World War II, and the military draft, which ended 25 years ago.The draft's "Greetings" letter started in 1940 and called 93 percent of the 10.5 million men who served during World War II. The draft, the bugle call with origins dating to the citizen-soldier militia of the American Revolution, tore millions...
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 25, 2007
UNICEF permitted interviews with the children in this story only on condition that their real names not be used since they remain at risk of being targeted by militant groups. BUKAVU, Democratic Republic of the Congo -- The day his childhood ended, he was a 12-year-old boy playing cards with friends in his village. Then five gun-toting men appeared. As horrified parents looked on, the men marched the crying, barefoot boys single file into the world of child soldiering. Hers ended when she was just 10. Marauding soldiers had killed her uncle and scores of others in her village; they were looting and, she says, "doing everything."
NEWS
By JEFFREY RECORD | May 17, 1995
Atlanta. -- Napoleon declared that ''Victory goes to the big battalions.''To be sure, numerical superiority, especially if pronounced, has propelled many an army to victory. Beginning with the introduction of compulsory military service by revolutionary France two centuries ago, European, and later non-European, states adopted mass conscription as a means of maximizing the size of their armed forces.Indeed, conscription played a major role in the creation and preservation of the modern nation-state.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | August 10, 2007
Dr. Gino Franco Luigi Zarbin, a Baltimore pediatrician whose love of children was equaled only by his enthusiasm for Alfa Romeo sports cars and model trains, died Monday of cancer at his Hillendale home. He was 83. Dr. Zarbin, the son of a dentist, was born and raised in Vittorio Veneto, Italy, and raised in Milan. Educated at the University of Milan, where he earned his medical degree in 1948, Dr. Zarbin escaped conscription into the German army during World War II when he missed his regular train.
NEWS
November 1, 2004
SOME CRITICS of President Bush have tried to raise fears of a return to conscription if he is re-elected. He and his aides say it won't happen and that they have no interest in the idea at all. Viewed from their own perspective, there's no reason to doubt them. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld has made it clear that he favors a lean, mobile, skilled Army; in an unguarded moment a few years ago, the former Navy pilot disparaged the contribution of draftees to the Vietnam war effort. But as we have come to realize, that White House perspective on the world is hardly an undistorted one. The leaders of the Bush administration may not believe in a draft, but that doesn't mean that they won't be forced into creating one through the consequences of their foreign policy.
NEWS
February 21, 1991
Brandi Delly, age 11West Baltimore Middle School6th grade* QUESTION: Is this war all about oil?* ANSWER: The night the war began, President George Bush addressed the nation. Here's what he said that night about the country's reasons for going to war: "Our objectives are clear. Saddam Hussein's forces will leave Kuwait. The legitimate government of Kuwait will once again be free . . . when peace is restored, it is our hope that Iraq will live as a peaceful and cooperative member of the family of nations, thus enhancing the security and stability of the gulf."
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | October 4, 2004
ATLANTA - The Bush administration is trying to quash a rumor that keeps cropping up in cyberspace. For several months, e-mails from an unknown source have warned that President Bush plans to reinstitute the draft if he wins a second term. The rumor persists despite repeated denials from top-level administration figures. In Thursday's debate, President Bush declared that the U.S. military will remain an all-volunteer force. Secretary of State Colin L. Powell recently told ABC's George Stephanopoulos that "President Bush has no plans for a draft, nor is a draft needed."
NEWS
By Gregory D. Foster | December 13, 2004
WITH PRESIDENT Bush's re-election, we'll soon find out whether there is any truth to the rumors that have been circulating for some time that he and his administration want to reinstitute military conscription. And, presumably, we'll also find out whether those in Congress who have advocated a resumption of the draft - most notably Democratic Rep. Charles B. Rangel of New York - will push for or against such a measure. In the characteristic manner in which irony can be so ironic, an administration that has said the draft is unnecessary now could suddenly argue that one is necessary to sustain the burdensome war on terrorism.
NEWS
December 21, 2004
Bloodiest wars were waged by drafted armies Talk about dM-ijM-` vu. Gregory D. Foster's column "The case for a draft" (Opinion * Commentary, Dec. 13) made me feel like I had fallen through a time warp and landed back in the mid-1960s. The notion that a military draft would serve as a check on the political and military leadership's propensity to get us into inappropriate foreign misadventures was a stock argument of the advocates of conscription back then. Even the fact that our increasing entanglement in the Vietnam quagmire was giving the lie to that argument didn't seem to make a dent in their enthusiasm for involuntary service.
NEWS
By Gregory D. Foster | December 13, 2004
WITH PRESIDENT Bush's re-election, we'll soon find out whether there is any truth to the rumors that have been circulating for some time that he and his administration want to reinstitute military conscription. And, presumably, we'll also find out whether those in Congress who have advocated a resumption of the draft - most notably Democratic Rep. Charles B. Rangel of New York - will push for or against such a measure. In the characteristic manner in which irony can be so ironic, an administration that has said the draft is unnecessary now could suddenly argue that one is necessary to sustain the burdensome war on terrorism.
NEWS
November 1, 2004
SOME CRITICS of President Bush have tried to raise fears of a return to conscription if he is re-elected. He and his aides say it won't happen and that they have no interest in the idea at all. Viewed from their own perspective, there's no reason to doubt them. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld has made it clear that he favors a lean, mobile, skilled Army; in an unguarded moment a few years ago, the former Navy pilot disparaged the contribution of draftees to the Vietnam war effort. But as we have come to realize, that White House perspective on the world is hardly an undistorted one. The leaders of the Bush administration may not believe in a draft, but that doesn't mean that they won't be forced into creating one through the consequences of their foreign policy.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 21, 2004
MOSCOW - He was humiliated, robbed and beaten. All because he was drafted into the Russian army. Like thousands of conscripts, Andrei Baryakin had looked forward to serving his country. "I always wanted to be a paratrooper," said the 20-year-old from Nizhny Novgorod, an industrial city about 200 miles east of Moscow. "They are brave and courageous people." But the first morning Baryakin awoke in his barracks, he found that someone had stolen his shoes. Other draftees in the barracks had also been robbed by longer-serving comrades.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | October 4, 2004
ATLANTA - The Bush administration is trying to quash a rumor that keeps cropping up in cyberspace. For several months, e-mails from an unknown source have warned that President Bush plans to reinstitute the draft if he wins a second term. The rumor persists despite repeated denials from top-level administration figures. In Thursday's debate, President Bush declared that the U.S. military will remain an all-volunteer force. Secretary of State Colin L. Powell recently told ABC's George Stephanopoulos that "President Bush has no plans for a draft, nor is a draft needed."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - Despite continued opposition from Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, some lawmakers say it's time to bring back the draft, 31 years after it gave way to an all-volunteer force. They point to a stubborn insurgency in Iraq, an anti-terrorism war with no end in sight and the burden of that fight falling mostly to middle-class and low-income soldiers in an Army stretched thin. "We've never had a war like the one we have now," Rep. Charles B. Rangel said in an interview yesterday.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 10, 1999
PODGORICA, Yugoslavia -- Dragan Soc dares the Yugoslav army authorities to come and take him away.The 42-year-old father of two collects conscription notices like parking tickets. He gives interviews and sets himself up as one of this country's more famous draft dodgers, reasoning that if the army really wants him, it knows exactly where to reach him.Soc is Montenegro's justice minister."A few days ago, I told the army publicly, if they intend to judge people, start with me," Soc said yesterday.
NEWS
December 21, 2004
Bloodiest wars were waged by drafted armies Talk about dM-ijM-` vu. Gregory D. Foster's column "The case for a draft" (Opinion * Commentary, Dec. 13) made me feel like I had fallen through a time warp and landed back in the mid-1960s. The notion that a military draft would serve as a check on the political and military leadership's propensity to get us into inappropriate foreign misadventures was a stock argument of the advocates of conscription back then. Even the fact that our increasing entanglement in the Vietnam quagmire was giving the lie to that argument didn't seem to make a dent in their enthusiasm for involuntary service.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2004
The Vietnam-era draft cut a tornadolike swath through a generation of American men. "It was a crucible question, regardless of where you came down on the war in Vietnam," Alexander Bloom, a historian at Wheaton College in Massachusetts, says of the draft. "It was a question people who did not want to go to that war had to face - whether to go to Canada, to the resistance, to teach in an inner-city high school, whatever helped you stay out. It was not something you did casually." Those years have surfaced again with allegations about President Bush's service in the National Guard and heroic tales of war from opponent John Kerry's combat in Vietnam.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2003
Thirty years ago, when the United States was fighting the war in Vietnam, much of the peace movement revolved around the college campus. Then, anti-war protest was often associated with words like "counterculture" and "draft dodger." Today's protesters arrive from a different era, the age of a volunteer army. This week in New York, a well-dressed middle-age man was part of the protest. He bore a sign that read: Corporate Attorneys Against the War. When other demonstrators decided to make themselves heard, they blocked Fifth Avenue by staging a "die-in."
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