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NEWS
By Samuel Johnson Jr | August 12, 2014
The response to crises such as the 9/11 attacks, the Boston Marathon bombings or the landslide that collapsed a Baltimore street this spring inevitably elevate the public consciousness of the professionalism and courage of police, firefighters and other first responders. But sometimes a different kind of consciousness is raised. Corruption or lawless behavior by public-safety personnel - such as the shootings and looting by New Orleans police officers following Hurricane Katrina or, more recently, the police chokehold that killed an unarmed man on a Staten Island sidewalk, caught on video by members of the community - can undo all of that goodwill in a moment.
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NEWS
By Samuel Johnson Jr | August 12, 2014
The response to crises such as the 9/11 attacks, the Boston Marathon bombings or the landslide that collapsed a Baltimore street this spring inevitably elevate the public consciousness of the professionalism and courage of police, firefighters and other first responders. But sometimes a different kind of consciousness is raised. Corruption or lawless behavior by public-safety personnel - such as the shootings and looting by New Orleans police officers following Hurricane Katrina or, more recently, the police chokehold that killed an unarmed man on a Staten Island sidewalk, caught on video by members of the community - can undo all of that goodwill in a moment.
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NEWS
By LAURA BARNHARDT and LAURA BARNHARDT,SUN REPORTER | August 17, 2006
Two construction workers died yesterday after losing consciousness from an apparent lack of oxygen in a sewer manhole - one after jumping in to rescue the other at a construction site on Villa Julie College's Owings Mills campus. The worker who first went underground - to retrieve a dropped tool - was pulled out by firefighters, but died at a hospital, a Fire Department offical said. The would-be rescuer was dead at the scene. The men, who were not identified because police were trying to notify relatives, had been pouring concrete in the 10900 block of Boulevard Circle, said Elise Armacost, a Fire Department spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
As Nathan Reid wandered around his Canton neighborhood, he saw threats everywhere. Empty tree wells, weedy window boxes and flowers that bloomed and died before the end of summer - unkind conditions for the fuzzy, buzzing set. "I want homeowners to become more conscientious gardeners," he told a room full of his neighbors Sunday afternoon. "Honeybees depend on it. " The honeybee enthusiast - or honeybee steward, as he prefers to be called - gathered about 30 people in the basement of a church to emphasize the need to save the insects, which not only produce honey, but also pollinate plants and help in the growing of close to a third of the world's crops.
NEWS
By William B. Talbott and Frank D. Roylance and William B. Talbott and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | May 8, 1991
Before she lapsed into unconsciousness Saturday, her throat slashed several times by a knife, Julia Singletary named her boyfriend, Raymond Lee, as her attacker, police said.Critically injured, Singletary, 31, never regained consciousness, and at 4:12 p.m. yesterday she died at Sinai Hospital, becoming the city's 108th homicide victim.Early today, police went to Lee's home, in the 2100 block of N. Pulaski St., arrested him and charged him with first-degree murder and assault with a deadly weapon.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2001
Baltimore's police union lashed out yesterday at city prosecutors in the wake of a grand jury indictment of three officers on charges of assaulting a man they suspected was trying to swallow drugs. Gary McLhinney, president of the city's Fraternal Order of Police lodge, said State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy was politically motivated in bringing the case before the grand jury and was sending a "terrible message" to police officers and the public. "They need to concentrate on putting criminals in jail," he said.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | May 20, 2007
Chanting "Hare Krishna, Hare Krishna," hundreds of believers of the Hindu sect dragged a crimson 30-foot-high chariot cloaked in sunflowers, carnations and roses. Wrapped in colorful clothing, they marched down Light Street yesterday afternoon and ended in the Inner Harbor, stalling traffic and drawing curious stares. This was the local version of Rathayatra, an Indian religious chariot parade. Figures of the three Hindu deities -- Krishna, Balarama and Subhadra -- are taken from a temple and placed on the elaborately decorated chariot.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | January 11, 1991
DON'T MAKE the mistake of assuming that ''Awakenings'' is a comedy. It would be natural to do so. Penny Marshall directed, and Robin Williams and Robert De Niro co-star. Those names would suggest comedy.The new film does have laughs, but primarily, it is an adroit mixture of comedy and pathos, an almost totally satisfying experience, one that is neither upper nor downer. The story has been romanticized, but allowances can be made.''Awakenings'' is based on a book written in 1973 by Oliver Sacks, a doctor who found himself working at a hospital in the Bronx in the late '60s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Norah Vincent and By Norah Vincent,Special to the Sun | July 29, 2001
Mae West: An Icon in Black and White, by Jill Watts. Oxford University Press. 374 pages. $35. If the mere mention of that rusty triad of words so beloved of academics everywhere -- race, class and gender -- doesn't send you into immediate paroxysms of rage against the p.c. machine, then you won't be bothered in the least by Jill Watts' new biography of Mae West. And if you're sufficiently inured to that other irritating academics' tendency to shuttle all available information into the prescribed categories of a distinctly postmodernist worldview, then you'll have all your cherished notions about "subversiveness" gently reaffirmed by this book.
ENTERTAINMENT
By BEN NEIHART and BEN NEIHART,Special to the Sun | May 5, 2002
Mr. Potter, by Jamaica Kincaid. Farrar, Straus & Giroux. 195 pages. $18. I know it's a thuggish thing to ask, but I wonder how many readers there are, in 2002, for Jamaica Kincaid's prose. Let's start with the first sentence of Mr. Potter, her new novel: "And that day, the sun was in its usual place, up above and in the middle of the sky, and it shone in its usual way so harshly bright, making even the shadows pale, making even the shadows seek shelter; that day the sun was in its usual place, up above and in the middle of the sky, but Mr. Potter did not note this, so accustomed was he to this, the sun in its usual place, up above and in the middle of the sky" That's not the whole sentence, but it is more than half, and I wonder how many readers there are, in 2002, for that brand of lyricism, that repetition, in rhythm and word choice, with which Kincaid attempts to re-create consciousness itself, and resurrect her dead father, the titular Mr. Potter, whom she never knew.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
As the mother of boys, I usually don't get the chance to spend much time with tween or teen girls unless they have come to the house to visit my sons. But recently I chaperoned several eighth-grade girls on a weekend church retreat in Ocean City and I had a glimpse into their world. Like my boys, the girls are concerned about their appearances, but I was surprised at how self conscious the girls were about their bodies. The girls in my group had been friends for many years and had slept over at each other's houses.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2013
Although the traditional start to the holiday shopping season is still days away, Morgan Somerville has already mapped out her bargain-hunting strategy. The student employment manager at Stevenson University will pass up Thanksgiving specials to focus on Black Friday deals for gifts and household items for her new Towson home. On Small Business Saturday, she'll help out at her mother's gift shop. Then on Cyber Monday, she'll watch email and social media for deep discounts from retailers such as Vera Bradley.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
The CEO of New Belgium Brewing Co., a vice president of Etsy, an NAACP officer and even an Indian mystic found themselves in the same place this weekend in Baltimore: the convention of a socially conscious business organization. Social Venture Network, an international group of entrepreneurs and business leaders, conducted its fall conference at the Renaissance Harborplace Hotel this weekend. Stressing the need for an sustainable economy, the group offered a lineup of speakers - including representatives from Honest Tea, Indiegogo and Upworthy - and an agenda that included music, meditation and daily yoga sessions.
NEWS
August 26, 2013
The Maryland Center for Entrepreneurship, a program of Howard County's Economic Development Authority, will put up $800,000 to help start Conscious Venture Lab - a project officials say will help startup businesses that profess to serve the public good. "We want to foster companies that have both profit and strong values as part of their core mission," said County Executive Ken Ulman in a statement about the program, which is expected to launch in October with a call for applications.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | July 23, 2013
Students are relying more on grants and scholarships than Mom and Dad to pay for college, according to a study released today from Sallie Mae. In its annual study of “How America Pays for College,” the giant lender said free money in for the form of grants and scholarships now pays 30 percent of the college tab. Four years ago, it was 25 percent. Sallie Mae said students now receive an average of $6,355 in grants and scholarships, compared with $4,859  in 2009. In comparison, parents now kick in 27 percent of college costs or an average of $5,727.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2013
Police testified Tuesday that a Severn man, whose 5-year-old son lost consciousness last September after drinking methadone that the father acknowledged buying, waited more than an hour after the boy initially became ill to call for help because he "was scared. " The remark came as the trial of Paul K. Brooks Sr., 28, opened in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court. Brooks is facing child abuse and related charges. Three other charges in the case were dropped last month. In opening statements, defense attorney Peter S. O'Neill conceded neglect and "poor judgment," but said Brooks was not guilty of child abuse.
NEWS
July 5, 1992
The Black/Jewish Forum of Baltimore, also known as the BLEWS, received special praise in a major study released late last year by the Marjorie Kovler Institute for Black-Jewish Relations. The study said the BLEWS exemplified how black and Jewish Americans can overcome old antagonisms to promote understanding between the two groups.Several months ago, however, the 14-year-old organization hardly seemed the epitome of racial harmony. In February, the BLEWS board dismissed the black woman who had served as its executive director for only 3 1/2 months.
NEWS
By Stephen Vicchio | June 18, 1991
Here come real stars to fill the upper skies, and here on Earth C come emulating flies.-- Robert Frost THIS evening I am wondering about the consciousness of fireflies. My wife and 5-year-old son have gone off to bed, and I sit alone on the back porch to do the thinking. I can hear the bedsprings responding to their fitful sleep. In separate rooms, they turn this way and that, captured in a heat wave that envelopes the metropolis like an enormous plastic bag.I mop my brow and search for a flashlight to read the ancient thermometer tacked to the frame of the back door: 85 degrees at midnight.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
Will consumers pay $20 for a reusable glass drinking bottle? Walt Himelstein thinks so. The Owings Mills environmental chemist and entrepreneur invented the Pure reusable glass drinking bottle, which features a shock-absorbing plastic sleeve that holds the glass together if it breaks. Himelstein, 59, hopes to tap a surging interest among environmentally conscious consumers who want their own reusable bottles, rather than buying beverages in single-use glass, metal or plastic containers.
EXPLORE
February 22, 2012
The sewing lounge Sassy SEWer in Parkville has eight sewing machines for customers, but when Tamara Woods goes, she takes her own. It's not just about the machines, she said. "It's about the dedicated time with other sewers. We all like to do this. We chat. It's fun," she said. At home, she sews for other people. At Sassy, she works on raising her skill level and she sews things for herself, combining craftsmanship with fashion sense. "I love the technical part. But it's the creative part that takes over.
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