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Conscientious Objector

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NEWS
May 27, 2011
I enjoyed Richard Gorelick 's "Burger war heating up for summer," (May 25) but he failed to mention one crucial fact of burger consumption at restaurants these days: You can't get a rare burger. Well, a few purely local establishments will serve you one, but they are few and far between. Now, I don't expect McDonald's or Five Guys to produce a rare burger, but sit-down restaurants that cook burgers to order can do "rare" but they won't. I have been variously told that it is "illegal," "banned by the health department," or "against corporate policy or insurance company regulations.
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NEWS
May 27, 2011
I enjoyed Richard Gorelick 's "Burger war heating up for summer," (May 25) but he failed to mention one crucial fact of burger consumption at restaurants these days: You can't get a rare burger. Well, a few purely local establishments will serve you one, but they are few and far between. Now, I don't expect McDonald's or Five Guys to produce a rare burger, but sit-down restaurants that cook burgers to order can do "rare" but they won't. I have been variously told that it is "illegal," "banned by the health department," or "against corporate policy or insurance company regulations.
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NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | March 28, 1991
In a small, cramped apartment in a West Baltimore housing project, Abigal Wallace wonders what will happen to American patriotism now that the Persian Gulf war has stopped."
NEWS
By Paul Rockwell | February 1, 2007
It is a sad day in American jurisprudence when a soldier of conscience is court-martialed not for lying but for telling the truth, not for breaking a covenant with the military but for upholding the rule of law in wartime. The court-martial of Army 1st Lt. Ehren K. Watada is set for Monday at Fort Lewis near Seattle. The 28-year-old soldier from Hawaii is the first commissioned officer to refuse deployment to Iraq. He is charged with "missing movement" and "conduct unbecoming of an officer," including "use of contemptuous words for the president."
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2002
The Rev. John A. Mote's life of conscience, compassion and commitment would seem beyond reproach. But a single word -- "poor" -- scrawled on an "other than honorable" Army discharge nearly 56 years ago still echoes in his memory like a false alarm struck only this morning. "Character ... Poor." It's a description probably no one has ever used to describe Mote except the U.S. Army. Mote is 82 now, and the label still stings. He's a Methodist clergyman who only really retired a couple of years ago. He served mostly at impoverished inner-city churches in Baltimore and Washington.
NEWS
August 10, 1994
* Eric Warner Johnson, an influential Quaker teacher and the author of 57 books, died Thursday at age 76 from head injuries sustained in a fall. Mr. Johnson, a former teacher and administrator at Germantown Friends School in Philadelphia, wrote books aimed at helping young people and their parents deal with sex, family problems and growing up, including "How to Live Through Junior High School." A conscientious objector in World War II, Mr. Johnson helped to resettle refugees through the American Friends Service Committee in Portugal and North Africa, and later worked for famine relief in India.
NEWS
By Thom Loverro and Thom Loverro,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | February 23, 1991
FORT RITCHIE -- While President Bush pondered the events in the Persian Gulf at Camp David, the issue was also on the mind of U.S. Army Spc. 4 Leonard Jackson, stationed just a few miles away at Fort Ritchie in rural northern Washington County.The two men came to different conclusions.While President Bush decided that U.S. military action in the Middle East would be fair and just, Specialist Jackson, a military policeman and a Muslim, did not want to be associated with any part of the war, and he filed for discharge from the Army as a conscientious objector.
NEWS
February 16, 1995
William Bross Lloyd Jr., 86, a conscientious objector who founded the newsletter Toward Freedom, which follows the progress of new countries, died of pneumonia Saturday at his home in Rochester, Vt. He was the grandson of the 19th century social reformer Henry Demarest Lloyd and a lifelong Quaker. In the early 1950s he wrote a book, "Waging Peace: the Swiss Experience."Louis E. Schwartz, 92, a retired New York Law School professor and an authority on personal injury law, died Feb. 9 of cancer at his home in Brooklyn, N.Y. His first book, "Trial of Automobile Cases" (Matthew Bender)
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | October 30, 1990
The first debate between Rep. Roy P. Dyson, D-1st, and Republican Wayne T. Gilchrest escalated like a bloody Civil War battle until both sides were so badly wounded victory seemed irrelevant.For 30 minutes last night, Maryland Public Television viewers saw Dyson and Gilchrest interrupt, mock and attack each other on issues ranging from Social Security to Dyson's conscientious objector status in the Vietnam War.If the debate had gone on any longer, MPT might have had to caution parents against permitting children to watch.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | December 17, 1990
BERLIN -- German peace groups and American counselors are trying to help the increasing number of disgruntled GIs find 66TC way out of serving in the Gulf crisis.About 100,000 of the 250,000 troops based in Germany are expected to be sent to Saudi Arabia as part of the plan to beef up Operation Desert Shield, and there are signs that many of the troops do not want to go. At least 20 cases have been reported of soldiers who want to leave the forces rather than go and many more have said they would rather disobey orders than fight.
NEWS
February 5, 2004
A RELATIVELY small band of State House slots opponents rallied yesterday, standing up to the gambling juggernaut besieging Annapolis. Roughly two dozen state delegates and senators - joined by Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan and representatives from the League of Women Voters, the state NAACP and a dozen other church and civic groups - cast themselves as foot soldiers on the front lines of the war to stop Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s drive...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 29, 2002
MOSCOW - The lower house of parliament passed legislation yesterday that would offer some young Russian men an alternative to the draft, but only under conditions that liberals and advocates of military reform have called onerous and very possibly dangerous. In a vote that underscored the Russian military's resistance to easing conscription, which is required for all men between the ages of 18 and 27, the lower house voted narrowly to allow conscientious objectors and others who oppose military service on ethnic, moral or religious grounds to apply for alternative service.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2002
The Rev. John A. Mote's life of conscience, compassion and commitment would seem beyond reproach. But a single word -- "poor" -- scrawled on an "other than honorable" Army discharge nearly 56 years ago still echoes in his memory like a false alarm struck only this morning. "Character ... Poor." It's a description probably no one has ever used to describe Mote except the U.S. Army. Mote is 82 now, and the label still stings. He's a Methodist clergyman who only really retired a couple of years ago. He served mostly at impoverished inner-city churches in Baltimore and Washington.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 14, 2000
MOSCOW - Judge Sergei A. Pashin regularly infuriated his colleagues, acquitting defendants, speaking out against corruption, criticizing police brutality. Finally, he made a fatal mistake. He dared to reveal his office phone number on a radio program. That - and having the temerity to write a critical analysis of a court case in a nearby jurisdiction - persuaded his fellow judges to boot him off the bench in Moscow, where he has been a loud but lonely voice for legal reform. "They decided that giving out my phone number on the air was not behavior befitting a judge," Pashin, 37, said yesterday.
NEWS
February 16, 1995
William Bross Lloyd Jr., 86, a conscientious objector who founded the newsletter Toward Freedom, which follows the progress of new countries, died of pneumonia Saturday at his home in Rochester, Vt. He was the grandson of the 19th century social reformer Henry Demarest Lloyd and a lifelong Quaker. In the early 1950s he wrote a book, "Waging Peace: the Swiss Experience."Louis E. Schwartz, 92, a retired New York Law School professor and an authority on personal injury law, died Feb. 9 of cancer at his home in Brooklyn, N.Y. His first book, "Trial of Automobile Cases" (Matthew Bender)
NEWS
August 10, 1994
* Eric Warner Johnson, an influential Quaker teacher and the author of 57 books, died Thursday at age 76 from head injuries sustained in a fall. Mr. Johnson, a former teacher and administrator at Germantown Friends School in Philadelphia, wrote books aimed at helping young people and their parents deal with sex, family problems and growing up, including "How to Live Through Junior High School." A conscientious objector in World War II, Mr. Johnson helped to resettle refugees through the American Friends Service Committee in Portugal and North Africa, and later worked for famine relief in India.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 16, 1990
KENT ISLAND -- As Republicans see it, the fall matchup between Representative Roy Dyson, D-Md.-1st, and GOP nominee Wayne T. Gilchrest will be less about issues and more about personalities.Gathering here yesterday to launch their nominee's fall campaign, 1st District Republicans and GOP officials indicated they will stress the differences between the two men, highlighting Mr. Dyson's ethical troubles and Mr. Gilchrest's background as a combat veteran and teacher.Mr. Gilchrest, who won the GOP nomination last week with 29 percent of the vote over seven other candidates, offers "the ideal contrast" to the five-term incumbent, said William B. Lacy, a political consultant hired by the National Republican Congressional Committee to oversee the Gilchrest campaign.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson | January 17, 1991
In a small one-bedroom apartment in Rockville, a 35-year-old Kuwaiti refugee was eating dinner with his wife and two daughters when a friend called to tell him the news:"The liberation of Kuwait has begun."Immediately, the refugee's thoughts turned to the loved ones he left behind when he fled his war-ravaged homeland in October, and wondered if he made the right choice.It had seemed so clear. He had seen too many innocent people shot down in the streets and he wanted to save the lives of his two daughters, ages 4 and 3 -- even if it meant leaving his parents, his sister and his brother-in-law.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | March 8, 1993
BERLIN -- If Germany's major political parties ever agree that they want to send combat troops abroad, they will have another obstacle to pass: Many German young men claim conscientious objector status and get it -- even without the prospect of danger.All German men can be drafted for military service at age 19. But claiming conscientious objector status in Germany is easy; 95 percent of those who ask receive it.During the Persian Gulf war, when Germany first began talking about taking part in overseas missions, refusal rates among draftees shot up to nearly 30 percent.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | March 28, 1991
In a small, cramped apartment in a West Baltimore housing project, Abigal Wallace wonders what will happen to American patriotism now that the Persian Gulf war has stopped."
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