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Conscience

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NEWS
June 1, 1994
Rep. Dan Rostenkowski says, "I did not commit any crimes, my conscience is clear." And, "I strongly believe I am not guilty of these charges." If by those statements he means he did not do what a grand jury in Washington in a 17-count indictment said he did, then we hope he will be "vindicated," to use his word, by a trial jury. But if he means only, as some of his supporters have suggested, that he did what is charged but that this should not be considered felonious, then that's another matter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
In the opening episode of Season 4 of “Homeland,” Carrie Mathison (Claire Danes), CIA station chief in Kabul, is sitting in a rec center within the U.S. compound drinking a beer and watching baseball on TV, when a young Air Force pilot approaches. After an exchange that establishes Carrie as the person who called in the airstrike he flew on the home of a suspected terrorist, the lieutenant says, “Monsters.” “What did you say?” Mathison angrily demands of the young man she had previously been sizing up sexually.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 21, 2014
The political equivalent of schoolyard bullying seems back in vogue to a degree seldom seen since the days of the late Sen. Joe McCarthy of Wisconsin, who used bare-knuckle intimidation to cow a whole country into viral anti-communism in the 1950s. Despite New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie's assurance that "I am not a bully," more accounts of his strong-arm methods to get his way, strongly hinted in what's now known as Trafficgate, have cast him in that light. An even more pertinent comparison with McCarthy is being drawn by Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas.
NEWS
June 27, 2014
Reader Katrine Tierney writes that the Catholic bishops are preventing women from receiving from free contraceptives and that women have a right to follow their consciences ( "Catholic bishops overstep their authority," June 24). As I understand the bishops' objection to the health care mandate, it involves who pays for the contraceptives. They are not really free. Someone has to pay for them. Although insurance companies may pay for them upfront, they expect someone else to cover their costs.
NEWS
May 3, 2012
I don't always agree with Susan Reimer , but I must say that she seems to have her facts straight when it comes to the bad news coming out of the American bishops conference and the Vatican ("What would Jesus do? Not stuff like this," April 30). I've been complaining so much about the stand of the church on recent issues that I'm almost worn out. The petition drive targeting gay members of the community, as well as the really pathetic attack on American nuns, were the final straw.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | February 2, 1999
William Donald Schaefer is our Grand Provocateur. He's the man who comes to dinner and criticizes the food. He's your mother telling you to clean up your room. He's the burr under the saddle of City Hall, who calls Kurt L. Schmoke ``that nice young man'' in the most patronizing way, and thus provokes mayoral responses that couldn't be printed in a family newspaper.He's been state comptroller barely a week, and he's already got people choosing sides. He's our public conscience, some say. He's our perennial annoyance, say others.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | December 26, 1990
CONSIDERING his well-tuned social and ethical conscience (see 1993 Super Bowl and Dexter Manley), no doubt NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue will come down very hard on the 49ers for sitting Joe Montana out with some sort of contrived injury last week. With a playoff spot still up for grabs in the NFC, the contending Cowboys and Saints and everyone else deserved the best out of Frisco.* Let's get something straight about the Nevada-Las Vegas athletic program right now: It's not applying for admission to the Ivy League any time soon.
SPORTS
January 7, 2001
The Sun's John Eisenberg summed it up perfectly in his Jan. 2 column: Baltimore will never be the same without John F. Steadman. John was not only the heart and soul of Baltimore sports, he was the city's conscience. When I was privileged to work for John as a young reporter, he used to offer me money out of his own pocket so I could attend sports banquets. He also arranged a job for me in the press box at sold-out Colts games. He was the most caring and compassionate human being I've ever known.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA OZICK | August 13, 1993
How is conscience recognizable? Not simply through acts of grit -- the wicked, too, are dauntless -- but through timeliness and discrimination. Raising one's voice at exactly the moment when that is hardest to do; and knowing that one thing is not another thing.Author Cynthia Ozick wrote this for The Los Angeles Times.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 21, 2006
Sophie Scholl - The Final Days commemorates a rare episode in Nazi Germany when the still, small voice of conscience rang out loud and clear. It's an authentic, harrowing tale of heroism. Except for his perplexing, stylized use of massive, sparsely populated architecture, director Marc Rothemund tells Sophie's story unaffectedly and powerfully. He and his screenwriter, Fred Breinersdorfer, deftly reshape the interrogation and trial records of a White Rose resistance member: a 21-year-old woman arrested and executed for distributing anti-Hitler pamphlets on a Munich university campus.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 21, 2014
The political equivalent of schoolyard bullying seems back in vogue to a degree seldom seen since the days of the late Sen. Joe McCarthy of Wisconsin, who used bare-knuckle intimidation to cow a whole country into viral anti-communism in the 1950s. Despite New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie's assurance that "I am not a bully," more accounts of his strong-arm methods to get his way, strongly hinted in what's now known as Trafficgate, have cast him in that light. An even more pertinent comparison with McCarthy is being drawn by Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
One of the shortest and most meaningless suspensions in TV history ended Friday with A&E announcing that it was back in business with "Duck Dynasty" and its 67-year-old, bearded patriarch Phil Robertson. The announcement was a total cave-in by a cable channel in the face of a defiant Robertson and the members of his Louisiana clan. The cable channel had put Robertson on "hiatus" Dec. 18 after he was quoted in a GQ article comparing homosexuality to bestiality while making other ignorant and insulting comments about gay identity and sexuality.
NEWS
September 15, 2013
This is for four women who are not here. It is for grandchildren who never existed and retirement celebrations that were never held. It is for Sunday dinners that were never prepared in homes that were never purchased. It is for children who were never born and fathers who never got to walk daughters down the aisle. It is for mortarboards that were never flung into the air, for first kisses that were never stolen, for dreams that ended even as they still were being conceived. This is for four little girls who died, 50 years ago today.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 4, 2013
A few words on the death of Elwin Wilson. He passed last week in a South Carolina hospital at age 76. Wilson had endured heart and lung problems and had suffered a recent bout with the flu. There is little reason you would know his name, but as a young man, Wilson made a virtual career out of hatefulness. He was a Klan supporter who burned crosses, hanged a black doll in a noose, once flung a jack handle at an African-American boy. In 1961, he was among a group of men who attacked a busload of Freedom Riders at a station in Rock Hill, S.C. In none of those things was he unique, so no, his name should ring no bells.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 16, 2013
Many of us believe that capital punishment, first used in the Province of Maryland in 1638, should have been relegated to the trash heap long ago. Politicians in Annapolis had overwhelming evidence of its costly and debilitating flaws for many years, but too many refused to attach their names to repeal. Even in a state where they outnumbered Republicans 2-1, numerous Democrats feared being labeled soft on crime if they voted to end state executions. Indeed, the longtime president of the Senate, a Democrat, offered to personally inject poison into a convicted killer.
NEWS
By William E. Lori | June 26, 2012
With tweets and text messages, prayers and preaching, Catholics and other Americans are spending two weeks (June 21-July 4) launching a religious freedom awareness campaign called the "Fortnight for Freedom. " Concern for the freedom of Christians to practice their religion, both here and abroad, has been growing for years, and now there are calls for immediate action. Stories of people literally dying for the faith in Iraq and Nigeria can be found in daily newspapers. There, churches are bombed and the blood of martyrs runs freely.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | June 7, 1994
On December 3, 1969, a young man named Bill Clinton wrote a letter to the director of the Reserve Officers Training Corps at the University of Arkansas. In his letter, the 23-year-old law student explained that he opposed the war in Vietnam and therefore could not, in good conscience, participate in the R.O.T.C. program as he had agreed earlier -- even though reneging on that agreement meant he might be drafted.Wrote young Bill, "Because of my opposition to the draft and the war, I am in great sympathy with those who are not willing to fight, kill, and maybe die for their country (i.e.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 19, 2003
WASHINGTON - Forgive me, but I'm about to speak heresy. Blame the outgoing governor of Illinois, who recently emptied his state's death row. George Ryan commuted to life in prison the death sentences of 167 condemned criminals. The result: a firestorm of criticism, much of it from those who have lost loved ones to violent crime. Our instinct is to give great weight to what those people have to say. To listen with great reverence. But - and here's the heresy - it occurs to me that maybe we've already listened with too much reverence.
NEWS
May 3, 2012
I don't always agree with Susan Reimer , but I must say that she seems to have her facts straight when it comes to the bad news coming out of the American bishops conference and the Vatican ("What would Jesus do? Not stuff like this," April 30). I've been complaining so much about the stand of the church on recent issues that I'm almost worn out. The petition drive targeting gay members of the community, as well as the really pathetic attack on American nuns, were the final straw.
NEWS
August 29, 2011
Sunday marks the 48th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s historic "I have a dream" speech, delivered on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, and if not for Hurricane Irene, the day would have seen another mass gathering on the National Mall and another round of speeches, this time a gathering to honor his enduring legacy. Whenever the official dedication of the King memorial takes place - organizers think sometime this fall - the speeches by members of the King family, President Barack Obama and leaders from across the country will draw deserved national attention on the character and accomplishments of one of the great figures of 20th century America.
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