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By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | May 21, 1994
A federal judge last night forced striking maintenance workers at Conrail Inc. back on the job, ending a surprise work stoppage that had disrupted rail operations at the port of Baltimore and in 12 Northeastern and Midwestern states.The Philadelphia-based company said operations would resume last night and return to a full schedule by tomorrow. The strike, which began unexpectedly yesterday morning, did not disrupt passenger travel.The company obtained a temporary restraining order last night from U.S. District Judge Franklin S. VanAntwerpen in Easton, Pa., prohibiting the union's 3,500 members from striking, pending a Friday hearing.
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NEWS
March 18, 2009
CLAUDE BRINEGAR, 82 Transportation secretary under Nixon Claude Brinegar, who led an overhaul of the railroad industry and saw the nation through the oil crisis of 1973 as the third U.S. transportation secretary, died Friday of natural causes in Palo Alto, Calif. President Richard M. Nixon nominated Mr. Brinegar to head the Department of Transportation in late 1972. At the time, Mr. Brinegar was a senior vice president at Union Oil Co., where he had worked since 1953. During his tenure as secretary, Mr. Brinegar led efforts to overhaul the collapsed Northeastern railroad industry, ultimately resulting in the creation of Conrail Inc. He served as a founding director of Conrail from 1974 to 1975 and joined the board again from 1990 to 1998.
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BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 9, 1990
PHILADELPHIA -- For the first time in almost two decades, TC fierce battle between two large, financially healthy railroads is about to erupt in the Northeastern states.On one side is the defending champion, Philadelphia-based Conrail, the company that became the region's only major freight railroad when it was formed in 1976 out of the bankrupt shells of six other companies.After five years of heavy losses, Conrail has been a solid performer since 1981, in part because the 13,000-mile system has a near-monopoly on rail freight in the Philadelphia area and New Jersey, including the port of New York.
NEWS
September 8, 2005
Irvin Harold Jett, a retired Conrail conductor who had been a World War II prisoner of war, died at Perry Point Veterans Affairs Medical Center Saturday while recuperating from circulatory bypass surgery. The Perry Hall resident was 87. Mr. Jett was born in Baltimore and raised in Waverly, the son of a Pennsylvania Railroad worker. After graduating from City College in 1936, he went to work for the Pennsy as a brakeman and later was promoted to conductor. He enlisted in the Army in 1941 and served as a mortar gunner with the 175th Infantry of the 29th Division.
BUSINESS
By Journal of Commerce | August 3, 1994
Norfolk Southern Corp. and Conrail Inc. are negotiating a merger that would form a 26,400-mile railroad blanketing the Eastern half of the country.A merger would combine the predominantly north-south Norfolk Southern with the east-west Conrail, resulting in a network stretching from Chicago to Boston and from the Canadian border to the Gulf of Mexico.In recent years, the port of Baltimore has competed intensely with the Norfolk, Va., port, which is served by Norfolk Southern. Rail service in Baltimore is provided by Conrail and CSX. It was not clear yesterday what impact the merger would have on Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr. and John H. Gormley Jr.,Staff Writer | March 24, 1992
Amtrak, the nation's passenger rail system, and Conrail, the dominant freight railroad in the Northeast, face the threat of a strike that most likely would begin in June.Although a strike could come as early as April 4, with the expiration of a 30-day cooling-off period after mediation by a national panel, Amtrak management and union leaders expect a second mediation panel to be convened. That could delay any strike for at least two months."The day of reckoning is June 4," said Jed Dodd, general chairman of the Pennsylvania Federation of the Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employes.
NEWS
By A.R. "Pete" Carpenter | June 10, 1998
WE'VE left the Industrial Age behind for the Information Age. Still, as someone who has spent his whole career in the railroad business, I always shake my head when I hear that. Say what you will about e-mail, the Internet and the like, but as revolutionary as the Information Age is, we still haven't arrived at the point where we can e-mail an automobile, download a ton of coal or feed a roll of steel through fiber-optic filament. Even in the Information Age, to a very large extent the U.S. economy still runs on rails.
NEWS
October 7, 2004
William F. Ridenour, a retired Conrail yardmaster and golfer, died of pneumonia Sunday at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Gardenville resident was 78. Mr. Ridenour was born and raised in East Baltimore. He left City College to enlist in the Navy in 1943 and served during World War II as a landing craft radioman. After returning to Baltimore, he earned his General Educational Development diploma and attended the University of Baltimore. He began working in 1950 for the Pennsylvania Railroad as a yard clerk.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr. and John H. Gormley Jr.,Staff Writer | February 27, 1992
Members of Teamsters Local 557 are picketing a Conrail terminal in Baltimore because the railroad has awarded the work the union once did to a company the union says is employing non-union workers.The pickets are employees of PTL Transportation Services Inc., a Conshohocken, Pa., company that had a contract with Conrail to load and unload trains at the railroad's Bayview intermodal terminal in Baltimore.Last week, PTL employees at Bayview and 14 other Conrail terminals in the Northeast were ordered out on strike by the union to protest Conrail's decision to award the work to contractors employing non-Teamster workers.
NEWS
November 20, 2003
Milton T. Lassiter Sr., a retired Conrail clerk and former Baltimore resident, died of congestive heart failure Monday at Wilmington Hospital in Delaware. He was 82. Mr. Lassiter was born and raised in Wilson, N.C., and moved to New Castle, Del., in the early 1940s. He began his railroad career with the old Pennsylvania Railroad before enlisting in the Army in 1942. After serving in Europe as a truck driver with the Transportation Corps, he returned to New Castle in 1945. In 1961, he moved to Cockeysville while working for the Pennsy as a freight rate clerk and computer installer.
NEWS
October 7, 2004
William F. Ridenour, a retired Conrail yardmaster and golfer, died of pneumonia Sunday at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Gardenville resident was 78. Mr. Ridenour was born and raised in East Baltimore. He left City College to enlist in the Navy in 1943 and served during World War II as a landing craft radioman. After returning to Baltimore, he earned his General Educational Development diploma and attended the University of Baltimore. He began working in 1950 for the Pennsylvania Railroad as a yard clerk.
NEWS
November 20, 2003
Milton T. Lassiter Sr., a retired Conrail clerk and former Baltimore resident, died of congestive heart failure Monday at Wilmington Hospital in Delaware. He was 82. Mr. Lassiter was born and raised in Wilson, N.C., and moved to New Castle, Del., in the early 1940s. He began his railroad career with the old Pennsylvania Railroad before enlisting in the Army in 1942. After serving in Europe as a truck driver with the Transportation Corps, he returned to New Castle in 1945. In 1961, he moved to Cockeysville while working for the Pennsy as a freight rate clerk and computer installer.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2001
Expectations were high when Norfolk Southern and CSX Corp. agreed in 1997 to divide Conrail Inc. in what has been described as the most complex railroad merger in history. In an effort to win political support for the $10.3 billion deal, the railroads pledged to spend millions on long-awaited infrastructure improvements in Maryland, inject new competition into the transportation system, aggressively market the port of Baltimore and lower rates to entice shippers to take cargo off crowded highways and put it on rail cars.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2000
Baltimore native Michael J. Ward has been named president of CSX Transportation Inc., which operates the largest railroad in the Eastern United States - and the primary line serving the port of Baltimore. Ward, 50, has been with the CSX Corp. subsidiary for his entire career, serving most recently as executive vice president of operations. Ward assumed that post in April after a management shake-up that coincided with the departure of Ronald J. Conway, who formerly headed CSX's railroad subsidiary.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 1999
The companies about to divvy up the huge government-run Conrail system have certainly tried to do their homework.They bought extra locomotives, laid hundreds of miles of new track, tested computer systems and settled with a multitude of unions. They hired thousands of Conrail workers and managers and spent long hours teaching them what the future would hold.That future arrives today as Norfolk Southern and CSX, which already dominate commercial rail traffic in much of the East, take over chunks of Conrail.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1998
About 3,400 Conrail Inc. workers went on strike yesterday, disrupting Amtrak passenger service and shutting down freight operations on rail lines throughout the Northeast and the Midwest until a federal judge halted the walkout.The Brotherhood of Maintenance and Way Employees walked off the job about 6 a.m. to protest the use of outside contractors to build about two miles of track in Marysville, Ohio."We're halting trains from Boston to St. Louis," Perry Geller, the union's general chairman, said yesterday morning.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | December 3, 1991
A threatened strike against Amtrak's passenger service has been at least temporarily averted but negotiators for the railroad workers remain on a collision course with the Consolidated Rail Corp. freight system.Jedd Dodd, head of the Pennsylvania Federation of the Brotherhood of the Maintenance of Way Employees (BMWE), said the threat of a strike against Amtrak had dissolved because the national rail passenger corporation agreed to delay implementation of a new health insurance program until the issue can be addressed in mediation talks.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau of The Sun | October 18, 1990
NEW YORK -- Bucking widespread fears of a slowing economy, Conrail reported yesterday that it shipped more freight over the summer than during the same period last year.Overall traffic rose 5.1 percent in the quarter that ended Sept. 30, but, because of a less profitable product mix, revenues increased only 1.4 percent.That trend is continuing into the current quarter, said Gordon Kuhn, Conrail senior vice president, adding that in the first 15 days of the fourth-quarter, traffic continued to be slightly ahead of last year's.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1998
As the countdown to the acquisition of Conrail continues, officials of Norfolk Southern Corp. met with Baltimore-area business and shipping leaders yesterday to explain how the changes might affect commerce here.The split-up of Conrail Corp.'s 11,000 miles of track was approved last month by the federal Surface Transportation Board.The $10.2 billion deal between Norfolk Southern and CSX Corp. won't be made final until Aug. 22, allowing time for any lawsuits asking the board to revisit its decision.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1998
The division of Conrail routes between CSX and Norfolk Southern may help a small, Carroll County-based railroad that has had its nose pressed to the window, watching the giants split the spoils.Federal rail regulators have approved a plan to divide Conrail Corp.'s routes between CSX Corp. and Norfolk Southern Corp., ending 22 years of a federally created rail monopoly in the Northeast and leaving the East with two major railroads.The Surface Transportation Board's approval of the division of Conrail lines may indirectly help Paul D. Denton, president of Maryland Midland Railway Co., in his quest for access to lucrative rail interchanges in Baltimore and Hagerstown.
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