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Letter to The Aegis | May 27, 2014
Editor: Some of my fondest memories are from my time spent at the Conowingo Dam. As someone that has spent a lot of time at the recreation areas around Conowingo Dam and seen its operation firsthand, a recent Aegis editorial about sedimentation behind the dam got it wrong. The dam is one of the best recreational places in the entire state and is important to the bay's ecological health. The fisherman's wharf is a great spot to observe the many fish species of the Bay, including bass, shad, catfish and walleye.
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By Anirban Basu | October 13, 2014
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 27, 2014
Water rescue teams pulled two people out of the Susquehanna River near Conowingo Dam after reports of a missing kayaker early afternoon on Memorial Day. Rescue personnel and watercraft were staged along the river south of the dam near the Rock Run Road area in Susquehanna State Park, according to monitored Harford County emergency radio broadcasts shortly before 12:30 p.m. The two people were rescued at about 1:30 p.m. and taken to Lapidum Landing,...
NEWS
September 9, 2014
I'm left speechless after reading your recent editorial on the Conowingo Dam ( "Damning the dam," Sept. 1). It would seem to me that some Chesapeake Bay cleanup lobbyist wrote this article. Of course we have to continue our efforts to restore the bay. Of course overflowing sewers and stormwater run-off continue to damage the environment, and of course they must be stopped. But your writer is either ignorant of history or too young to remember tropical storm Agnes and how it virtually wiped out the grasses in the bay, causing damage we are still feeling more than 40 years later.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | November 9, 2011
The Maryland State Highway Administration has postponed the planned closure of Route 1 at Conowingo Dam until Monday, Nov. 14, the agency said Wednesday, citing weather concerns. The SHA had planned to close part of Route 1 at Conowingo Dam all day Thursday in order to resurface and repair highway damage at the intersection of Routes 1 and Route 222 (Rock Spring Road) caused by a fuel tanker truck accident and spill Oct. 26. The same work will now be done Monday because inclement weather was forecast for Thursday, SHA spokesman Charlie Gischlar said.
EXPLORE
June 28, 2011
Last week when Herbert Sachs, Maryland's representative on the Susquehanna River Basin Commission, said the problem of silt build-up behind Conowingo Dam had been discussed for years, but nothing had been done about it, he was spot on. The inaction over well in excess of a decade means the reality of a substantial ecological disaster is looming large. The kind of disaster risked by leaving the mess of sediment behind Conowingo Dam isn't the sort of thing that would cost human lives, but it is the kind of thing that is bound to change life along the Chesapeake Bay. It's also the kind of disaster we've experienced before.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | January 3, 2013
Divers and rescue personnel searched in the waters around Conowingo Dam Wednesday night for a 56-year-old Havre de Grace man who was reported missing and may have jumped from the dam, Maryland State Police said. As of Thursday afternoon, however, there was no confirmation that anyone had jumped from the dam, nor had anything been found. Around 7:20 p.m Wednesday, a dive team and other rescue personnel were dispatched to the dam for a report of a possible suicide A monitored Harford County emergency radio broadcast advised rescue personnel that an abandoned vehicle, with a suicide note inside, had been found near the dam. Rescue personnel called from both Harford and Cecil counties were instructed to meet in the "fisherman's wharf" area.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2012
On a hot summer day, it's hard to see how the Conowingo Dam could hurt the Chesapeake Bay. Anglers line the shore below the 94-foot high impoundment, casting out into the gently roiling Susquehanna River for rockfish breaking the water. Yet unseen, on the other side of the dam, millions upon millions of tons of sediment and nutrient pollution are slowly building up that could wreak havoc on the bay if they get through. "It's an invisible problem," said Michael Helfrich, the Lower Susquehanna Riverkeeper, as he watches the fishermen.
EXPLORE
October 10, 2012
Personnel from the Conowingo Hydroelectric Station will move crest gates Thursday from the upper parking lot at the Conowingo Visitor Center to the Conowingo Dam after the completion of regular maintenance and repairs. To move these large crest gates, it will be necessary to temporarily delay traffic on Route 1 in both directions from Route 222 to Shures Landing Road, just south of Conowingo on the Harford County side. The temporary delays are expected to occur any time between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 11. The delays on the highway will last from 15 to 20 minutes at a time.
NEWS
By J. Richard Gray | December 17, 2012
The Susquehanna River and its big dams have been in the news lately. A handful of Maryland county officials would like you to believe the dams are the primary ill of the Chesapeake Bay. They claim that because sediment reservoirs behind the Conowingo Dam are at capacity, instead of trapping pollutants during storms, the dam now allows two pollutants - phosphorus and sediment - to flow downstream at alarming rates. They argue that years of restoration progress have been erased and that current bay restoration efforts do not address these issues.
NEWS
September 1, 2014
The general election is still more than two months away but here's a bit of friendly advice to candidates hoping to win office in Maryland: Don't use the Conowingo Dam as an excuse to stop cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay. That would seem like common sense but it's become increasingly clear that damning the dam has become a popular political strategy. Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan released a 30-second ad through his website last month that essentially blames the Conowingo for the bay's woes and urges voters to fight back against other pollution-fighting strategies endorsed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Democratically-controlled state government.
NEWS
August 20, 2014
Gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan is using the Conowingo dam to attack his opponent ( "Rain inspires new Hogan attack on Brown," Aug 12) in a perfect example of politicians distorting facts to suit their campaigns. The 200 million tons of sediment stored behind the Conowingo Dam are certainly a threat to the Chesapeake Bay. However, to suggest that Maryland should abandon its local cleanup programs to deal solely with Conowingo is irresponsible and just plain wrong. On the day Mr. Hogan made his proclamation, record rainfall overflowed local rivers, creeks and streams in central Maryland, causing widespread flooding and polluted runoff.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | August 19, 2014
Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan doubled down on his efforts to seize the issue of the environment from Democratic rival Anthony G. Brown Tuesday, releasing a video in which he criticizes the O'Malley-Brown administration's efforts to protect the Chesapeake Bay. In the video, Hogan tells viewers that he would help the bay by "standing up for Maryland" and demanding that New York and Pennsylvania do more to clean up the Susquehanna River,...
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | August 12, 2014
Discussing the weather might once have been an alternative to arguing about politics, but not in Maryland in 2014. Before the front that brought torrential rains to Maryland Tuesday had even passed, it became the basis for an attack by Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan on Democratic rival Anthony G. Brown. Precipitation had already been at the center of this year's campaign as a result of Republican opposition to the storm water cleanup fees they have dubbed "the rain tax. " On Tuesday evening, after a day that brought flash flooding around the state and broke rainfall records at BWI, the Hogan campaign released a statement charging that the downpour underscored the O'Malley-Brown administration's failure to protect the Chesapeake Bay from " catastrophic releases of polluted sediment from the long-neglected control reservoirs, or ponds, above the Conowingo Dam. " Hogan was referring to a long-running controversy over how much hard the buildup of decades of sediment behind the dam on the Susquehanna River poses to the bay. Hogan considers it the No. 1 threat to the bay -- a view not shared by the Army Corps of Engineers and many environmentalists.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | May 27, 2014
Editor: Some of my fondest memories are from my time spent at the Conowingo Dam. As someone that has spent a lot of time at the recreation areas around Conowingo Dam and seen its operation firsthand, a recent Aegis editorial about sedimentation behind the dam got it wrong. The dam is one of the best recreational places in the entire state and is important to the bay's ecological health. The fisherman's wharf is a great spot to observe the many fish species of the Bay, including bass, shad, catfish and walleye.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 27, 2014
Water rescue teams pulled two people out of the Susquehanna River near Conowingo Dam after reports of a missing kayaker early afternoon on Memorial Day. Rescue personnel and watercraft were staged along the river south of the dam near the Rock Run Road area in Susquehanna State Park, according to monitored Harford County emergency radio broadcasts shortly before 12:30 p.m. The two people were rescued at about 1:30 p.m. and taken to Lapidum Landing,...
EXPLORE
BY KAYLA BAWROSKI | May 1, 2012
A Baltimore man remained in critical condition at Christiana Hospital in Delaware Tuesday morning after he was injured in a motorcycle accident Sunday afternoon at the Conowingo Dam. Maryland State Police have identified the injured motorcyclist as Franklin Melbourne Thomas, 45, of Baltimore, Lt. Charles Moore, commander of the Bel Air Barrack, said Tuesday. State police said Thomas was driving a 2006 Harley Davidson motorcycle south on Route 1 around 4 p.m. As he was getting off the dam and coming around the corner up the hill on the Harford County side, he went out of his lane, TFC Richard Decker, the investigating officer for Maryland State Police, said Sunday evening.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | February 27, 2013
The body of a Harford County man who had been missing since early last month was recovered Tuesday from the Susquehanna River below Conowingo Dam, Maryland State Police said. The man has been identified as Scott R. Hammer, 57, of Havre de Grace. His body has been transported to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Baltimore for an autopsy to determine the cause and manner of death, according to a news release from State Police. Shortly before 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, Maryland Natural Resources Police officers were contacted by workers at Conowingo Dam, who reported seeing a body lying on a rock in the river after the water level was lowered, State Police said.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Sediment buildup behind Conowingo Dam poses a relatively small threat to the Chesapeake Bay's health, a federal official said at a Senate hearing Monday. He predicted it could cost billions of dollars to address the risk by dredging the river bottom, and suggested it was not worth the expense. Col. J. Richard Jordan III, commander of the Baltimore District of the Army Corps of Engineers, testified at the hearing - held at the dam, rather than in Washington - that only 20 percent of the muck that turned the upper bay brown after Tropical Storm Lee in 2011 came from the buildup behind the hydroelectric facility, according to a joint federal-state study.
NEWS
rbenjes@theaegis.com | March 12, 2014
As taken from the pages of The Aegis dated Thursday, March 12, 1964: Residents were urged 50 years ago not to get alarmed if they noticed four foot squares painted in white on highways or in fields. The Harford County Metropolitan Commission hired Maps Inc. of Dundalk to take aerial photographs of the county from 3,000 feet. The square markers were placed at 130 different locations in the county by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. Once complete, the aerial maps could be put together and elevations could be better recorded.
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