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NEWS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SIDELINES | June 14, 1992
From top to bottom, the talent is not as deep as in the local American Legion 18-and-under baseball league.But the county's six Connie Mack teams can hold their own.And veteran Pasadena Saints coach Steve Herzberger said his young club and Harundale could compete on a regular basis in the county Legion circuit.At season's end, the top Connie Mack club will get a chance to prove it when it meets the local Legion champion in a best-of-three series for the right to represent the Anne Arundel Amateur Baseball Association American Legion/Connie Mack 18 and Under League in the Continental Amateur Baseball Association to be played here.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN REPORTER | December 15, 2006
Irvin Gladstone Hall, an infielder with the old Philadelphia Athletics during World War II who played in one of the American League's longest games - a 24-inning tie in 1945 with Detroit - died in his sleep Tuesday at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The longtime Hillendale resident was 88. Mr. Hall was born in Alberton, a small town on the Patapsco River that was renamed Daniels, and raised in Hampden. He was a 1936 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. "He didn't play baseball in high school, but played a lot of sandlot baseball around Baltimore and then tried out for the Eastern Shore League," said a son, Mark A. Hall of Catonsville.
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NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN, JR | October 26, 1992
GEORGE Howard Gillelan of Annapolis writes: "Harry S. Truman has been in the news recently. What does the middle initial stand for?"I know and you probably know. I wish you'd inform your readers about this trivium. Speaking of which, I don't think you've ever addressed the provenance of the name of Florida's Senator Connie Mack."I'm a sucker for writers who use six-bit words like "trivium" and "provenance," so here goes:1. The "S." in Truman's name literally stood for nothing. As David McCullough notes in his new biography "Truman," this was "a practice not unknown among the Scotch-Irish, even for first names.
NEWS
By Mark Silva and Mark Silva,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 8, 2005
WASHINGTON - President Bush, promising to simplify the way Americans pay federal taxes, appointed a panel yesterday to craft proposals by this summer that could become the groundwork for Bush's bid to overhaul the nation's complex tax code. "This is an essential task for our country. It's a task that will treat our taxpayers more fairly," Bush told his new nine-member bipartisan Advisory Panel on Federal Tax Reform seated with him in the Oval Office. "I am firm in my desire to get something done."
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,Sun Staff Writer | April 24, 1995
A surprise package awaited new Orioles manager Phil Regan when he walked into his office at Camden Yards yesterday. Inside, he found a Los Angeles Dodgers cap, plastic lining around the rim, that had been taken from him 29 years ago and a letter of explanation.Regan was playing for the Dodgers in 1966 when they clinched the National League pennant at Philadelphia's Connie Mack Stadium. Fans went onto the field, and as Regan clutched his jacket and glove against his chest, somebody grabbed his cap.Somebody turned out to be Jim McDowell, of Thorofare, N.J., and this is the text of his letter to Regan, dated Feb. 27:"Dear Phil,"A friend and I went to Connie Mack Stadium to see the Phillies play the Dodgers in a doubleheader on the last day of the season.
NEWS
By Mark Silva and Mark Silva,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 8, 2005
WASHINGTON - President Bush, promising to simplify the way Americans pay federal taxes, appointed a panel yesterday to craft proposals by this summer that could become the groundwork for Bush's bid to overhaul the nation's complex tax code. "This is an essential task for our country. It's a task that will treat our taxpayers more fairly," Bush told his new nine-member bipartisan Advisory Panel on Federal Tax Reform seated with him in the Oval Office. "I am firm in my desire to get something done."
NEWS
August 6, 1997
Frank Ellis Smith,79, a six-term congressman who lost his seat after being branded a liberal during the battle over segregation, died of heart failure Saturday in Jackson, Miss.Jerry Collins,89, a dog-track owner and former Florida state legislator who gave millions of dollars to colleges and universities, died Sunday in Sarasota, Fla.Narendra Kumar,55, India's top emissary to Guyana, died Sunday in Georgetown, Guyana, after suffering a heart attack.Ruth Adler,87, who chronicled the stories behind the articles on the pages of the New York Times during 33 years as editor of the paper's in-house journal, died Friday in New York.
NEWS
By Pat O'Malley | June 22, 1992
There's parity in the Anne Arundel Amateur Baseball Association (AAABA) 18-and-Under Connie Mack League. Unfortunately, it's a parity of discouragement.No matter which league coach you talk to, they all say the same thing.Ask who's on the team, who might be playing first base, second and so on, and the reply comes back with a name, followed by "when he shows up.""It's pretty discouraging that we can't get any commitment from these kids," says Broadneck coach Larry Krzyzaniak, who is coaching his third and final season in 18-and-under baseball.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN REPORTER | December 15, 2006
Irvin Gladstone Hall, an infielder with the old Philadelphia Athletics during World War II who played in one of the American League's longest games - a 24-inning tie in 1945 with Detroit - died in his sleep Tuesday at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The longtime Hillendale resident was 88. Mr. Hall was born in Alberton, a small town on the Patapsco River that was renamed Daniels, and raised in Hampden. He was a 1936 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. "He didn't play baseball in high school, but played a lot of sandlot baseball around Baltimore and then tried out for the Eastern Shore League," said a son, Mark A. Hall of Catonsville.
FEATURES
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 1997
A team of Washington Senators came to Camden Yards yesterday, but not to play ball against the Orioles. Those days are long gone.Instead, an entourage of U.S. senators -- all Republicans, for some reason -- and congressmen boarded a Baltimore-bound train at Union Station to schmooze, socialize, dress down and show support for a good cause, finding a cure for breast cancer. Not to mention the fun of hanging out with actress Lynda Carter, who still looks like Wonder Woman and threw the opening pitch at last night's game against the Minnesota Twins.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2002
Joseph T. Cascarella, a former pitcher with the Philadelphia Athletics and last surviving member of the 1934 U.S. All-Star team that toured Japan with a roster that included Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig and Jimmy Foxx, died of pneumonia Wednesday at Sinai Hospital. He was 94 and lived in Northwest Baltimore. In a major league career that lasted only five years during the 1930s, and ended because of an arm injury, Mr. Cascarella, a right-hander, earned a reputation for a remarkably sharp curve ball and an ability to change speeds and keep hitters off stride.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | August 2, 1998
From an inside, front-row seat. That's where Eddie Liberatore has been the last 55 years, back to when baseball was the game of America's preference and basketball and football were struggling for even a modest nod of acceptability.The Grand Old Scout. He paid attention to what was going on around him as he made contacts, looked for prospects and offered input on trades. "A scout," he said, "is like a newspaper reporter, only he doesn't publish what he sees and hears. Information is your lifeline."
NEWS
August 6, 1997
Frank Ellis Smith,79, a six-term congressman who lost his seat after being branded a liberal during the battle over segregation, died of heart failure Saturday in Jackson, Miss.Jerry Collins,89, a dog-track owner and former Florida state legislator who gave millions of dollars to colleges and universities, died Sunday in Sarasota, Fla.Narendra Kumar,55, India's top emissary to Guyana, died Sunday in Georgetown, Guyana, after suffering a heart attack.Ruth Adler,87, who chronicled the stories behind the articles on the pages of the New York Times during 33 years as editor of the paper's in-house journal, died Friday in New York.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | August 3, 1997
A prideful mother took pen in hand to write Connie Mack about her son's ability as a baseball player, and the surprising scenario that unfolded has evolved into the ultimate of success. The child was still an adolescent, a mere 16 years old, and even more incredibly, a 5-foot-9, 150-pound first baseman. Not the kind of profile that would normally command attention.That Mack, owner, general manager and manager of the Philadelphia Athletics, replied with encouraging words was noteworthy because that's not the usual way prospects are discovered.
FEATURES
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 1997
A team of Washington Senators came to Camden Yards yesterday, but not to play ball against the Orioles. Those days are long gone.Instead, an entourage of U.S. senators -- all Republicans, for some reason -- and congressmen boarded a Baltimore-bound train at Union Station to schmooze, socialize, dress down and show support for a good cause, finding a cure for breast cancer. Not to mention the fun of hanging out with actress Lynda Carter, who still looks like Wonder Woman and threw the opening pitch at last night's game against the Minnesota Twins.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,Sun Staff Writer | April 24, 1995
A surprise package awaited new Orioles manager Phil Regan when he walked into his office at Camden Yards yesterday. Inside, he found a Los Angeles Dodgers cap, plastic lining around the rim, that had been taken from him 29 years ago and a letter of explanation.Regan was playing for the Dodgers in 1966 when they clinched the National League pennant at Philadelphia's Connie Mack Stadium. Fans went onto the field, and as Regan clutched his jacket and glove against his chest, somebody grabbed his cap.Somebody turned out to be Jim McDowell, of Thorofare, N.J., and this is the text of his letter to Regan, dated Feb. 27:"Dear Phil,"A friend and I went to Connie Mack Stadium to see the Phillies play the Dodgers in a doubleheader on the last day of the season.
SPORTS
By Steve Kelley and Steve Kelley,Seattle Times | July 8, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- Some people travel to Graceland in the summer to worship Elvis. Some visit the Grand Canyon to worship nature.I go to The Vet to revisit my memories. I watch the Phillies and remember the days I worshiped them. Jim Bunning, Dick Allen, Greg Luzinski and Larry Bowa."Philadelphia is such a bad city," Bob Uecker, Milwaukee broadcaster and former Phillie, once said, "that when a plane lands, nobody gets off. Everybody gets on.Tuesday, I got off, rented a car and headed for The Vet to meet my hoagie-toting brother next to the statue of Connie Mack.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2002
Joseph T. Cascarella, a former pitcher with the Philadelphia Athletics and last surviving member of the 1934 U.S. All-Star team that toured Japan with a roster that included Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig and Jimmy Foxx, died of pneumonia Wednesday at Sinai Hospital. He was 94 and lived in Northwest Baltimore. In a major league career that lasted only five years during the 1930s, and ended because of an arm injury, Mr. Cascarella, a right-hander, earned a reputation for a remarkably sharp curve ball and an ability to change speeds and keep hitters off stride.
NEWS
By JOHN STEADMAN | February 5, 1995
More books have been written, movies made and words spoken to describe Babe Ruth than any sports figure in American history. But, after all that, perhaps the most eloquent and vivid picture of the man and athlete is painted by a former player, Joe Cascarella, who provides a narration that is both profound and intimate.Mr. Cascarella, who is now 87 and has lived in Baltimore for more than 50 years, pitched against Ruth and is the only surviving member of the 1934 major league all-star team that toured the Far East with him and such other magic names as Jimmie Foxx, Charley Gehringer, Lefty Gomez, Lou Gehrig and Connie Mack -- all Hall of Fame members-to-be.
NEWS
By Milton Bates | May 27, 1994
RAN into my old chum, the equine connoisseur Fats Drobnak, in Fells Point the other day.Where you headed, Fats?"On my way to the Yard to see them O's. Got a freebie from Stash. I grab a water taxi and ride over. Beats the hassle of parkin', and cheaper."Agreed. The season's almost two months old. Any opinion of the Birds' performance thus far?"Out of the gate pretty brisk, but front runners can fade in the stretch. Who knows better'n me?"Hmmm, trouble with the steeds again?"Oh contour. Been runnin' pretty good for me lately."
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