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Connie Imboden

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By Louise Sheldon and Louise Sheldon,Contributing Writer | November 29, 1992
PARIS -- Not far from where unruly mobs once stormed the Bastille, the photographs of a Baltimore artist are presenting to "the city of light" a new vision of photography.At the Galerie Suzel Berna in an old quarter newly revived with the arrival of Paris' second opera house, Baltimorean Connie Imboden is holding her first exhibition in France. Simultaneously, a two-man show including her photographs has opened in New York at the Witkin Gallery, and her book, "Out of Darkness," has come off the presses in Switzerland.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | November 4, 2001
Photography, perhaps more than any other medium, has been central to the postmodernist movement in art and to all the controversy it has inspired. In contrast to the early years of modernism, when painters like Picasso and Matisse were scandalizing audiences with their willful distortions of familiar forms, in recent years it has been photographers who have most resolutely pushed back the boundaries of the acceptable in art. In doing so, they have forced...
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | September 12, 1999
The dream was always the same. She was trapped below the surface of a vast, watery darkness, drowning. She could hear a steady pounding, like a drum or heartbeat, growing louder and nearer. She couldn't breathe, couldn't cry out, couldn't do anything except feel. And what she felt was fear.Eventually, the dream of drowning stopped. Little Connie Imboden grew up in Ruxton, went to art school and studied photography. Twenty years later, her work is admired and exhibited all over the world. Her first book of photographs, "Out of Darkness," was published in 1992.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | September 12, 1999
The dream was always the same. She was trapped below the surface of a vast, watery darkness, drowning. She could hear a steady pounding, like a drum or heartbeat, growing louder and nearer. She couldn't breathe, couldn't cry out, couldn't do anything except feel. And what she felt was fear.Eventually, the dream of drowning stopped. Little Connie Imboden grew up in Ruxton, went to art school and studied photography. Twenty years later, her work is admired and exhibited all over the world. Her first book of photographs, "Out of Darkness," was published in 1992.
FEATURES
September 8, 1991
BALTIMORE MUSEUM OF ART*"Cherished Christmas Garden Traditions," Nov. 29 to Jan.5MARYLAND INSTITUTE*"Faculty Exhibition," Oct. 4 to Nov. 3*"Four Contemporary Painters," Nov. 15 to Dec. 15*"Christy Rupp: Natural Selection," Nov. 15 to Dec. 15SCHOOL 33 ART CENTER*"David Driskell: Masterworks," Oct. 26 to Dec. 6*"Art and the Social," Dec. 21 to Jan. 31MARYLAND ART PLACE*"Lord Baltimore's Throne: The Evolution of the Chair in Baltimore" and "Take a Seat," Sept....
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | November 2, 1994
Baltimore's Connie Imboden, now showing at Gomez, has garnered acclaim on both sides of the Atlantic -- especially in Europe -- for her photographic investigations of the human being.One is tempted to say "of the nude" or "of the human body," but that would be misleading. Although Imboden does employ the nude, she has in the past made images that are surrealistic, symbolic and psychologically probing. Using water and sometimes mirrors with her subjects, she has reflected our dreams, fears and states of mind from serenity to anxiety.
FEATURES
By JOH DORSEY and JOH DORSEY,SUN ART CRITIC | May 9, 1996
Sometimes developing new ways to work can be a tremendous boost to creativity. And sometimes it can stifle creativity, if the artist thinks of the new way as an end in itself rather than as a means to an end.The latter is the case, it appears, with Nefeli Massia's recent paintings at Gomez.Massia's an accomplished artist whose last show at Gomez contained some strong landscapes revealing a Turneresque romanticism. In the recent paintings, she has jumped from the Earth into the cosmos. Swirling discs; conelike shapes suggesting up-rushing or down-rushing movement; the use of blue, white and gold to suggest sky or the great void of space; references to constellations; and titles such as "solitary cosmos" and "cosmopolis" all indicate that we're present at some cosmic event: the birth or eath of anything from a planet to a galaxy, perhaps.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | April 25, 1995
Jim and Suzie Hill are an admirable collecting duo -- they collect with modest means and for the love of art. He teaches English at Towson State, she's head librarian at Catonsville Community College, and since the 1960s they have been collecting in the field of contemporary art -- mainly prints, drawings and other works on paper.They buy but don't sell, and their small Baltimore house is crammed with art, filling up the walls and sitting on the floors. The collection includes well-known names such as Alexander Calder, Chuck Close, Grace Hartigan, Alex Katz, Bruce Nauman and Robert Mapplethorpe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | November 4, 2001
Photography, perhaps more than any other medium, has been central to the postmodernist movement in art and to all the controversy it has inspired. In contrast to the early years of modernism, when painters like Picasso and Matisse were scandalizing audiences with their willful distortions of familiar forms, in recent years it has been photographers who have most resolutely pushed back the boundaries of the acceptable in art. In doing so, they have forced...
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano | May 6, 1997
While Dave McKean exhibits in Gomez Gallery's photo space, the rest of the exhibit area is given over to figurative paintings by Kent Williams and black-and-white photographs by Baltimore photographer Connie Imboden.Though as distinctive as their respective media, these two artists both know how to disorient a viewer.Williams combines pure, painterly passages and photo-based painted images and produces mysterious paintings.In "Early Spring," two women in long black dresses are the center of attention.
FEATURES
By JOH DORSEY and JOH DORSEY,SUN ART CRITIC | May 9, 1996
Sometimes developing new ways to work can be a tremendous boost to creativity. And sometimes it can stifle creativity, if the artist thinks of the new way as an end in itself rather than as a means to an end.The latter is the case, it appears, with Nefeli Massia's recent paintings at Gomez.Massia's an accomplished artist whose last show at Gomez contained some strong landscapes revealing a Turneresque romanticism. In the recent paintings, she has jumped from the Earth into the cosmos. Swirling discs; conelike shapes suggesting up-rushing or down-rushing movement; the use of blue, white and gold to suggest sky or the great void of space; references to constellations; and titles such as "solitary cosmos" and "cosmopolis" all indicate that we're present at some cosmic event: the birth or eath of anything from a planet to a galaxy, perhaps.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | April 25, 1995
Jim and Suzie Hill are an admirable collecting duo -- they collect with modest means and for the love of art. He teaches English at Towson State, she's head librarian at Catonsville Community College, and since the 1960s they have been collecting in the field of contemporary art -- mainly prints, drawings and other works on paper.They buy but don't sell, and their small Baltimore house is crammed with art, filling up the walls and sitting on the floors. The collection includes well-known names such as Alexander Calder, Chuck Close, Grace Hartigan, Alex Katz, Bruce Nauman and Robert Mapplethorpe.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | November 2, 1994
Baltimore's Connie Imboden, now showing at Gomez, has garnered acclaim on both sides of the Atlantic -- especially in Europe -- for her photographic investigations of the human being.One is tempted to say "of the nude" or "of the human body," but that would be misleading. Although Imboden does employ the nude, she has in the past made images that are surrealistic, symbolic and psychologically probing. Using water and sometimes mirrors with her subjects, she has reflected our dreams, fears and states of mind from serenity to anxiety.
FEATURES
By Louise Sheldon and Louise Sheldon,Contributing Writer | November 29, 1992
PARIS -- Not far from where unruly mobs once stormed the Bastille, the photographs of a Baltimore artist are presenting to "the city of light" a new vision of photography.At the Galerie Suzel Berna in an old quarter newly revived with the arrival of Paris' second opera house, Baltimorean Connie Imboden is holding her first exhibition in France. Simultaneously, a two-man show including her photographs has opened in New York at the Witkin Gallery, and her book, "Out of Darkness," has come off the presses in Switzerland.
FEATURES
September 8, 1991
BALTIMORE MUSEUM OF ART*"Cherished Christmas Garden Traditions," Nov. 29 to Jan.5MARYLAND INSTITUTE*"Faculty Exhibition," Oct. 4 to Nov. 3*"Four Contemporary Painters," Nov. 15 to Dec. 15*"Christy Rupp: Natural Selection," Nov. 15 to Dec. 15SCHOOL 33 ART CENTER*"David Driskell: Masterworks," Oct. 26 to Dec. 6*"Art and the Social," Dec. 21 to Jan. 31MARYLAND ART PLACE*"Lord Baltimore's Throne: The Evolution of the Chair in Baltimore" and "Take a Seat," Sept....
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | May 16, 1996
After she visited the Johns Hopkins Children's Center three years ago, Baltimore art collector Jo Ann G. Hickey conceived the idea of a benefit show and sale of works by artists based on visits to the center. Subsequently, 20 artists associated with four local galleries paid visits and created works that grew out of their experiences.The benefit party, a private event, was held earlier this month, but the art will be on exhibit to the public at the Camden Yards warehouse on days of Oriole home games, beginning tomorrow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | June 3, 2001
The Contemporary Museum's "The Big Picture -- Take II" seemed quite the party at which to see and be seen. Many big names in the art world were there -- William Wegman, Connie Imboden, Andy Warhol, Grace Hartigan and Alexander Calder, to name a few -- names, that is, gracing some of the artwork being sold at the museum's second annual benefit auction and exhibition at its home at 100 West Centre St. And then there were the names of the 135 art aficionados present,...
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