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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 17, 1998
Baltimore-based Osiris Therapeutics Inc. said yesterday that it has struck an alliance with an Italian research group to develop treatments to help connective tissue cells regenerate quickly after chemotherapy, bone injuries and connective tissue disorders.Under the agreement, Osiris said it will supply $1 million in research funding to the Center for Advanced Biotechnology at the Institute for Cancer Research and the University of Genoa, Italy. Osiris said the alliance will seek to build on research by Dr. Ranieri Cancedda at the Center for Advanced Biotechnology.
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NEWS
By HARRY JACKSON JR. and HARRY JACKSON JR.,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 23, 2006
You work hard to get yourself as toned as one of those bodies on the label of a package of health food. Except behind you are these dimples that won't go away, no matter what you do. You have cellulite. Where did you get it? Blame yourself: You picked the wrong parents. Cellulite (pronounced sell-u-lite) runs in families. You were born female. The percentage of men who have visible cellulite is in the single digits. Cellulite, dimpling mainly on the back of the thighs, hips and behind, is fat. Those areas are a stubborn place for fat - relatively spongy, fibrous and less interactive with the blood supply - which means they are good for insulation and absorption of impact, but fat there doesn't go away as fast with exercise and diet.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 22, 1995
The most definitive study yet of the health effects of silicone breast implants has found no association between the implants and connective tissue diseases.The new study is so compelling and its results so consistent with previous studies, some leading rheumatologists contend, that the issue of whether implants cause those diseases can be considered closed. They maintain that it is time for the Food and Drug Administration to lift the voluntary moratorium on sales of the implants, which it requested in 1992.
SPORTS
By RANDY HARVEY AND CANDUS THOMSON | February 23, 2006
Questions and answers about today's women's figure skating long program: How long is the long program? For the women, it's between 3 minutes, 50 seconds and 4 minutes, 10 seconds. Besides the length, how is the long program different from the short program? The requirements aren't as rigid as in the short program, but there are some rules. There are maximums to the number of elements the skaters can perform. They can do a maximum of seven jumps (at least one must be an axel), four spins and two step sequences.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | October 25, 1994
An article in yesterday's Sun should have stated that manufacturers of silicone breast implants have agreed to pay $4.3 billion into a settlement fund to compensate women claiming injuries.The Sun regrets the error.Two new studies have found that women with silicone-gel breast implants are no more likely to develop connective tissue diseases than are women who do not have the implants.Researchers at the University of Maryland Medical Center found no link between the implants and one of the diseases -- scleroderma.
NEWS
By HARRY JACKSON JR. and HARRY JACKSON JR.,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 23, 2006
You work hard to get yourself as toned as one of those bodies on the label of a package of health food. Except behind you are these dimples that won't go away, no matter what you do. You have cellulite. Where did you get it? Blame yourself: You picked the wrong parents. Cellulite (pronounced sell-u-lite) runs in families. You were born female. The percentage of men who have visible cellulite is in the single digits. Cellulite, dimpling mainly on the back of the thighs, hips and behind, is fat. Those areas are a stubborn place for fat - relatively spongy, fibrous and less interactive with the blood supply - which means they are good for insulation and absorption of impact, but fat there doesn't go away as fast with exercise and diet.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | December 28, 1994
A man charged with killing two women in Severn last year asked an Anne Arundel Circuit judge yesterday to let his defense experts evaluate the scientific evidence against him.Darris Ware, 23, of no fixed address, could get the death penalty if he is convicted in the Dec. 30, 1993, deaths of Betina Gentry, 18, and her neighbor, Cynthia Vega-Allen, 22. The women were found shot to death in Ms. Gentry's Severn home.Mr. Ware, who was engaged to Ms. Gentry, is scheduled to be tried March 8.At yesterday's hearing, assistant public defenders Mark Blumberg and Robert Waldman asked Judge Lawrence Rushworth to allow four cartridges and four bullets from a .38-caliber pistol to be transported, under police escort, to a Belair laboratory where they would be examined by a defense firearms expert.
FEATURES
By Simeon Margolis, M.D. and Simeon Margolis, M.D.,Special to The Sun | June 7, 1994
Q: I have had lower back pain on and off many years. Last month, the pain spread into my left leg, and my doctor told me I have a slipped disk. The pain is almost gone after bed rest, but I would like to know what is meant by a slipped disk and whether surgery will be necessary.A: Between the bones of your spine are disks that act as shock absorbers. They are flat pads, about 1 3/4 -inch thick, with a ring of tough connective tissue (cartilage) covering a soft jellylike center called the nucleus pulposus.
NEWS
By Marie V. Forbes | December 5, 1990
If the thought of venison doesn't whet your appetite, you've never heard Charlie Magee describe the way he cooks venison roasts at his cabin in West Virginia."
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | July 26, 1991
Because of a production error, significant portions of this article were omitted in yesterday's final edition. It is reprinted her for clarity. Discovery of the Marfan syndrome gene, whose existence was predicted 35 years ago by Dr. Victor A. McKusick, a Johns Hopkins cardiologist, is reported in the current issue of Nature, a British journal.Scientists from Johns Hopkins and the Portland (Ore.) Shriners Hospital have proved that the gene responsible for making a connective tissue protein causes the syndrome, a potentially fatal, inherited disorder affecting one in 10,000 Americans, the journal reports.
NEWS
By William Hathaway and By William Hathaway,HARTFORD COURANT | January 2, 2005
Cheryl Argiros of Coventry, Conn., already has participated in four clinical trials of experimental treatments for scleroderma, a disease that turns skin to the consistency of mahogany. It has scarred her lungs and turned her hands into claws. Researchers say the pros-pects of developing new therapies to treat the connective-tissue disease have never been better. About a dozen new treatments -- including vaccines, stem cell transplants and specialized antibodies currently -- are being tested in patients.
NEWS
By Jane E. Allen and By Jane E. Allen,Special to the Sun | February 2, 2003
For more than a decade, silicone breast implants have been banned in the United States, pulled from the market amid claims that they made women ill. By the mid-1990s, the devices had become a symbol of what many regarded as corporate America's indifference to women's health, with one company, Dow Corning, eventually filing for bankruptcy protection. Now, silicone implants are poised for a comeback. With no fanfare, longtime implant maker Inamed Inc. has taken the first step toward returning the gel-filled devices to the marketplace.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | June 6, 1999
One of the challenges of my life is getting round steak to taste as good as the classier cuts, to taste as good as sirloin. It is tough. Round steak can be chewy.The books on beef explain round steak's chewy texture. It has more connective tissue as well as firmer muscle fibers than the more tender cuts. As someone whose muscle fibers tend to be getting softer, I usually find it hard to come up with much sympathy for any hunk of meat that is too firm. Yet I regularly find myself in the kitchen in the company of round steak.
FEATURES
By Russ Parsons and Russ Parsons,los angeles times | March 3, 1999
The rule for cooking stews is "low and slow." But some rules are made to be broken. Lately, I've been playing with stews cooked "high and slow," and the results have been fabulous. There's nothing like a couple of hours at 450 degrees to tenderize even the toughest piece of meat.That probably sounds shocking to experienced cooks. Indeed, when I first wrote about the technique, using a leg of lamb, I called several meat scientists to see what they thought. They thought I was crazy.But there is no arguing with the taste of that lamb.
BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 17, 1998
Baltimore-based Osiris Therapeutics Inc. said yesterday that it has struck an alliance with an Italian research group to develop treatments to help connective tissue cells regenerate quickly after chemotherapy, bone injuries and connective tissue disorders.Under the agreement, Osiris said it will supply $1 million in research funding to the Center for Advanced Biotechnology at the Institute for Cancer Research and the University of Genoa, Italy. Osiris said the alliance will seek to build on research by Dr. Ranieri Cancedda at the Center for Advanced Biotechnology.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 22, 1995
The most definitive study yet of the health effects of silicone breast implants has found no association between the implants and connective tissue diseases.The new study is so compelling and its results so consistent with previous studies, some leading rheumatologists contend, that the issue of whether implants cause those diseases can be considered closed. They maintain that it is time for the Food and Drug Administration to lift the voluntary moratorium on sales of the implants, which it requested in 1992.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | July 25, 1991
Discovery of the Marfan syndrome gene, whose existence was predicted 35 years ago by Dr. Victor A. McKusick, a Johns Hopkins cardiologist, is reported in today's issue of Nature, a British journal.Scientists from Johns Hopkins and the Portland (Ore.) Shriners Hospital have proved that the gene responsible for making a connective tissue protein causes the syndrome, a potentially fatal, inherited disorder affecting one in 10,000 Americans, the journal reports.The tall and long-armed Abraham Lincoln is believed to have had it. Olympic volleyball player Flo Hyman and University of Maryland basketball player Chris Patton died of it when their aortas -- the heart's major blood vessel -- burst despite apparently excellent health.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | June 6, 1999
One of the challenges of my life is getting round steak to taste as good as the classier cuts, to taste as good as sirloin. It is tough. Round steak can be chewy.The books on beef explain round steak's chewy texture. It has more connective tissue as well as firmer muscle fibers than the more tender cuts. As someone whose muscle fibers tend to be getting softer, I usually find it hard to come up with much sympathy for any hunk of meat that is too firm. Yet I regularly find myself in the kitchen in the company of round steak.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | December 28, 1994
A man charged with killing two women in Severn last year asked an Anne Arundel Circuit judge yesterday to let his defense experts evaluate the scientific evidence against him.Darris Ware, 23, of no fixed address, could get the death penalty if he is convicted in the Dec. 30, 1993, deaths of Betina Gentry, 18, and her neighbor, Cynthia Vega-Allen, 22. The women were found shot to death in Ms. Gentry's Severn home.Mr. Ware, who was engaged to Ms. Gentry, is scheduled to be tried March 8.At yesterday's hearing, assistant public defenders Mark Blumberg and Robert Waldman asked Judge Lawrence Rushworth to allow four cartridges and four bullets from a .38-caliber pistol to be transported, under police escort, to a Belair laboratory where they would be examined by a defense firearms expert.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | October 25, 1994
An article in yesterday's Sun should have stated that manufacturers of silicone breast implants have agreed to pay $4.3 billion into a settlement fund to compensate women claiming injuries.The Sun regrets the error.Two new studies have found that women with silicone-gel breast implants are no more likely to develop connective tissue diseases than are women who do not have the implants.Researchers at the University of Maryland Medical Center found no link between the implants and one of the diseases -- scleroderma.
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