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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 17, 2002
Although academia is not traditionally known for high salaries, 27 presidents of private colleges earned more than $500,000 last year, a survey by The Chronicle of Higher Education shows. The survey of 595 private colleges found that the median pay for the presidents of research universities increased 30 percent from the 1997 fiscal year to the 2001 fiscal year. In contrast, the pay for presidents of liberal arts colleges grew by 4 percent in that period. But the survey, to be published tomorrow, found that the president of a liberal arts college topped last year's chart.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Elizabeth T. Clark, who was deputy head of Baltimore City's Department of Legislative Reference for more than two decades, died Jan. 18 of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at St. Agnes Hospital. The 50-year Catonsville resident was 89. The daughter of Galen Taylor, a West Point graduate and career Army officer, and Gertrude Taylor, a homemaker, Elizabeth Ann Taylor was born in Watertown, Mass. Because of her father's work, she spent her youth in Philadelphia and Washington, where she graduated in 1942 from Woodrow Wilson High School.
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SPORTS
March 18, 1992
BaseballSeattle SuperSonics -- Named Tim Grgurich assistant coach.CollegesConnecticut College -- Named Robert Malekoff athletic director.New Hampshire -- Fired basketball coach Jim Boylan (15-69 in three seasons, 7-21 in 1991-92).Oregon -- Fired men's basketball coach Don Monson (116-145 in nine seasons, 6-21 in 1991-92).FootballNFL -- Fined the Buffalo Bills $5,000 because RB Thurman Thomas failed to show up at a media session before the Super Bowl.Miami Dolphins -- Signed FB James Saxon and TE Doug Wellsandt.
EXPLORE
March 27, 2013
CONNECTICUT COLLEGE: Margaret Robbins, of Fallston, a sophomore at Connecticut College took part in "People Watching," the Dance Club's spring performance, Feb. 28 and March 1 and 2 at the Martha Myers Dance Studio at Connecticut College. The concert featured works choreographed by students, along with student light designs. Students danced to music by Kanye West, Nicki Minaj, Simon and Garfunkel and other greats. Robbins served on the publicity board for the show and danced in "The Party and The Band" and "Flock.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Staff Writer | June 26, 1992
Doug Sanders remembers now how it started: When he was in junior high and enrolled in a sailing school in Annapolis, he used his rowboat to get there.Daniella DeFilippo remembers, too: Intent on trying out for the sailing team when she left for Connecticut College, she was diverted by the mention of rowing. Figuring "I could sail the rest of my life," she became a coxswain on the varsity crew.Helmut Berthold rowed for three years in high school in his native West Germany. Art Cooke, born in New Jersey but raised and schooled in England, learned to row while studying there for his doctorate.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | May 28, 2007
Let's imagine that in the midst of the gluttony at your holiday cookout this weekend - oh, I'm not saying you're a glutton, it's the others you're with - a hot dog rolls off the grill and lands on the deck or patio. For an instant everyone freezes, seemingly paralyzed with indecision. But not you. No, you're a man of action. Or a woman of action. (Don't take that the wrong way.) Anyway, invoking the legendary Five-Second Rule, which states that food that falls on the floor is safe to eat as long as it's picked up within five seconds, you snatch up the hot dog and wolf it down.
EXPLORE
March 27, 2013
CONNECTICUT COLLEGE: Margaret Robbins, of Fallston, a sophomore at Connecticut College took part in "People Watching," the Dance Club's spring performance, Feb. 28 and March 1 and 2 at the Martha Myers Dance Studio at Connecticut College. The concert featured works choreographed by students, along with student light designs. Students danced to music by Kanye West, Nicki Minaj, Simon and Garfunkel and other greats. Robbins served on the publicity board for the show and danced in "The Party and The Band" and "Flock.
NEWS
September 3, 1999
George Sugarman, 87, a sculptor whose colorful geometric aluminum designs were seen in museums around the world, died Aug. 25 in New York. He made his work friendly, incorporating benches and canopies into the architecturally scaled works.In 1975, one such piece, commissioned by the General Services Administration for the Garmatz Federal Courthouse in Baltimore, was opposed by several judges with offices in the building, first on aesthetic grounds. Later, they said it could be dangerous for children.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Elizabeth T. Clark, who was deputy head of Baltimore City's Department of Legislative Reference for more than two decades, died Jan. 18 of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at St. Agnes Hospital. The 50-year Catonsville resident was 89. The daughter of Galen Taylor, a West Point graduate and career Army officer, and Gertrude Taylor, a homemaker, Elizabeth Ann Taylor was born in Watertown, Mass. Because of her father's work, she spent her youth in Philadelphia and Washington, where she graduated in 1942 from Woodrow Wilson High School.
NEWS
June 22, 2005
SARAH ELIZABETH BAUERNSCHMIDT MURRAY, 82, of 24 Robin Hood Dr., Gales Ferry, Connecticut, died June 17, 2005 at the Lawrence and Memorial Hospital. She was born March 23, 1923 in Baltimore Maryland, the daughter of the late Rear Admiral G.W. Bauernschmidt and the late Maude (Pearce) Bauernschmidt. Sarah's family is deeply rooted in Maryland history. Her great grandfather, George Bauernschmidt, started the Bauernschmidt Brewery in the 19th century. Her paternal grandmother, Marie Bauernschmidt, was one of the most powerful and influential political figures in Baltimore history.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | May 28, 2007
Let's imagine that in the midst of the gluttony at your holiday cookout this weekend - oh, I'm not saying you're a glutton, it's the others you're with - a hot dog rolls off the grill and lands on the deck or patio. For an instant everyone freezes, seemingly paralyzed with indecision. But not you. No, you're a man of action. Or a woman of action. (Don't take that the wrong way.) Anyway, invoking the legendary Five-Second Rule, which states that food that falls on the floor is safe to eat as long as it's picked up within five seconds, you snatch up the hot dog and wolf it down.
NEWS
June 22, 2005
SARAH ELIZABETH BAUERNSCHMIDT MURRAY, 82, of 24 Robin Hood Dr., Gales Ferry, Connecticut, died June 17, 2005 at the Lawrence and Memorial Hospital. She was born March 23, 1923 in Baltimore Maryland, the daughter of the late Rear Admiral G.W. Bauernschmidt and the late Maude (Pearce) Bauernschmidt. Sarah's family is deeply rooted in Maryland history. Her great grandfather, George Bauernschmidt, started the Bauernschmidt Brewery in the 19th century. Her paternal grandmother, Marie Bauernschmidt, was one of the most powerful and influential political figures in Baltimore history.
NEWS
April 26, 2004
Frances Rafferty, 81, a pouty glamour girl in B movies of the 1940s and television shows of the 1950s who is best remembered as Spring Byingtons daughter in the long-running sitcom December Bride, died April 18 in Paso Robles, Calif. The actress largely retired from the large and small screens in 1961 after the brief run of a December Bride spinoff, Pete and Gladys, starring Harry Morgan. She continued to play occasional roles on such series as The Streets of San Francisco into the 1970s, but devoted much of her later years to raising quarter horses.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 17, 2002
Although academia is not traditionally known for high salaries, 27 presidents of private colleges earned more than $500,000 last year, a survey by The Chronicle of Higher Education shows. The survey of 595 private colleges found that the median pay for the presidents of research universities increased 30 percent from the 1997 fiscal year to the 2001 fiscal year. In contrast, the pay for presidents of liberal arts colleges grew by 4 percent in that period. But the survey, to be published tomorrow, found that the president of a liberal arts college topped last year's chart.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2002
Minutes after losing to Notre Dame last week, Navy linebacker Eddie Carthan stood in front of the media and spoke from the heart. "This hurts because we had a chance to make history," Carthan said of Navy's 30-23 loss. "Everyone would have looked at us differently. Right now, people are saying, `Navy might be good.' But after a week they'll have forgotten about this game." A week has passed, and it turns out Carthan was right. Many have forgotten Navy's heroic effort against the highly favored Irish.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2001
You might gain 10 pounds just thinking about the feast Deborah Edwards arranged at her Woodlawn home for the Central Connecticut men's basketball team yesterday. Fried chicken, macaroni and cheese, chicken baked with provolone cheese and mushrooms, turkey, lemon pepper pork, pit beef, three types of cakes, and oh, yes, collard greens. "Corsley would have a fit if we didn't have any greens," Edwards said, referring to her son, Corsley Edwards Jr., a former standout at Lake Clifton and Mount St. Joseph.
NEWS
April 26, 2004
Frances Rafferty, 81, a pouty glamour girl in B movies of the 1940s and television shows of the 1950s who is best remembered as Spring Byingtons daughter in the long-running sitcom December Bride, died April 18 in Paso Robles, Calif. The actress largely retired from the large and small screens in 1961 after the brief run of a December Bride spinoff, Pete and Gladys, starring Harry Morgan. She continued to play occasional roles on such series as The Streets of San Francisco into the 1970s, but devoted much of her later years to raising quarter horses.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2002
Minutes after losing to Notre Dame last week, Navy linebacker Eddie Carthan stood in front of the media and spoke from the heart. "This hurts because we had a chance to make history," Carthan said of Navy's 30-23 loss. "Everyone would have looked at us differently. Right now, people are saying, `Navy might be good.' But after a week they'll have forgotten about this game." A week has passed, and it turns out Carthan was right. Many have forgotten Navy's heroic effort against the highly favored Irish.
NEWS
September 3, 1999
George Sugarman, 87, a sculptor whose colorful geometric aluminum designs were seen in museums around the world, died Aug. 25 in New York. He made his work friendly, incorporating benches and canopies into the architecturally scaled works.In 1975, one such piece, commissioned by the General Services Administration for the Garmatz Federal Courthouse in Baltimore, was opposed by several judges with offices in the building, first on aesthetic grounds. Later, they said it could be dangerous for children.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Staff Writer | June 26, 1992
Doug Sanders remembers now how it started: When he was in junior high and enrolled in a sailing school in Annapolis, he used his rowboat to get there.Daniella DeFilippo remembers, too: Intent on trying out for the sailing team when she left for Connecticut College, she was diverted by the mention of rowing. Figuring "I could sail the rest of my life," she became a coxswain on the varsity crew.Helmut Berthold rowed for three years in high school in his native West Germany. Art Cooke, born in New Jersey but raised and schooled in England, learned to row while studying there for his doctorate.
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