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By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2003
For 29 years, Ladan and Laleh Bijani have lived fused together at the head - forced, by a fluke of nature, to compromise on when to get up in the morning, when to go to bed at night and what to do every moment in between. Next month, the sisters from Iran hope to begin independent lives as the first set of twins conjoined at the head to be separated as adults. Dr. Benjamin Carson, director of pediatric neurosurgery at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center, will help lead an international team of doctors performing the high-risk surgery at Raffles Hospital in Singapore during the first week of July.
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By Diane W. Stoneback, Tribune Newspapers | March 28, 2013
Mutter Museum may leave you shocked and horrified or amazed and fascinated. Either way, its collections of bones, bodies, body parts, plus tumors and other terrors, are unforgettable. The nation's finest and oldest medical museum - celebrating its 150th anniversary this month - bills itself as "disturbingly informative," and that is absolutely true. Specimens lining its wood-and-glass display cases reveal the effects of epidemics and diseases on the body, as well as an amazing array of human curiosities and anomalies.
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NEWS
By VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH and VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 30, 2006
Half-Life Shelley Jackson HarperCollins / 464 pp / $24.95 Shelley Jackson never does the same thing twice. Half-Life is her first literary novel (she previously published Skin, a novel in tattoos, and Patchwork Girl, a hypertext novel). Thus it could be said that if Jackson has an oeuvre, that oeuvre is surprise. Jackson strives for the singular, so although Half-Life might be accurately described as a novel of identity - hardly surprising literary territory - through Jackson's legerdemain, identity becomes something wholly other, both literally and literarily.
NEWS
By VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH and VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 30, 2006
Half-Life Shelley Jackson HarperCollins / 464 pp / $24.95 Shelley Jackson never does the same thing twice. Half-Life is her first literary novel (she previously published Skin, a novel in tattoos, and Patchwork Girl, a hypertext novel). Thus it could be said that if Jackson has an oeuvre, that oeuvre is surprise. Jackson strives for the singular, so although Half-Life might be accurately described as a novel of identity - hardly surprising literary territory - through Jackson's legerdemain, identity becomes something wholly other, both literally and literarily.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2002
Ciera and Tiera Bennett entered what was like a time machine yesterday when they stepped into a University of Maryland Medical Center room to meet another pair of twins who were joined by the chest at birth and separated by surgeons. The two 16-year-old high school sophomores from East Baltimore said gazing upon 7-month-old Christine and Loice Onziga was like seeing themselves when they were babies. The Onziga twins, from Leiko, Uganda, were separated April 19 using surgical techniques similar to those used on the Bennetts.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 3, 1999
As melodramas go, "Twin Falls Idaho" is pretty conventional, right down to its hooker with a heart of gold, its obstacle-strewn paths to love and a character suffering from an incurable disease.But "Twin Falls Idaho" has a hook. Its two main characters are conjoined twins, one of whom falls in love with the aforementioned working girl. As a metaphor for intimacy, commitment and the threat of fusion that deep love entails, the trope is an apt one. But "Twin Falls Idaho" still commits the same kind of maudlin sensationalism that it condemns.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2002
Three days short of their first birthday, they have tiny baby teeth, a vocabulary that includes "mama" and "bye-bye" - and the milestone of their first unassisted steps not far in the future. Christine and Loice Onziga, the conjoined twins separated in April during a 12-hour operation at the University of Maryland Medical Center, are developing into normal, healthy children and are preparing to return to their native Africa next week. "I feel so excited to go back home with the two healthy girls and to meet with the rest of the family," Gordon Onziga, 29, said yesterday at an early birthday celebration at the hospital, attended by more than two dozen medical professionals who have worked with his daughters.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2003
SINGAPORE - A marathon operation to fulfill Ladan and Laleh Bijani's wish for independent lives failed yesterday as doctors managed to separate the conjoined twins, only to see them die. The 29-year-old Iranian sisters died on separate operating tables at Raffles Hospital after more than 50 hours of surgery that had been marked by some successes, surprises and setbacks. The twins had been in stable condition before surgeons made the final cuts to detach their brains, doctors said. But, just as they achieved their long-sought separation, the sisters began losing massive amounts of blood.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 6, 2003
Dr. Benjamin Carson is a world-famous Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon, author and motivational speaker of considerable renown. This month, he adds Hollywood actor to that resume, but in what is surely a surprising role: playing himself, essentially, in the latest movie by the Farrelly Brothers, those purveyors of such outlandish comic mayhem as Dumb and Dumber and There's Something About Mary. Come Friday, when Stuck on You opens in Baltimore, audiences will see Carson playing a doctor to conjoined twins (Matt Damon and Greg Kinnear)
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2003
SINGAPORE - Lying in coffins draped in black and gold with a few white flowers on top, the Bijani sisters were arranged side by side the way they went through life: Ladan on the right and her sister Laleh on the left. Except now, the formerly conjoined twins were separate. Hundreds of people gathered at the Ba'alwie mosque last night to offer prayers and blessings for the 29-year-old Iranian sisters, who died Tuesday more than 50 hours into an unprecedented operation to separate them.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2004
The surgical separation of conjoined twins resumed at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center yesterday, with doctors working late into the night to disconnect a critical tangle of blood vessels and "tease apart" brain tissue. In an update at 11 p.m., a hospital spokeswoman said surgeons were still working to separate the delicate brain tissue of 13-month-olds Lea and Tabea Block of Germany. The surgery, which started at 6 a.m., was expected to last several more hours. The twins were "doing well."
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2004
It is one of the rare operations where two lives are in the balance. Surgery to separate conjoined twins - which occur once in every 200,000 live births - brings with it countless complexities and potential complications. And at every turn, surgeons say, they must evaluate and then re-evaluate whether it's medically practical to continue. "You don't make a commitment to do one thing and then finish," said Dr. James T. Goodrich, director of pediatric neurosurgery at the Children's Hospital at Montefiore Medical Center in New York, who co-led a team that successfully separated twin Filipino boys last month.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2003
Call them 2003's lifestyle newsmakers. Not President Bush, but Dr. Atkins. Not Wall Street, but wet basements. Not aquaporins, but picture phones. These are the people, places and things that -- for better or worse -- caught our attention this past year. They were emblematic of the widely differing subjects that fall under the catch-all "lifestyle": fashion, interior design, relationships, health, fitness, food and nutrition. We don't pretend this is the year-ending list to end all year-enders.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 12, 2003
Sun Score 2 1/2 - stars Stuck On You is proof that sweet and funny don't always make for the best mix. But who would have thought it would have been the Farrelly Brothers who brought that point home? As purveyors of cinematic outrageousness, the Farrellys have known few equals. There's Something About Mary, Dumb and Dumber, Shallow Hal: Each has plumbed comedic depths lesser filmmakers have dared not enter. And while the Farrellys have not been nearly as crass as some critics have suggested - it was the heart behind Mary and Hal that made them resonate, not the dumb jokes - no one would ever mistake their sentimentality for a Hallmark card.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 6, 2003
Dr. Benjamin Carson is a world-famous Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon, author and motivational speaker of considerable renown. This month, he adds Hollywood actor to that resume, but in what is surely a surprising role: playing himself, essentially, in the latest movie by the Farrelly Brothers, those purveyors of such outlandish comic mayhem as Dumb and Dumber and There's Something About Mary. Come Friday, when Stuck on You opens in Baltimore, audiences will see Carson playing a doctor to conjoined twins (Matt Damon and Greg Kinnear)
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2003
SINGAPORE - Lying in coffins draped in black and gold with a few white flowers on top, the Bijani sisters were arranged side by side the way they went through life: Ladan on the right and her sister Laleh on the left. Except now, the formerly conjoined twins were separate. Hundreds of people gathered at the Ba'alwie mosque last night to offer prayers and blessings for the 29-year-old Iranian sisters, who died Tuesday more than 50 hours into an unprecedented operation to separate them.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2004
It is one of the rare operations where two lives are in the balance. Surgery to separate conjoined twins - which occur once in every 200,000 live births - brings with it countless complexities and potential complications. And at every turn, surgeons say, they must evaluate and then re-evaluate whether it's medically practical to continue. "You don't make a commitment to do one thing and then finish," said Dr. James T. Goodrich, director of pediatric neurosurgery at the Children's Hospital at Montefiore Medical Center in New York, who co-led a team that successfully separated twin Filipino boys last month.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2003
Call them 2003's lifestyle newsmakers. Not President Bush, but Dr. Atkins. Not Wall Street, but wet basements. Not aquaporins, but picture phones. These are the people, places and things that -- for better or worse -- caught our attention this past year. They were emblematic of the widely differing subjects that fall under the catch-all "lifestyle": fashion, interior design, relationships, health, fitness, food and nutrition. We don't pretend this is the year-ending list to end all year-enders.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2003
SINGAPORE - A marathon operation to fulfill Ladan and Laleh Bijani's wish for independent lives failed yesterday as doctors managed to separate the conjoined twins, only to see them die. The 29-year-old Iranian sisters died on separate operating tables at Raffles Hospital after more than 50 hours of surgery that had been marked by some successes, surprises and setbacks. The twins had been in stable condition before surgeons made the final cuts to detach their brains, doctors said. But, just as they achieved their long-sought separation, the sisters began losing massive amounts of blood.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Erika Niedowski and Jonathan Bor and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2003
Many hours into surgery to separate the conjoined Iranian twins, doctors suddenly faced a wrenching question: With a drainage vessel dangerously congested, should they stop the operation and leave the twins fused at the head? That option carried its own risks, but continuing would subject Laleh and Ladan Bijani to hours more of perilous surgery. After consulting with the twins' designated next of kin in Singapore, doctors got their answer. "We were told that Ladan and Laleh's wishes were to be separated under all circumstances," said Dr. Loo Choon Yong, chairman of Raffles Hospital.
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