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By Amalie Adler Ascher | November 10, 1990
Rare is the yard that doesn't contain at least one "Christmas tree," as people who don't know one conifer from another are apt to lump members of this major group of landscape plants.And yet, once you recognize the differences you'll quickly be able to tell one from another and choose the types best suited to particular situations.Conifers are a mainstay of the garden, their tall, stately presence infusing it with structure and even a sense of power. In winter, when deciduous trees are bare and the landscape stands bleak and cold, the blues and greens of conifers spice it with color and a warm glow of freshness.
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By Peter C. Agre and Peter C. Agre,Special to the Sun | June 26, 2005
As a Boy Scout in my native Minnesota, Augusts were spent paddling in the wilderness canoe area at the U.S.-Canada border west of Lake Superior -- a vast, watery expanse that fueled my imagination. As an adult, I have continued this canoeing tradition with my family, and we have taken trips farther into Canada. But my lifelong fantasy -- formed long before I ever thought to become a scientist or dreamed of joining the faculty of Johns Hopkins -- had always been the trek to Hudson Bay, that subarctic region more familiar to polar bears than to most humans.
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By Ann Egerton and Ann Egerton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 9, 1997
One of the nice things about conifers is that they don't dump leaves all over your yard in the fall. With the exception of larches, the bald cypress and dawn redwood, conifers -- whose name means cone-bearing -- are evergreen.Their branches discreetly lose their leaves -- called needles or scales, depending on the type -- throughout the year but are never bare. After the deciduous trees shed their leaves in the fall, the conifers stand out in full dress.Conifers are often the backbone of gardens as well as forests throughout the world.
NEWS
By Marty Ross and Marty Ross,Universal Press Syndicate | March 13, 2005
Many gardens are protected by mighty shade trees that rise above the housetops. Trees that are naturally of a smaller stature, such as dogwoods, flowering cherries, crab apples and redbuds, bring the trees in your life back down to your level. These small trees are of a great beauty, if only because they are so approachable. "Small trees are lasting, important structural elements of a landscape. They give you immediate impact, and they're very exciting." says Todd Forrest, a woody-plant expert at the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx.
NEWS
By Doug Birch and Doug Birch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 1996
At about this time every year, many Americans bring a small evergreen tree into their home to help celebrate the holidays, perhaps as a symbol of life's refusal to surrender during the long bleak winter.But why are evergreens in fact always green?The answer is a matter of how evergreens and broad-leaf trees over the millennia have adopted different survival strategies, particularly in how they handle the vital question of water.In temperate climates, most evergreens are conifers, or cone-bearing trees.
NEWS
By YVONNE BASKIN | December 20, 1992
Encinitas, California.--In a greenhouse in Madison, Wisconsin, a row of ordinary-looking six-inch spruce trees may represent the ghosts of Christmas future. These tiny trees are clones of superior white spruces, fortified with a bacterial gene for pest resistance and rooted in soil after long incubation in a lab dish.They represent only the second success scientists have had in regrowing conifers (cone-bearing trees) from genetically engineered embryos. The first came last year at Michigan Technological University with a European larch, and similar manipulations of fir and pine are close behind.
NEWS
By Marty Ross and Marty Ross,Universal Press Syndicate | March 13, 2005
Many gardens are protected by mighty shade trees that rise above the housetops. Trees that are naturally of a smaller stature, such as dogwoods, flowering cherries, crab apples and redbuds, bring the trees in your life back down to your level. These small trees are of a great beauty, if only because they are so approachable. "Small trees are lasting, important structural elements of a landscape. They give you immediate impact, and they're very exciting." says Todd Forrest, a woody-plant expert at the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx.
TRAVEL
By Peter C. Agre and Peter C. Agre,Special to the Sun | June 26, 2005
As a Boy Scout in my native Minnesota, Augusts were spent paddling in the wilderness canoe area at the U.S.-Canada border west of Lake Superior -- a vast, watery expanse that fueled my imagination. As an adult, I have continued this canoeing tradition with my family, and we have taken trips farther into Canada. But my lifelong fantasy -- formed long before I ever thought to become a scientist or dreamed of joining the faculty of Johns Hopkins -- had always been the trek to Hudson Bay, that subarctic region more familiar to polar bears than to most humans.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | August 13, 1993
Mount Airy officials hope builders will note efforts to spare 33 pine trees from the ax and replant them in a townhouse development under construction."
NEWS
March 15, 1992
This Kurt Bluemel-designed landscape is the winner of a National Distinction Award from the Associated Landscape Contractors of America and is featured on the National Garden Tour, 1992. What appears to be a lovely, naturalistic reflecting pond and swimming pool surrounded by bucolic gardens is foremost a serious lap pool. The sensuous, curving shape of the 840-square-foot pool, built by B&J Pool Contractors Inc., disguises its true purpose: to provide its owners with a straight 40-foot lap, with room for a return flip at the end.The pool and garden's design presented a few challenges to the builders and Mr. Bluemel.
FEATURES
By Ann Egerton and Ann Egerton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 9, 1997
One of the nice things about conifers is that they don't dump leaves all over your yard in the fall. With the exception of larches, the bald cypress and dawn redwood, conifers -- whose name means cone-bearing -- are evergreen.Their branches discreetly lose their leaves -- called needles or scales, depending on the type -- throughout the year but are never bare. After the deciduous trees shed their leaves in the fall, the conifers stand out in full dress.Conifers are often the backbone of gardens as well as forests throughout the world.
NEWS
By Doug Birch and Doug Birch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 1996
At about this time every year, many Americans bring a small evergreen tree into their home to help celebrate the holidays, perhaps as a symbol of life's refusal to surrender during the long bleak winter.But why are evergreens in fact always green?The answer is a matter of how evergreens and broad-leaf trees over the millennia have adopted different survival strategies, particularly in how they handle the vital question of water.In temperate climates, most evergreens are conifers, or cone-bearing trees.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | August 13, 1993
Mount Airy officials hope builders will note efforts to spare 33 pine trees from the ax and replant them in a townhouse development under construction."
NEWS
By YVONNE BASKIN | December 20, 1992
Encinitas, California.--In a greenhouse in Madison, Wisconsin, a row of ordinary-looking six-inch spruce trees may represent the ghosts of Christmas future. These tiny trees are clones of superior white spruces, fortified with a bacterial gene for pest resistance and rooted in soil after long incubation in a lab dish.They represent only the second success scientists have had in regrowing conifers (cone-bearing trees) from genetically engineered embryos. The first came last year at Michigan Technological University with a European larch, and similar manipulations of fir and pine are close behind.
FEATURES
By Amalie Adler Ascher | November 10, 1990
Rare is the yard that doesn't contain at least one "Christmas tree," as people who don't know one conifer from another are apt to lump members of this major group of landscape plants.And yet, once you recognize the differences you'll quickly be able to tell one from another and choose the types best suited to particular situations.Conifers are a mainstay of the garden, their tall, stately presence infusing it with structure and even a sense of power. In winter, when deciduous trees are bare and the landscape stands bleak and cold, the blues and greens of conifers spice it with color and a warm glow of freshness.
NEWS
By Steven Kivinski and Steven Kivinski,Staff writer | March 29, 1992
With the cost of real estate forever on the rise and the size of thelots decreasing at a similar rate, homeowners are continuously searching for new ways to maximize their available landscape.One option that has become more and more popular, in this, the era of the townhome, has been the utilization of dwarf conifers or miniature evergreens.Most dwarf plants are formed through a genetic imbalance of a budor seedling which causes a branch to grow atypical. Although it is unfounded, researchers believe these mutations are the result of the plant's defense system to disease.
NEWS
By Marty Ross and Marty Ross,Universal Press Syndicate | June 12, 2005
Rock gardening usually starts small, in an area about the size of the bottom of an aquarium -- and just as gravelly -- and then takes on a life of its own. Like a weakness for paperweights or baseball cards, it becomes something of a passion. Rock gardens and all the diminutive but tough plants that thrive in them are evocative of hard, lonely landscapes in the mountains or the desert, and they can get a grip on your imagination in the middle of a lush temperate-zone garden. The plants that thrive in what would otherwise be considered difficult conditions -- lean soil and not much water -- are widely available.
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