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By Capital Times, Madison, Wis | December 3, 1990
HERE'S a saga of pettiness and arrogance run amok.Last February, the in-house magazine of the National Park Service contained a column by the agency's legislative specialist. The column began by needling Congress for raising its members' pay. That offended the congressional staff member who handles the agency's budget.When Park Service officials learned that Neal Sigmon of the House Appropriations Interior subcommittee was upset, they went out of their way to apologize to him.A lot of good it did them.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Donna L. Hansen, a former congressional staffer whose lifelong struggle with diabetes led her to become an advocate for diabetes and cardiac research, died Nov. 15 from heart and kidney failure at Carroll Hospice's Dove House. The Sykesville resident was 56. "She was diagnosed with diabetes when she was 8 years old, suffered her first heart attack when she was 21, and a second heart attack when she was 31," said her husband of 25 years, Steven Hansen. "When her heart disease forced her to quit full-time work, she devoted herself to helping those with diabetes and cardiac disease, and helped initiate an important new outreach program in her Columbia church," said Mr. Hansen.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and John A. Morris and Peter Hermann and John A. Morris,Staff Writers Staff writer Tom Bowman contributed to this article | September 3, 1993
The National Security Agency outlined plans yesterday to improve its record in minority hiring and promotions during a closed-door meeting in the Capitol Hill office of U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski.Bill Toohey, a spokesman for the Maryland Democrat, described the meeting as "productive," but would not release details of the plans.The afternoon meeting of four NSA officials, Senator Mikulski's aides and other congressional staff representatives stemmed from published reports of a July memo in which top NSA officials acknowledged that the agency "lags behind" the rest of the federal government in hiring practices.
HEALTH
Dan Rodricks | October 9, 2013
For the sake of ideological balance — and for entertainment purposes — you have to hand it to Andy Harris. He's the lone Maryland Republican in Congress, an extreme conservative counterweight to the moderate-to-liberal Democrats who hold the rest of the state's seats in the House and Senate. And he's a Hopkins-educated doctor who, with no trace of apology or irony, opposes the expansion of medical care to millions of uninsured Americans — up to 70,000 of them in his own district.
NEWS
By Louis Saenz | June 7, 1991
IN January, in the midst of the recession, George Mitchell, TC D-Maine, the Senate majority leader, declared that the American people must "do more with less. Government must do the same, to be more careful with your tax dollars."Hollow words, indeed, in light of the growth and spending spree that has followed. The population of Congress, i.e., the number of congressional staff, has now hit 37,388 -- larger than the population of 11 state capitals.Congress this year will employ almost 10,000 more staff members -- which includes personal staff, cooks, beauticians, travel agents and mail carriers -- than it did in 1980.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2012
WASHINGTON -- The newest member of Maryland's congressional delegation has hired two Capitol Hill veterans to run his office while retaining two members of his campaign staff in key positions. Democrat John Delaney, who ousted 10-term Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett in last month's election, announced Wednesday he hired John Monsif as his chief of staff. Monsif previously served in that capacity for New York Rep. Louise Slaughter, the top-ranking Democrat on the powerful House Rules Committee.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
Wanted: Flexible schedules and telecommuting options for congressional staffers who frequently work more than 40 hours per week and seek a better balance between their work and personal lives. After interviewing more than 1,400 U.S. House and Senate employees for "Life in Congress: Aligning Work and Life in the U.S. House and Senate," researchers concluded that congressional staff members are less likely than private-sector workers to be satisfied with the flexibility in their jobs.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Donna L. Hansen, a former congressional staffer whose lifelong struggle with diabetes led her to become an advocate for diabetes and cardiac research, died Nov. 15 from heart and kidney failure at Carroll Hospice's Dove House. The Sykesville resident was 56. "She was diagnosed with diabetes when she was 8 years old, suffered her first heart attack when she was 21, and a second heart attack when she was 31," said her husband of 25 years, Steven Hansen. "When her heart disease forced her to quit full-time work, she devoted herself to helping those with diabetes and cardiac disease, and helped initiate an important new outreach program in her Columbia church," said Mr. Hansen.
HEALTH
Dan Rodricks | October 9, 2013
For the sake of ideological balance — and for entertainment purposes — you have to hand it to Andy Harris. He's the lone Maryland Republican in Congress, an extreme conservative counterweight to the moderate-to-liberal Democrats who hold the rest of the state's seats in the House and Senate. And he's a Hopkins-educated doctor who, with no trace of apology or irony, opposes the expansion of medical care to millions of uninsured Americans — up to 70,000 of them in his own district.
NEWS
By SIOBHAN GORMAN and SIOBHAN GORMAN,SUN REPORTER | February 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Two technology programs at the heart of the National Security Agency's drive to combat 21st-century threats are stumbling badly, hampering the agency's ability to fight terrorism and other emerging threats, current and former government officials say. One is Cryptologic Mission Management, a computer software program with an estimated cost of $300 million that was designed to help the NSA track the implementation of new projects but is...
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2012
WASHINGTON -- The newest member of Maryland's congressional delegation has hired two Capitol Hill veterans to run his office while retaining two members of his campaign staff in key positions. Democrat John Delaney, who ousted 10-term Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett in last month's election, announced Wednesday he hired John Monsif as his chief of staff. Monsif previously served in that capacity for New York Rep. Louise Slaughter, the top-ranking Democrat on the powerful House Rules Committee.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
Wanted: Flexible schedules and telecommuting options for congressional staffers who frequently work more than 40 hours per week and seek a better balance between their work and personal lives. After interviewing more than 1,400 U.S. House and Senate employees for "Life in Congress: Aligning Work and Life in the U.S. House and Senate," researchers concluded that congressional staff members are less likely than private-sector workers to be satisfied with the flexibility in their jobs.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and John A. Morris and Peter Hermann and John A. Morris,Staff Writers Staff writer Tom Bowman contributed to this article | September 3, 1993
The National Security Agency outlined plans yesterday to improve its record in minority hiring and promotions during a closed-door meeting in the Capitol Hill office of U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski.Bill Toohey, a spokesman for the Maryland Democrat, described the meeting as "productive," but would not release details of the plans.The afternoon meeting of four NSA officials, Senator Mikulski's aides and other congressional staff representatives stemmed from published reports of a July memo in which top NSA officials acknowledged that the agency "lags behind" the rest of the federal government in hiring practices.
NEWS
By Louis Saenz | June 7, 1991
IN January, in the midst of the recession, George Mitchell, TC D-Maine, the Senate majority leader, declared that the American people must "do more with less. Government must do the same, to be more careful with your tax dollars."Hollow words, indeed, in light of the growth and spending spree that has followed. The population of Congress, i.e., the number of congressional staff, has now hit 37,388 -- larger than the population of 11 state capitals.Congress this year will employ almost 10,000 more staff members -- which includes personal staff, cooks, beauticians, travel agents and mail carriers -- than it did in 1980.
NEWS
By Capital Times, Madison, Wis | December 3, 1990
HERE'S a saga of pettiness and arrogance run amok.Last February, the in-house magazine of the National Park Service contained a column by the agency's legislative specialist. The column began by needling Congress for raising its members' pay. That offended the congressional staff member who handles the agency's budget.When Park Service officials learned that Neal Sigmon of the House Appropriations Interior subcommittee was upset, they went out of their way to apologize to him.A lot of good it did them.
NEWS
January 9, 2000
Don DeArmon, a Frederick resident, recently filed with the State Board of Elections to run as a Democratic candidate in Maryland's 6th Congressional District. The seat is held by Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett, a Republican seeking re-election. A 22-year veteran of Capitol Hill, DeArmon is a congressional staff assistant with the Appropriations Committee. DeArmon He has worked with elected officials, including Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski; Rep. David E. Price, of North Carolina; and Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard, of California.
NEWS
By Washington Bureau | December 14, 1993
President Clinton has nominated Edward J. Gleiman, a congressional staff director and Baltimore native, to be chairman of the Postal Rate Commission, a panel of presidential appointees who review rate increases proposed by the U.S. Postal Service.The commission, an independent federal agency, also investigates complaints about postal rates.Mr. Gleiman, 51, has been director of the Senate Governmental Affairs Subcommittee on Federal Services, Post Office and Civil Service since 1987. The panel is responsible for legislation affecting the Postal Service.
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