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Congressional Redistricting Plan

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By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | August 2, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The Maryland Democratic Party scrambled to complete a new, harmony-inducing map of the state's congressional districts yesterday.The plan offered yesterday would throw GOP Representatives Wayne T. Gilchrest, R-Md.-1st, and Helen Delich Bentley, R-Md.-2nd, into the same electoral pot in a district that would cover the Eastern Shore and wind around into parts of Cecil, Harford and Baltimore counties.Party planners were drawing a new "minority rights district" for heavily black sections of Prince George's and Montgomery counties.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 23, 2003
AUSTIN, Texas - Members of Texas' Democratic congressional delegation demanded yesterday that the U.S. Justice Department release documents that they say will prove that political appointees overruled professional staff in clearing a Republican congressional redistricting plan. The Democrats want a copy of the memorandum written by the Voting Section of the department's Civil Rights Division in time to present it today in federal court in Austin. A three-judge panel is hearing final arguments in a lawsuit challenging the new congressional plan, which Republicans want to use in the 2004 elections.
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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and C. Fraser Smith | August 22, 1991
An advisory committee to the governor set off a bipartisan furor yesterday by unveiling a congressional redistricting plan that would put two Republicans in a re-election race from the Baltimore suburbs to the lowest reaches of the Eastern Shore.If the legislature goes along, Representatives Helen Delich Bentley and Wayne T. Gilchrest will square off in the proposed 1st District extending from Mrs. Bentley's Lutherville home in Baltimore County to Crisfield in Somerset County."It's not a Democratic Party plan or a Republican Party plan.
NEWS
March 29, 2002
Today's highlights 10 a.m. Senate meets, Senate chamber. 10 a.m. House of Delegates meets, House chamber. 2 p.m. House Rules and Executive Nominations Committee, work session on congressional redistricting plan, Room 406, Lowe House Office Building.
NEWS
March 28, 2002
Today's highlights 10 a.m. Senate meets, Senate chamber. 10 a.m. House of Delegates meets, House chamber. 6:30 p.m. Senate Redistricting Committee, vote on congressional redistricting plan, 2 West, Miller Senate Office Building.
NEWS
October 24, 1991
Of 327 callers to SUNDIAL, 277 (84 percent) express disagreement with the congressional redistricting plan approved by the legislature, and only 50 (15 percent) agree with it. The redistricting issue should have been left to the courts, say 231 out of 322 callers (71 percent), while 91 callers (28 percent) oppose that position."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from certain segments of the community, but it is not balanced demographically, as would be done in a scientific public opinion poll.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 23, 2003
AUSTIN, Texas - Members of Texas' Democratic congressional delegation demanded yesterday that the U.S. Justice Department release documents that they say will prove that political appointees overruled professional staff in clearing a Republican congressional redistricting plan. The Democrats want a copy of the memorandum written by the Voting Section of the department's Civil Rights Division in time to present it today in federal court in Austin. A three-judge panel is hearing final arguments in a lawsuit challenging the new congressional plan, which Republicans want to use in the 2004 elections.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | September 30, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- House leaders, worried that their recess from a special session could create legal problems and jeopardize a congressional redistricting plan, decided last night to return to work on Thursday.Frustrated with the Senate's inability to agree on a plan, the House recessed last Thursday after only three days and planned to reconvene Oct. 21. But the attorney general questioned whether such a recess was legal, so House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr., D-Kent, agreed last night to bring his troops back to Annapolis.
NEWS
By William Thompson and John Fairhall and William Thompson and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | September 4, 1991
For the first time, opponents of a controversial congressional redistricting plan appear to be gaining momentum, though the plan's architects still have the upper hand.Opponents can count on Gov. William Donald Schaefer, who said yesterday that he would veto the current plan if it's not changed.Schaefer, who has not tried to hide his dissatisfaction with the plan madeby the very committee he appointed, said the proposal was "absolutely not acceptable to me."Opponents have received strong support from members of the House of Delegates from Baltimore and Baltimore County and a promise of support from Harford County delegates.
NEWS
October 24, 1991
Of 327 callers to SUNDIAL, 277 (84 percent) express disagreement with the congressional redistricting plan approved by the legislature, and only 50 (15 percent) agree with it. The redistricting issue should have been left to the courts, say 231 out of 322 callers (71 percent), while 91 callers (28 percent) oppose that position."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from certain segments of the community, but it is not balanced demographically, as would be done in a scientific public opinion poll.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | September 30, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- House leaders, worried that their recess from a special session could create legal problems and jeopardize a congressional redistricting plan, decided last night to return to work on Thursday.Frustrated with the Senate's inability to agree on a plan, the House recessed last Thursday after only three days and planned to reconvene Oct. 21. But the attorney general questioned whether such a recess was legal, so House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr., D-Kent, agreed last night to bring his troops back to Annapolis.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | September 22, 1991
Reaction to a new congressional redistricting plan that would lop off the southern tip of Anne Arundel County and pit Tom McMillen, D-4th, against Helen Bentley, R-2nd, is divided along party lines -- most Republicans support the plan, while Democrats oppose it.Despite partisan interests, officials from both parties agree that splitting the county even a little bit would be detrimental to Anne Arundel's political future.Some of the GOP faithful however, admit they could accept losing a small part of the county in exchange for a chance have Bentley as their representative.
NEWS
By William Thompson and John Fairhall and William Thompson and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | September 4, 1991
For the first time, opponents of a controversial congressional redistricting plan appear to be gaining momentum, though the plan's architects still have the upper hand.Opponents can count on Gov. William Donald Schaefer, who said yesterday that he would veto the current plan if it's not changed.Schaefer, who has not tried to hide his dissatisfaction with the plan madeby the very committee he appointed, said the proposal was "absolutely not acceptable to me."Opponents have received strong support from members of the House of Delegates from Baltimore and Baltimore County and a promise of support from Harford County delegates.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and William Thompson and John Fairhall and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | September 3, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer today threatened to veto the controversial congressional redistricting plan his own panel devised unless changes are made to resolve criticisms by Baltimore metropolitan area lawmakers.Calling the plan drawn by his Governor's Advisory Committee on Redistricting "very unfair" to Baltimore City and County, Schaefer said he may be forced to submit his own remapping plan to the General Assembly if the panel refuses to make at least "just a couple adjustments" in its proposed district boundaries.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and William Thompson and John Fairhall and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | August 29, 1991
Rep. Tom McMillen stewed silently while fellow Democrats in the Maryland congressional delegation tried unsuccessfully to carve up his district and save one for a Republican, Rep. Helen D. Bentley.But his frustration boiled over publicly yesterday as he prepared to meet with Gov. William Donald Schaefer to discuss the proposed congressional redistricting plan.Telephoning a reporter before the meeting, McMillen, D-4th, complained that his colleagues in Congress had conspired with Bentley, R-2nd, although they ultimately lost out when a state redistricting panel proposed a plan that would largely protect McMillen's district and eliminate hers.
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