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By MARTIN D. TULLAI | August 30, 1992
When Ronald Reagan, in discussing fundamental values at the Republican convention, erroneously attributed to Abraham Lincoln several positive principles, he joined a long line. Abraham Lincoln -- not Yogi Berra -- is the most misquoted American.Historians have been trying for over 40 years to set the record straight on the ''Ten Cannots,'' which run as follows:* ''You cannot bring about prosperity by discouraging thrift.''* ''You cannot help small men by tearing down big men.''* ''You cannot strengthen the weak by weakening the strong.
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NEWS
By Richard B. Schmitt and Richard B. Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 22, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A federal grand jury has subpoenaed congressional records from Rep. Curt Weldon, a Pennsylvania Republican, as part of an escalating Justice Department corruption probe aimed at determining whether Weldon used his influence to win favors for family members, people familiar with the investigation said. The previously unreported subpoena was issued by a grand jury in Washington before the November election, although it is not clear when Weldon received it. The 10-term lawmaker was at the time in a tight race to retain his seat representing the Philadelphia suburbs, which he subsequently lost to Democrat Joe Sestak, a retired Navy vice admiral.
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NEWS
April 23, 1992
READERS who enjoy being reminded of the relatively short span of American history and of the relative modernity of the old West will enjoy John Newhouse's profile of Sen. Alan K. Simpson of Wyoming in the March 16 issue of The New Yorker. Here is a sample:". . . Milward's grandfather Finn Burnett was an Indian fighter and a friend of Sacajawea, the Shoshone woman who guided Lewis and Clark. [Milward Simpson was Sen. Alan Simpson's father, and a senator from Wyoming before him.] Bill Simpson, Milward's father, was a friend of Butch Cassidy, but as a county attorney in Wyoming, he prosecuted Cassidy and got the only conviction ever against the famous outlaw.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2000
Eleanor Davies Tydings Ditzen appears in a deep blue velvet dressing gown, a grande dame trailing almost a century of American history as lightly as a breath of perfume. She was the wife of one Maryland senator, Millard E. Tydings, and mother of another, Joseph E. Tydings. She was the daughter of Joseph M. Davies, a Democratic insider who helped elect Woodrow Wilson and later became ambassador to Moscow during the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. She's been dandled in the White House by Wilson and hugged in the Oval Office by Clinton.
NEWS
By Richard B. Schmitt and Richard B. Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 22, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A federal grand jury has subpoenaed congressional records from Rep. Curt Weldon, a Pennsylvania Republican, as part of an escalating Justice Department corruption probe aimed at determining whether Weldon used his influence to win favors for family members, people familiar with the investigation said. The previously unreported subpoena was issued by a grand jury in Washington before the November election, although it is not clear when Weldon received it. The 10-term lawmaker was at the time in a tight race to retain his seat representing the Philadelphia suburbs, which he subsequently lost to Democrat Joe Sestak, a retired Navy vice admiral.
NEWS
By JUSTIN PRITCHARD | February 2, 1997
NEWT GINGRICH, despite lying to peers, you've just been re-elected the first Republican House Speaker since Gatsby danced the Charleston. What can you say?"
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun Stephen E. Nordlinger of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | April 28, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Junket or work journey?Reports on foreign travel by members of Congress, as published in the Congressional Record, offer few clues about which of their trips abroad is which.And old hands at the State Department, whose personnel almost always are on hand when congressmen travel overseas, say it's hard to tell whether lawmakers are working or playing on any of their trips unless you're right there with them.Often, though, aides from the department are right there. A U.S. embassy official is routinely assigned to escort a member of Congress visiting a foreign country unless the member refuses the escort, said one former State Department official who asked not to be identified.
NEWS
By DeWitt Bliss and DeWitt Bliss,Staff Writer | October 8, 1993
Constantine Uchuck, a retired shop foreman who was described in the Congressional Record as personifying "the struggles, trials and triumphs" of many immigrants, died Tuesday of cancer at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 101.Mr. Uchuck, known as Gus to fellow workers in clothing manufacturing, had moved from the Clifton Park area to Lutherville about six years ago.He retired nearly 20 years ago after about 45 years with the Hirshey Clothing Co. and had earlier worked for other clothing manufacturers.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau Staff writer Karen Hosler contributed to this article | November 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Announcing her gubernatorial candidacy Wednesday, Rep. Helen Delich Bentley told a Baltimore news conference that she would vote for legislation to establish a nationwide waiting period for handgun purchases.But later in the day she voted against the bill, according to the official record.Mrs. Bentley, whose campaign will include an emphasis on combating crime, says that she actually voted for the Brady bill, which requires a five-day waiting period to purchase a handgun. She insists that the electronic system that tallies the votes of House members malfunctioned in reporting her vote -- something that observers of House affairs say they have never heard of."
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2000
Eleanor Davies Tydings Ditzen appears in a deep blue velvet dressing gown, a grande dame trailing almost a century of American history as lightly as a breath of perfume. She was the wife of one Maryland senator, Millard E. Tydings, and mother of another, Joseph E. Tydings. She was the daughter of Joseph M. Davies, a Democratic insider who helped elect Woodrow Wilson and later became ambassador to Moscow during the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. She's been dandled in the White House by Wilson and hugged in the Oval Office by Clinton.
NEWS
By JUSTIN PRITCHARD | February 2, 1997
NEWT GINGRICH, despite lying to peers, you've just been re-elected the first Republican House Speaker since Gatsby danced the Charleston. What can you say?"
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau Staff writer Karen Hosler contributed to this article | November 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Announcing her gubernatorial candidacy Wednesday, Rep. Helen Delich Bentley told a Baltimore news conference that she would vote for legislation to establish a nationwide waiting period for handgun purchases.But later in the day she voted against the bill, according to the official record.Mrs. Bentley, whose campaign will include an emphasis on combating crime, says that she actually voted for the Brady bill, which requires a five-day waiting period to purchase a handgun. She insists that the electronic system that tallies the votes of House members malfunctioned in reporting her vote -- something that observers of House affairs say they have never heard of."
NEWS
By DeWitt Bliss and DeWitt Bliss,Staff Writer | October 8, 1993
Constantine Uchuck, a retired shop foreman who was described in the Congressional Record as personifying "the struggles, trials and triumphs" of many immigrants, died Tuesday of cancer at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 101.Mr. Uchuck, known as Gus to fellow workers in clothing manufacturing, had moved from the Clifton Park area to Lutherville about six years ago.He retired nearly 20 years ago after about 45 years with the Hirshey Clothing Co. and had earlier worked for other clothing manufacturers.
NEWS
By MARTIN D. TULLAI | August 30, 1992
When Ronald Reagan, in discussing fundamental values at the Republican convention, erroneously attributed to Abraham Lincoln several positive principles, he joined a long line. Abraham Lincoln -- not Yogi Berra -- is the most misquoted American.Historians have been trying for over 40 years to set the record straight on the ''Ten Cannots,'' which run as follows:* ''You cannot bring about prosperity by discouraging thrift.''* ''You cannot help small men by tearing down big men.''* ''You cannot strengthen the weak by weakening the strong.
NEWS
April 23, 1992
READERS who enjoy being reminded of the relatively short span of American history and of the relative modernity of the old West will enjoy John Newhouse's profile of Sen. Alan K. Simpson of Wyoming in the March 16 issue of The New Yorker. Here is a sample:". . . Milward's grandfather Finn Burnett was an Indian fighter and a friend of Sacajawea, the Shoshone woman who guided Lewis and Clark. [Milward Simpson was Sen. Alan Simpson's father, and a senator from Wyoming before him.] Bill Simpson, Milward's father, was a friend of Butch Cassidy, but as a county attorney in Wyoming, he prosecuted Cassidy and got the only conviction ever against the famous outlaw.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun Stephen E. Nordlinger of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | April 28, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Junket or work journey?Reports on foreign travel by members of Congress, as published in the Congressional Record, offer few clues about which of their trips abroad is which.And old hands at the State Department, whose personnel almost always are on hand when congressmen travel overseas, say it's hard to tell whether lawmakers are working or playing on any of their trips unless you're right there with them.Often, though, aides from the department are right there. A U.S. embassy official is routinely assigned to escort a member of Congress visiting a foreign country unless the member refuses the escort, said one former State Department official who asked not to be identified.
NEWS
By Information for this column was compiled by Diane Mullaly from the files of the Howard County Historical Society's library | June 11, 1995
25 Years Ago (Week of May 31-June 6, 1970)* U.S. Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, Democrat of Massachusetts, described the Columbia Medical Plan in an address before Congress, stating that "one of the most promising developments in recent years . . . is the prepaid group practice of medicine." The senator requested that a New York Times article about the plan be recorded in the Congressional Record.50 Years Ago (Week of June 3-9, 1945):* The New Haven Pulp and Board Company announced the purchase of a controlling interest in the Bartgis Brothers Co. of Ilchester.
NEWS
May 18, 2005
On Sunday, May 15, 2005, MRS. CECELIA GOTOWICKI AUMANN, age 77, of Bartow, Fl, formerly of Frederick and Baltimore, MD, died Sunday, May 15, 2005, at Good Shepherd Hospice Residential Center in Auburndale, FL, Mrs. Aumann was employed in the US Government Printing Office in Washington, DC for 31 years. She was one of the first women proof readers for the US Congressional Record published by the US Printing Office. She is survived by her husband William R. Aumann, Bartow, FL; sister, Theresa G. Evans of Maryland; several step-children; eight step-grandchildren; and extended family in the Baltimore area.
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