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By Benjamin Sheffner | November 26, 1995
AS LEGISLATION to tax and study the gambling industry moves through Congress, casino operators and gaming technology firms are cementing their status as major players in the high-stakes game of financing congressional elections.In contributions through party "soft money" -- as well as direct individual and PAC contributions to candidates -- those who make money by enticing others to lose theirs have become a major force in the Washington fund-raising scene.The most dramatic recent increase is in soft money, the funds that are allowed to be given in unlimited amounts to parties for generic "party building" activities.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 28, 2014
Probably no single episode did more to assure President Obama's 2012 re-election than that supposedly private fundraising lunch at which Mitt Romney famously declared that "47 percent of Americans" would never vote for him. The remark, unexpectedly captured on video, spread swiftly over the Internet and the airwaves, marking the hapless Mr. Romney in his own words as an elitist icon of the rich, unable or unwilling to comprehend how the other half...
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NEWS
By Dan Berger | December 12, 2001
Ashcroft won't say whom he locked up or why, and won't check whether they bought guns cause thats their right. On second thought, George won't try to end Social Security as we know it before the congressional elections, and probably won't after. Ehrlich is right. Politicians should raise the money first, then seek an office appropriate to the amount raised. Good news. Crime is down if you don't count murder.
NEWS
By Rob Richie | November 13, 2013
We are a year away from the 2014 elections, but the early returns are already in: FairVote's "Monopoly Politics 2014" projects winners and their victory margins in 373 of 435 congressional districts. That means more than 85 percent of "races" are so safe for incumbents that nothing in the upcoming year of governing and campaigning will change the outcome. For Maryland, it's even more of a blowout: Seven Democrats and one Republican are all secure in their districts in 2014. Last year, every race was won by a landslide margin of at least 20 percent.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | July 3, 1998
At last we have a president who can hold his own on Shanghai talk radio.G9Tripping the light fantastic is a Starr performance.If voters think Clinton has a dirty mind, Republicans will keep control in congressional elections this year. If they think Starr has a dirtier one, Democrats will take back the House.Just because Florida is on fire doesn't prove there's global warming.Pub Date: 7/03/98
NEWS
March 7, 1998
CONGRESS' REFUSAL to get beyond partisanship and act on much-needed campaign finance reform is shameful. The result is that the next presidential election -- and congressional elections at least for the the next two cycles -- will be subject to the same sort of abuses that are continuing to unfold.This week, a Taiwanese-born businessman, Johnny Chung, became the fourth person in just over a month to be charged in connection with the campaign finance scandal -- and the first to cut a deal with federal prosecutors.
NEWS
By Ronald Brownstein and Ronald Brownstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 1, 2002
Rising anxiety about the nation's direction and continued uncertainty about the economy appear to be strengthening the Democrats' position in the battle for control of Congress, a Los Angeles Times poll has found. But with President Bush enjoying high approval ratings and nearly three-fifths of Americans indicating they are inclined to re-elect their Congress members, the poll points toward another closely fought election between two parties that finished the 2000 campaign in a dead heat.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | November 16, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The surprising Republican loss of five House seats in the off-year congressional elections is having more ramifications than House Speaker Newt Gingrich's decision to jump before he was pushed out of his leadership post.On the Democratic side, advisers to House Minority Leader Richard Gephardt are reporting that the narrowed GOP majority of 12 seats in the House is causing Mr. Gephardt to give new thought to whether he really wants to challenge Vice President Al Gore for their party's presidential nomination in 2000.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | November 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In 1993, organized labor fought the enactment of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) tooth and nail, threatening severe retribution at the polls against members of Congress who voted for it. But the legislation putting negotiations with Mexico and Canada on a fast track passed and labor's threat fizzled in the 1994 congressional elections, reinforcing criticism that politically it 55 was a paper tiger.A successFour years later, without issuing so categorical a threat against the good legislators, organized labor has been at least temporarily successful in stalling similar fast-track negotiating authority for dealings with other Latin American countries.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | September 27, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Twenty years ago, when Sen. Bob Dole was up for re-election in Kansas in the midst of the Watergate scandal, a reporter asked him whether he wanted embattled President Richard Nixon to come into the state to campaign for him."I'd settle for a fly-over in Air Force One," Dole replied with characteristic biting wit.Matters haven't reached that stage for President Clinton, as he strives to use his incumbency to help elect enough Democratic senators and House members to turn back the determined Republican drive to win control of one or both houses of Congress in November.
NEWS
By Steven Hill and Rob Richie | May 2, 2003
THE WAR in Iraq revealed a disturbing weakness in our democracy. Regardless of one's views on the war, it's hard to defend how Congress avoided debate about the administration's dramatic shift toward pre-emptive warfare. Lack of democracy at home is a grave threat to our national well-being and future. The data are stark. We rank 139th in the world in average turnout in national elections since 1945. It's been decades since even half of adults voted in congressional elections in a nonpresidential year.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 4, 2002
MILFORD, N.H. -- This year's Labor Day celebrations once again spotlighted approaching congressional elections, as candidates here and around the country intensified their efforts in traditional parades, picnics and speeches. With the first anniversary of the terrorist attacks just around the corner, the patriotic spirit was particularly evident in towns like this one. Marchers donned Revolutionary and Civil War garb, and in nearby Salem one politician even unctuously dedicated his self-serving campaigning to the victims of 9/11.
NEWS
By Ronald Brownstein and Ronald Brownstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 1, 2002
Rising anxiety about the nation's direction and continued uncertainty about the economy appear to be strengthening the Democrats' position in the battle for control of Congress, a Los Angeles Times poll has found. But with President Bush enjoying high approval ratings and nearly three-fifths of Americans indicating they are inclined to re-elect their Congress members, the poll points toward another closely fought election between two parties that finished the 2000 campaign in a dead heat.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and Karen Hosler and David L. Greene and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 16, 2002
WASHINGTON - President Bush played to a crowd in New Orleans yesterday, extolling tax cuts as the right medicine for an economy in recession. He warned that Democrats disagree and believe instead that "to come out of a recession, you should raise taxes." "No!" the crowd yelled, taking Bush's cue. "I don't know what economic textbook they've been reading," Bush said of the Democrats. "But it's not the one that most Americans have read." It was the latest salvo from the White House and Republicans, who have embarked on a public relations blitz, accusing Democrats of stealthily trying to raise taxes.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | December 12, 2001
Ashcroft won't say whom he locked up or why, and won't check whether they bought guns cause thats their right. On second thought, George won't try to end Social Security as we know it before the congressional elections, and probably won't after. Ehrlich is right. Politicians should raise the money first, then seek an office appropriate to the amount raised. Good news. Crime is down if you don't count murder.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- While many voters are focused on the presidential election and the battle for control of Congress next year, a third competition could have even more lasting influence over federal policy.Party control in a dozen or more state legislatures will be up for grabs in the 2000 elections. The stakes are especially high because the winners will draw the congressional districts that will remain for the next decade.A party shift of a few state legislative seats in the right places around the country could have a disproportionately large effect on the makeup of Congress.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | January 16, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Two veteran pollsters, Republican Ed Goeas and Democrat Celinda Lake, have been working together for nearly seven years now in an unorthodox partnership. They jointly conduct extensive voter surveys and then provide their own analyses of the same data, each with only a modest spin in favor of his or her own party. They call their product the Battleground Poll.Comfort zoneThis year's edition suggests that the 1998 congressional elections are likely to be an unusually low-key battleground.
NEWS
By EDWARD STILL | October 10, 1994
Within the last two months, federal courts in Georgia, Louisiana and Texas have struck down congressional district plans on the grounds that each state legislature had intentionally created bizarrely shaped districts with black voting majorities.Each of these cases has now been appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court, which has stayed the decisions so that this fall's congressional elections can go forward without redistricting.This flurry of suits grew out of a Supreme Court decision a year ago, Shaw vs. Reno, in which the court held that North Carolina voters could sue if the state legislature had ''segregated'' voters by creating districts with black majorities.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | December 7, 1998
WASHINGTON -- There was abundant self-congratulation here the other day at the Democratic Leadership Council's annual meeting. The assembled "New Democrats" boasted that their focus on a middle-road "third way" between liberalism and conservatism had been resoundingly endorsed in the Nov. 3 elections.Largely dodging discussion of the threatened impeachment of the No. 1 "New Democrat," speaker after speaker credited Democratic candidates' emphasis on moderate, innovative approaches to education, welfare, Social Security and health-care reform as the key to their success.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | November 16, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The surprising Republican loss of five House seats in the off-year congressional elections is having more ramifications than House Speaker Newt Gingrich's decision to jump before he was pushed out of his leadership post.On the Democratic side, advisers to House Minority Leader Richard Gephardt are reporting that the narrowed GOP majority of 12 seats in the House is causing Mr. Gephardt to give new thought to whether he really wants to challenge Vice President Al Gore for their party's presidential nomination in 2000.
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