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NEWS
January 25, 2013
Letter writer Steve Buff writes that military spending is bankrupting the country ("Military spending is bankrupting the country," Jan. 20). But according to the Congressional Budget Office, military spending doesn't appear to be the problem. The CBO says that federal receipts for fiscal 2012 are $2.5 trillion but that federal outlays are $3.6 trillion. That's a $1.1 trillion deficit. Of the $3.6 trillion being spent, 57 percent is for entitlements. Defense (of which military spending is but a part)
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | February 10, 2014
It's only February, but it's already my favorite word -- or phrase, I guess -- of the year. (Who knows, by December it may be shortened to "joblock. ") It's not euphonious or edgy, but it does offer insight into the unreality of the Democrats' predicament. The Congressional Budget Office issued a politically explosive report this week, finding that Obamacare will reduce the number of hours Americans work by the equivalent of 2.5 million full-time jobs. This is different than killing 2.5 million jobs, Obamacare defenders are quick to insist.
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NEWS
June 25, 1995
Republicans are gleeful they have come up with a consensus outline to balance the federal budget by 2002. But don't get caught up in the hyperbole: What's been achieved so far is the easy part. Making actual cuts in spending this fall will be agonizing work, even for dedicated deficit hawks.This week, the House and Senate will endorse the deal negotiated by Newt Gingrich and Bob Dole. It makes for great campaign rhetoric. Nearly $1 trillion in overall spending cuts including $190 billion from discretionary programs, $270 billion from Medicare and $180 billion from Medicaid.
NEWS
December 24, 2013
A reader recently expressed concern over the federal deficit and faults the Democrats for failing to come to grips with entitlements ("Republicans aren't to blame for Washington gridlock," Dec. 20). He describes the state of our federal budget as a free fall into bankruptcy. In my opinion, these views are sheer nonsense. If our economy were threatened, interests rates would be sky high and investors and foreign governments would be dumping our treasury notes. Instead, interest rates are at record low levels and investors worldwide are clambering to buy U.S. government securities.
NEWS
January 7, 1991
House Democrats got the 102nd Congress off to an outrageous start by reneging on an essential provision of the five-year budget control plan. Why one party in one chamber thinks it has the right to sabotage an agreement laboriously negotiated by both parties in both houses is a matter that ought to concern all voters. It underscores the danger of giving the Democrats what amounts to a permanent majority on Capitol Hill.That House Republicans responded in a ham-handed way, muddying the issue by trotting out their perennial balanced-budget amendment, in no way lets the Democratic leadership off the hook.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2012
A pair of reports critical of military spending — on items as diverse as health care and dried meat — are part of the latest round of scrutiny of the Defense Department's budget as the fiscal cliff approaches. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office said in a report this month that military compensation over the past decade increased faster than the rate of inflation and, in some years, the growth rate of private-sector wages and salaries. Another report, by Sen. Tom Coburn, outlined what the Oklahoma Republican sees as wasteful or redundant military expenditures, including the military's creation of its own beef jerky.
NEWS
December 24, 2013
A reader recently expressed concern over the federal deficit and faults the Democrats for failing to come to grips with entitlements ("Republicans aren't to blame for Washington gridlock," Dec. 20). He describes the state of our federal budget as a free fall into bankruptcy. In my opinion, these views are sheer nonsense. If our economy were threatened, interests rates would be sky high and investors and foreign governments would be dumping our treasury notes. Instead, interest rates are at record low levels and investors worldwide are clambering to buy U.S. government securities.
NEWS
By Paul Krugman | September 2, 2002
THE STORY so far: Summer 2000: Candidate George W. Bush assures voters that his tax cut is affordable. He illustrates his point with four dollar bills. One bill, he says, represents the tax cut; one represents new programs, such as prescription drug coverage; the other two are funds set aside to pay down the debt, strengthening Social Security. He pledges, without qualification, not to dip into the Social Security surplus. Spring 2001: The Bush administration pushes its tax cut through Congress.
NEWS
By Nancy Langer | February 1, 2010
Today, President Obama will release his budget request, asking more for defense than any other president - a whopping $708 billion for the Department of Defense in fiscal 2011. Also today, Secretary of Defense Robert Gates will release a document known inside Washington as the QDR - the quadrennial defense review, a four-year snapshot of our security plans. The last QDR was done under Donald Rumsfeld, with George W. Bush as president, but be prepared to wonder if Mr. Bush is still president.
NEWS
By Nancy Langer | February 1, 2010
Today, President Obama will release his budget request, asking more for defense than any other president -- a whopping $708 billion for the Department of Defense in fiscal 2011. Also today, Secretary of Defense Robert Gates will release a document known inside Washington as the QDR -- the quadrennial defense review, a four-year snapshot of our security plans. The last QDR was done under Donald Rumsfeld, with George W. Bush as president, but be prepared to wonder if Mr. Bush is still president.
NEWS
January 25, 2013
Letter writer Steve Buff writes that military spending is bankrupting the country ("Military spending is bankrupting the country," Jan. 20). But according to the Congressional Budget Office, military spending doesn't appear to be the problem. The CBO says that federal receipts for fiscal 2012 are $2.5 trillion but that federal outlays are $3.6 trillion. That's a $1.1 trillion deficit. Of the $3.6 trillion being spent, 57 percent is for entitlements. Defense (of which military spending is but a part)
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2012
A pair of reports critical of military spending — on items as diverse as health care and dried meat — are part of the latest round of scrutiny of the Defense Department's budget as the fiscal cliff approaches. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office said in a report this month that military compensation over the past decade increased faster than the rate of inflation and, in some years, the growth rate of private-sector wages and salaries. Another report, by Sen. Tom Coburn, outlined what the Oklahoma Republican sees as wasteful or redundant military expenditures, including the military's creation of its own beef jerky.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2012
Labor unions that represent government workers — and some Maryland Democrats — criticized the budget President Barack Obama unveiled Monday for cutting $27 billion in federal employee pensions while offering what they called a modest, half-percent raise. The $3.8 trillion spending plan for 2013 would trim $4 trillion from the national debt over a decade through a combination of tax increases on the wealthy and spending cuts. Many of those reductions would affect Maryland, including funding for Chesapeake Bay cleanup, teaching hospitals such as Johns Hopkins and research grants awarded by the Bethesda-based National Institutes of Health.
NEWS
By Nancy Langer | February 1, 2010
Today, President Obama will release his budget request, asking more for defense than any other president - a whopping $708 billion for the Department of Defense in fiscal 2011. Also today, Secretary of Defense Robert Gates will release a document known inside Washington as the QDR - the quadrennial defense review, a four-year snapshot of our security plans. The last QDR was done under Donald Rumsfeld, with George W. Bush as president, but be prepared to wonder if Mr. Bush is still president.
NEWS
By Nancy Langer | February 1, 2010
Today, President Obama will release his budget request, asking more for defense than any other president -- a whopping $708 billion for the Department of Defense in fiscal 2011. Also today, Secretary of Defense Robert Gates will release a document known inside Washington as the QDR -- the quadrennial defense review, a four-year snapshot of our security plans. The last QDR was done under Donald Rumsfeld, with George W. Bush as president, but be prepared to wonder if Mr. Bush is still president.
NEWS
By Paul Krugman | September 2, 2002
THE STORY so far: Summer 2000: Candidate George W. Bush assures voters that his tax cut is affordable. He illustrates his point with four dollar bills. One bill, he says, represents the tax cut; one represents new programs, such as prescription drug coverage; the other two are funds set aside to pay down the debt, strengthening Social Security. He pledges, without qualification, not to dip into the Social Security surplus. Spring 2001: The Bush administration pushes its tax cut through Congress.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | February 10, 2014
It's only February, but it's already my favorite word -- or phrase, I guess -- of the year. (Who knows, by December it may be shortened to "joblock. ") It's not euphonious or edgy, but it does offer insight into the unreality of the Democrats' predicament. The Congressional Budget Office issued a politically explosive report this week, finding that Obamacare will reduce the number of hours Americans work by the equivalent of 2.5 million full-time jobs. This is different than killing 2.5 million jobs, Obamacare defenders are quick to insist.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- To much of the public, the budget impasse resolved last night seemed little more than a petty and partisan ++ power struggle, a study in dueling egos.But beyond the posturing and rhetoric, the clash that closed parts of the government was the opening salvo in a larger budget war that has finally been joined.It spotlighted a yearlong ideological tug of war, the likes of which the nation has not witnessed in three decades.Hanging in the balance of these struggles is no less than the fate of the nation's dominant political figures -- and the direction of the country.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 22, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Congressional and White House negotiators are finding it so hard to keep their pledge to craft a budget that does not borrow from the Social Security surplus that they are widely expected to resort to trickery.The Republicans who control Congress refuse to raise taxes. And neither the Republicans nor the Democrats have shown the will to make deep spending cuts. That leaves just one option: accounting gimmicks that would mask the use of excess Social Security revenue."Of course there will be gimmicks across the board -- accounting practices perfected over the years by the Democrats," predicted Rep. Tom Coburn, an Oklahoma Republican who is fighting mostly in vain for more spending cuts.
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