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NEWS
By Julianne Malveaux | December 13, 1994
SOME REPUBLICAN Party plans to streamline Congress may improve government operations. Limiting committee chairmanships to six years, banning proxy voting and opening committee meetings to the public make sense. But the decision to eliminate legislative service organizations neither makes sense nor saves money. It is a sneak attack on the Congressional Black Caucus, and an ill-conceived and incendiary strategy in a time of strained race relations.Money to fund the legislative service organizations comes from the office budget of each member of Congress.
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NEWS
By THOMAS F. SCHALLER | December 16, 2008
Barack Obama's presidential victory last month is an important historical moment for racial progress in America. The significance has largely been couched in terms of the election of a mixed-race candidate by a multiracial coalition in a suddenly post-racial America. This is a convenient, incomplete truth that ignores the meaning of Mr. Obama's win for national black politics, including organizations like the Congressional Black Caucus and National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, as well as the African-American community generally.
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NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | June 18, 1993
Washington.--If it were a marriage, we'd call it rocky.If it were a game, we'd call it hardball.If it were a picnic site, we'd call it ''Jurassic Park.''It's President Clinton's relations with black political leaders and it isn't pretty.Outraged by the way Mr. Clinton dropped the ball in supporting Lani Guinier, his nominated civil rights chief, the 39-member Congressional Black Caucus showed its disgust by flatly rejecting an invitation from Mr. Clinton to talk about it afterward.Civil rights groups, like the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, where Ms. Guinier used to work, also voiced outrage over Mr. Clinton's pulling the nomination without giving Ms. Guinier the chance to defend herself.
NEWS
By Steven T. Mitchell | May 31, 2007
There's a reunion going on in heaven right about now that not too many people know about. When I think about it, all I can do is smile. Memorial Day marked the passing of one of our great icons, former Rep. Parren J. Mitchell of Baltimore, a true giant of a man and a founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus. Mr. Mitchell (no relation to me) touched countless thousands of lives in his decades of service, and this story from a little over 20 years ago is just one case that demonstrates what kind of person he was. In 1986, there was this 21-year-old kid from Chicago who moved to Baltimore.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau | May 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Twenty-two years ago, the fledgling Congressional Black Caucus, unable to get the attention of the White House, announced that it would boycott President Richard M. Nixon's State of the Union address.The gambit worked, getting the dozen-member group a substantial measure of publicity and, later, a meeting with the president.Four weeks ago, the caucus, grown 40-strong and headed by Rep. Kweisi Mfume of Baltimore, tried a different sort of boycott, a parliamentary move that stalled for nearly a month House consideration of a bill favored by the Clinton administration and the House Democratic leadership.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | November 16, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The most important civil rights post in the government, still empty five months after President Clinton stirred the wrath of black activists by casting aside his first nominee, is likely to go to 46-year-old black lawyer John Payton -- assuming he converts skeptics in the Congressional Black Caucus.An unusual political minuet, with black politicians, administration officials and civil rights lobbyists warily maneuvering around Mr. Payton in public and in private, has slowed the pace of his formal nomination.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 11, 2002
WASHINGTON - Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat, was chosen yesterday to lead the Congressional Black Caucus and immediately criticized Senate Republican Leader Trent Lott for hailing the 1948 presidential bid of retiring Sen. Strom Thurmond. Thurmond, a South Carolina Republican, ran for president on a "Dixiecrat" ticket that opposed "social intermingling of the races." Cummings called Lott's remarks, made at a 100th birthday party for Thurmond, "extremely upsetting" and vowed that "action will be taken" by the caucus.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | February 16, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Members of the Congressional Black Caucus pressed President Bush on post-Hurricane Katrina reconstruction aid, the war in Iraq and social programs during an hourlong meeting at the White House yesterday. The Democratic House members said afterward that they would take Bush at his word that he would consider their concerns about the slow pace of reconstruction in New Orleans and his proposal to make budget cuts in federal health care programs. Several lawmakers said their expectations were low heading into the session -- which some, including Rep. Maxine Waters of California, chose to skip.
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 18, 2004
WASHINGTON - Rep. Elijah E. Cummings has had legacy on his mind this month. Winding down a two-year stint as chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus, the Baltimore Democrat said he hopes history is kind to his tenure at the helm of the largest minority caucus in the House of Representatives. The caucus, which has 39 Democratic members in the House, is as divided as it has ever been. Republicans control Congress and the White House, making it harder to gain a foothold for the group's priorities on health care, education, small business and a balance of local and national security.
FEATURES
September 24, 1994
Rep. Kweisi Mfume, the Baltimore Democrat who is chairman of the congressional Black Caucus, will be the lead story tomorrow night on CBS' "60 Minutes," which airs at 7 p.m. on WBAL (Channel 11)."The piece is titled 'The New Black Power,' and it looks at the congressional Black Caucus through a profile and interview with Kweisi Mfume," CBS's Roy Brunette said yesterday.The segment, which is scheduled to run during the first 15 minutes of the show, is reported by Steve Kroft and includes interviews conducted this week in Baltimore, "with Kroft and Mfume walking the streets where the congressman grew up,"` Mr. Brunette said.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | February 16, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Members of the Congressional Black Caucus pressed President Bush on post-Hurricane Katrina reconstruction aid, the war in Iraq and social programs during an hourlong meeting at the White House yesterday. The Democratic House members said afterward that they would take Bush at his word that he would consider their concerns about the slow pace of reconstruction in New Orleans and his proposal to make budget cuts in federal health care programs. Several lawmakers said their expectations were low heading into the session -- which some, including Rep. Maxine Waters of California, chose to skip.
NEWS
By leticia linn and leticia linn,Capital News Service | December 10, 2006
Black and poverty are too often synonymous, and the nation needs new policies to defeat poverty for everyone, said participants at the Poverty, Race and Policy Forum organized by the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, a Maryland Democrat, exhorted the organization and the audience to work on new proposals to solve the problem. "It is not good enough to have a report; it's how you bring it to life and make it work," Cummings said. A document from the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, the centerpiece of the forum's discussion Wednesday, said 37 million Americans are living in poverty.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 29, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Nancy Pelosi, the incoming speaker of the House, said yesterday that she would not name Rep. Alcee L. Hastings, a Florida Democrat, as the next chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, creating new uncertainty around one of the chamber's most important leadership positions. In a written statement, Pelosi said she had met with Hastings and "advised him that I would select someone else as chairman of the House Intelligence Committee." Pelosi, who will become speaker when her party takes control of the House in January, did not explain why she was bypassing Hastings, the panel's second-ranking Democrat.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | June 16, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Some members of the Congressional Black Caucus have raised the bloody shirt of racism in defense of their embattled colleague Rep. William J. Jefferson of Louisiana. I appreciate their sense of loyalty to a friend, but Mr. Jefferson hasn't given them much to work with. Mr. Jefferson's friends say he deserves the presumption of innocence. But the court of public opinion, in which all politics operates, is quite another matter. There is, for example, the embarrassing little question of the alleged bribery money that the FBI found in Mr. Jefferson's freezer.
NEWS
By GWYNETH K. SHAW and GWYNETH K. SHAW,SUN REPORTER | April 30, 2006
In a campaign in which race has been a not-so-subtle undercurrent, some of the most potentially influential voices in the Maryland congressional delegation are taking a cautious approach toward embracing a candidate for the Democratic nomination for the state's open U.S. Senate seat. Reps. Elijah E. Cummings of Baltimore and Albert R. Wynn of Prince George's County, two of the most prominent black elected Democrats in the state, have said they want to get closer to the Sept. 12 primary before throwing their support to a candidate.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON AND JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and KELLY BREWINGTON AND JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS,SUN REPORTERS | December 8, 2005
WASHINGTON -- In a first for the administration, President Bush met yesterday with the representatives of the nation's stalwart civil rights organizations to discuss a range of issues that included minority contracts in the reconstruction of the Gulf Coast and the nomination of Samuel A. Alito Jr. to the Supreme Court. "It was an open and candid exchange of ideas with the president and some of his key advisors," NAACP President and CEO Bruce Gordon, who attended the meeting, said in a statement.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 5, 1993
WASHINGTON -- At a time when Democrats and Republicans in this town are at each others' throats, the Congressional Black Caucus has fashioned a compromise that ends months of internal bickering.In a rare show of bipartisan collegiality that assumed the air of a peace treaty signing, the Democratic-controlled black caucus has agreed to allow Rep. Gary Franks of Connecticut, its only Republican member, to rejoin the organization as a full-fledged member."I've come to realize the Congressional Black Caucus is no greater than the sum of its parts," Caucus Chairman Kweisi Mfume, D-Md.
NEWS
February 8, 1995
IF things seem to be the usual mess in the nation's Capitol, it may be helpful to remember these words of President John F. Kennedy, in a speech during his first year in the White House:"When we got into office, the thing that surprised me most was to find that things were just as bad as we'd been saying they were."* * *REP. Kweisi Mfume, who recently stepped down as chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus, is on the cover of a national magazine this month. Is this in recognition of his work on Capitol Hill?
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 2, 2005
WASHINGTON - Members of the Congressional Black Caucus had a little suggestion for President Bush at a White House meeting recently: Why not put a few words about their top issue - America's racial divide - into his State of the Union address? Bush was noncommittal. But it's the sort of request that he and his advisers have gotten often over the past few months. When the president delivers the first State of the Union of his second term at 9 tonight, scores of Cabinet officials, lawmakers and activists will be listening to hear if their pet lines made it into the speech.
NEWS
By Peter Wallsten and Richard Simon and Peter Wallsten and Richard Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 26, 2005
WASHINGTON - Race became a significant factor in the debate over Social Security yesterday when President Bush told black leaders that the government retirement program shortchanged blacks, whose relatively shorter lifespan meant they paid more in payroll taxes than they eventually received in benefits. Bush's comments came during a private White House meeting with 22 black religious and business leaders who backed his re-election last year - marking a new line of argument in the president's attempts to win support for adding worker-owned investment accounts to Social Security.
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