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By JAY APPERSON and JAY APPERSON,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1995
Pushing ahead with plans to move out of Baltimore, the historic Har Sinai congregation is eyeing at least two potential sites in northwest Baltimore County.Members of Har Sinai, the nation's oldest Reform Jewish congregation, have been asked to evaluate a site at Greenspring Avenue and Walnut Avenue in Worthington Valley, and another near the congregation's cemetery on Garrison Forest Road near Owings Mills.Dr. Robert K. Brookland, president of the congregation, stressed that Har Sinai's search committee has not settled on those properties as finalists in the search.
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NEWS
By CHRIS YAKAITIS and CHRIS YAKAITIS,SUN REPORTER | September 25, 2005
On Dec. 19, 1906, the state of Maryland approved a charter that marked the founding of Kenesseth Yishroal, the "Assembly of Israel." It was the first synagogue in Annapolis, with about 150 members who met above a store on Market Space. Ninety-nine years and several locations later, Congregation Kneseth Israel, which bills itself as Southern Maryland's oldest Jewish congregation, is beginning a 100th anniversary celebration of its history, presence and service within the local community.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2002
For 17 years, a sign posted in a barren field along Littlestown Pike promised the site was the future home of Westminster Church of Christ. The sign has long since faded, but the promise came true yesterday when the small congregation held its first service in its new home. "We got this land in 1985 and considered it a blessing," said Gary D. Pearson, evangelist to the 147-member congregation. "We have waited a long time, and we can finally cross `future' off that old sign out there." It took years of passing the collection plate while meeting in a building that resembled a house more than a church before the congregation raised enough money to start construction in August.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1996
Enter the Beth Israel congregation's Owings Mills synagogue, and behold the lobby. Behold a ceiling of sprinkler heads, I-beams and naked bulbs. A floor of bare concrete. Walls of unfinished Sheetrock."Our congregation accepts this," says Chaya Vidal, Beth Israel's executive director. "They walk through this area, like the desert, to get to the promised land."On that note, Vidal leaves the barren expanse for a sanctuary that feels fresh, bright and contemporary. In more ways than one, a transition is taking place: As Beth Israel settles into a new home in a growing Jewish community, the Conservative congregation is gradually turning a former factory into a house of worship.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2000
The cantor for an Upper Park Heights synagogue was sentenced yesterday to six months of home detention for not paying his taxes and filing a false insurance claim -- acts he said he committed because of severe financial hardships. Benzion Weiss, 44, will continue to serve as the cantor for Beth Jacob Congregation. Several congregation members spoke in support of him at a sentencing hearing in U.S. District Court in Baltimore and said they have forgiven him. "He publicly apologized to the entire congregation," said Dr. Gavriel Newman, the rabbi of Beth Jacob.
NEWS
By Michael Duck and Michael Duck,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 14, 2003
Many church communities socialize over coffee and doughnuts Sunday mornings. But the Chinese Bible Church of Howard County may be the only local congregation sharing rice and stir-fried vegetables after each week's services. "Food is very important in Chinese churches," church elder Desmond Chan said. "When [Chinese people] sit down to eat, they share in the food, they talk, they share about their lives." The weekly meal celebrates the cultural and spiritual community of this Columbia-based independent Bible church, an offshoot of Rockville's Chinese Bible Church of Maryland.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1999
Just weeks before it is slated to announce new plans to develop part of its campus, Beth Tfiloh Congregation was slapped with a fine yesterday for violating Baltimore County building codes.The congregation, off Old Court Road, was fined $1,500 at a county code enforcement hearing for tearing down a dilapidated house and garage without a demolition permit.James Kemp, a county building inspector, testified that he ordered Beth Tfiloh to stop demolition work on the house April 19 because the congregation lacked a permit.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1997
The days of wandering for one small Jewish congregation in Carroll County are at an end. B'nai Israel plans to settle on property in Eldersburg by the first of the year.The congregation, chartered nearly 20 years ago, cleared the last hurdle yesterday with the Carroll County Board of Zoning Appeals and will probably hold its first service in the Freedom Optimist Club building on Arthur Avenue this week."We want to have our own home," said Barry Heiserman, president of the congregation of 31 families.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | November 7, 1994
It is said that faith can move mountains. So, the small congregation of Grace Fellowship Chapel in Westminster should have no trouble building an 80-foot octagonal church.Faith has helped the congregation grow from the five founding families in 1985 to the current 50 families who make up this nondenominational, Christ-centered church.When construction on the church began in September, it started a new chapter in Grace Fellowship Chapel's history. With weather permitting, the congregation hopes to celebrate Christmas in its new home.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | October 6, 1992
After a decade of lugging hymnals, sound equipment and other materials to and from makeshift meeting rooms at Hammond High School, the South Columbia Baptist congregation finally has a church -- one parishioners built themselves.Built on Guilford Road overlooking Hammond High in Kings Contrivance, the new building was the dream of a small group of faithful who saw a need for an alternative to Columbia's village interfaith centers.The congregation, which had about 20 members in 1979 when it first began searching for a meeting place, now has about 165 members.
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