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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2011
Wearing a purple-and-white tie and a gray suit, Feike Sijbesma, head of Dutch multinational conglomerate Royal DSM, was whisked from meeting to meeting at the Columbia headquarters of Martek Biosciences Corp. on a recent weekday. He had spoken to the entire company, a couple of hundred Martek employees. He had met with top executives. Somewhere in between, he squeezed in lunch. Several times before, Sijbesma had visited Martek during the 15 or so years the two companies had done business together.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2011
Wearing a purple-and-white tie and a gray suit, Feike Sijbesma, head of Dutch multinational conglomerate Royal DSM, was whisked from meeting to meeting at the Columbia headquarters of Martek Biosciences Corp. on a recent weekday. He had spoken to the entire company, a couple of hundred Martek employees. He had met with top executives. Somewhere in between, he squeezed in lunch. Several times before, Sijbesma had visited Martek during the 15 or so years the two companies had done business together.
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BUSINESS
By Edmund Sanders and Jeff Leeds and Edmund Sanders and Jeff Leeds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 2, 2003
WASHINGTON - Clear Channel Communications Inc., the nation's biggest radio broadcaster, is trying to beat its rap as the media conglomerate that lawmakers love to hate. But it is an uphill battle. Last week, on the eve of Senate hearings on media consolidation, Clear Channel Chairman Lowry Mays and a newly hired lobbyist made the rounds on Capitol Hill, arguing that the acquisition-minded company - which controls more than 1,200 radio stations, including three in Baltimore, and the nation's biggest concert business - has done what Congress intended when it lifted radio station ownership caps via the 1996 Telecommunications Act. "Stations were going dark," said Andrew Levin, a former congressional aide who has been hired to make the radio giant's case.
NEWS
By Ellen Silbergeld | July 20, 2008
Would we accept it if the federal agency charged with highway safety allowed cars on the road without brakes - and then warned drivers to exercise extreme caution in order to avoid injury and death? Of course not. But that, in effect is the U.S. government's approach to something that affects all of us on the most basic level: the safety of the meat, poultry and produce that we eat. Americans are noticing that food safety problems are occurring more often - and with the source identified less often.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 15, 1996
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Ratcheting up his criticism of President Clinton, Bob Dole said flatly yesterday that Clinton "does not have an ethical administration."Dole challenged the president to explain campaign contributions from an Indonesian conglomerate that helped deliver millions to the Democratic Party.Dole asked Clinton to respond immediately to five questions about the Indonesian affair, which he said "raise questions about campaign contributions influencing U.S. foreign policy.""We think the American people are entitled to the facts.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2002
Will Maryland's racetracks be the next to join the rapidly expanding Magna Entertainment empire? Magna, a Canadian-based racing conglomerate, announced Wednesday the purchase of Lone Star Park near Dallas for $80 million in cash and the assumption of a $19 million capital lease. If the deal is approved by regulators, Lone Star will become the 11th pari-mutuel track bought by Magna in a little more than three years. Magna president James McAlpine said yesterday that the company is actively looking at three or four more tracks to buy. He wouldn't identify them, but executives for Magna have been in discussions with the owners of Pimlico Race Course and Laurel Park, according to several industry sources familiar with the talks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber | December 27, 2007
On Saturday, check out the music of the Word, a "sacred steel" conglomerate featuring Chris Chew, Cody Dickinson and Luther Dickinson (of North Mississippi Allstars), John Medeski and Robert Randolph. According to Chew's Web site, the Word mixes gospel and rock 'n' roll sounds. The group performs at 9 p.m. at the 9:30 Club, 815 V St. N.W., Washington. Tickets are $25-$26. Call 800-955-5566 or go to tickets.com.
NEWS
May 8, 2003
Christopher Fairfield Edley, 75, former president of the United Negro College Fund, died of a heart attack Monday in New Rochelle, N.Y. In 1973, he succeeded Vernon Jordan as president of the fund. Mr. Edley used the organization's slogan, "A mind is a terrible thing to waste," to raise more than $700 million to help students bound for historically black colleges. In 1979, he started the fund's yearly telethon, enlisting singer Lou Rawls as host. The telethon has raised more than $100 million.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | June 14, 1995
In one of the most remarkable breakups in U.S. corporate history, ITT Corp. announced yesterday that it plans to split itself into three companies and dismantle what has long been one of America's most familiar conglomerates.Shareholders will vote on the plan this fall.The New York-based company -- a global hodgepodge that at times has owned everything from Wonder bread to Avis rental cars -- plans to divide its remaining insurance, industrial and hotel-entertainment divisions into separate publicly held companies, which have combined annual sales of $25 billion.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | October 16, 1994
In the late 1980s, as McCormick & Co. Inc. reaped rich profits from its global spice empire, managers at an otherwise unremarkable Australian yeast and hardware conglomerate looked across the water and said: We can do that.Six years later, Burns, Philp & Co.'s imitation has turned into the sincerest form of competition.As the resulting fight for shelf space in the world's grocery stores has cut McCormick's once spectacular profits to merely very good levels, McCormick last week announced its biggest-ever restructuring.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber | December 27, 2007
On Saturday, check out the music of the Word, a "sacred steel" conglomerate featuring Chris Chew, Cody Dickinson and Luther Dickinson (of North Mississippi Allstars), John Medeski and Robert Randolph. According to Chew's Web site, the Word mixes gospel and rock 'n' roll sounds. The group performs at 9 p.m. at the 9:30 Club, 815 V St. N.W., Washington. Tickets are $25-$26. Call 800-955-5566 or go to tickets.com.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | January 19, 2007
Sparrows Point owner Mittal Steel Co. NV said yesterday it is in negotiations with Esmark Inc. of Chicago to sell part or all of its plant in Weirton, W.Va., a sale that would likely keep the Baltimore County steel mill in the hands of the world's largest steel conglomerate. Netherlands-based Mittal has previously said it would sell either Weirton or Sparrows Point to satisfy Justice Department concerns that Mittal would have a monopoly on tin production in the United States after its $33 billion merger with Arcelor SA of Luxembourg.
NEWS
December 19, 2004
Agnes Martin, 92, a highly regarded abstract artist whose spare paintings reflected the simple life she sought, died Thursday at the Plaza de Retiro, a retirement community in Taos, N.M. She had lived a simple life in the artists' haven in northern New Mexico since 1991, even as her art grew in popularity around the world. She was one of America's most distinguished artists, with an "amazing ability to reduce to essence all that we feel about space and light," said Elizabeth Broun, director of the Smithsonian's American Art Museum in Washington.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 5, 2004
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia - A publicly traded Malaysian oil and gas conglomerate that supplied high-quality nuclear components to Libya is the latest link to emerge in a rogue nuclear trading network stretching back to Abdul Qadeer Khan, the creator of the Pakistani nuclear bomb. The components were made by Scomi Precision Engineering, based in Selangor, Malaysia, a subsidiary of Scomi Group Berhad, Malaysian and Western investigators and the company said yesterday. The parts were shipped to a company in Dubai in four consignments between December 2002 and August, Scomi Group said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 25, 2003
NEW YORK - Vivendi Universal SA, trying to cut $16 billion of debt, received five offers for its U.S. entertainment assets and may narrow the field of potential buyers starting next week, people familiar with the situation said yesterday. Billionaire Marvin Davis, Edgar Bronfman Jr. and John Malone's Liberty Media Corp. all bid for the Paris-based company's Vivendi Music Group and Vivendi Universal Entertainment, said the people, who asked not to be named. The assets include the Universal film and television studios, the USA and Sci-Fi cable networks and amusement parks.
BUSINESS
By Edmund Sanders and Jeff Leeds and Edmund Sanders and Jeff Leeds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 2, 2003
WASHINGTON - Clear Channel Communications Inc., the nation's biggest radio broadcaster, is trying to beat its rap as the media conglomerate that lawmakers love to hate. But it is an uphill battle. Last week, on the eve of Senate hearings on media consolidation, Clear Channel Chairman Lowry Mays and a newly hired lobbyist made the rounds on Capitol Hill, arguing that the acquisition-minded company - which controls more than 1,200 radio stations, including three in Baltimore, and the nation's biggest concert business - has done what Congress intended when it lifted radio station ownership caps via the 1996 Telecommunications Act. "Stations were going dark," said Andrew Levin, a former congressional aide who has been hired to make the radio giant's case.
BUSINESS
By Herb Greenberg and Herb Greenberg,Chronicle Features 1991 | April 5, 1991
In the next week or two the book "Rainmaker: Saga of Jeff Beck, Wall Street's Mad Dog," by Business Week's Tony Bianco, will be arriving in bookstores. It will undoubtedly be accompanied by a good deal of press attention as well as whispers on Wall Street.In the 1980s, Beck, an investment banker, became synonymous with some of the biggest takeovers ever. Wall Street Journal readers might remember him as the subject of last year's front-page story detailing his years of lies and deception, including his harrowing tales as a war hero in Vietnam, where he had never been.
FEATURES
By Tony Hicks and Tony Hicks,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 7, 2002
MILL VALLEY, Calif. - Sammy Hagar stands in the middle of his hotel lobby, giving instructions on how to properly drink the tequila that bears his label. The student is a TV cameraman, still lingering from an earlier interview, who's just received a bottle of Hagar's Cabo Wabo mixture, plucked from a cardboard case near the sliding glass door. Hagar's tone may be light, but he's dead serious when it comes to tequila. Properly approaching the good life matters. He wants the cameraman to savor the taste the way he does.
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