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Congestive Heart Failure

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NEWS
By NEWSDAY | November 14, 2001
Terminally ill heart patients have been rescued from the brink of death with a permanent artificial device that assumes the organ's pumping functions and could save thousands of lives annually, a landmark study has found. The analysis, led by medical researchers at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center in Manhattan, revealed that dying patients implanted with a left-ventricular assist device, or LVAD, lived twice as long as their counterparts on medications, the standard therapy. The study calls for a sweeping new use for the device, now only a temporary solution until a heart for transplant is found.
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2013
Gus Triandos, a brawny slugger who won the hearts of Orioles fans starved for someone to cheer for in the 1950s, died Thursday at his home in San Jose, Calif. He was 82. "My father died in his sleep," his daughter, Lori Luna, said. "He'd been dealing with congestive heart failure for 10 years. It was hard for him to get up. "His heart just gave out. " A catcher and four-time All Star, Triandos played with the Orioles from 1955 through 1962 and was inducted into the team's Hall of Fame in 1981.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2011
Ellen E. Miller, a retired certified dental assistant, died Monday of congestive heart failure at her Sykesville home. She was 91. The daughter of a cooper and a homemaker, Ellen Elizabeth Gross was born in Baltimore and raised on Federal Hill. She was a 1938 graduate of Seton High School. She was married in 1942 to William A. Miller, a sheet-metal mechanic, and the couple settled in Towson. Mr. Miller died in 1973. Mrs. Miller attended the University of Maryland Dental School, where she became a certified dental assistant in 1960.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2013
UPDATE (Feb. 23, 4:42 p.m.): Terrel Dishon Taylor, aka Smash, was discovered dead due to congestive heart failure in his Baltimore home 5:30 p.m. Friday, according to a family press release. Funeral arrangements are not yet set, but there will be a vigil on Wednesday, Feb. 27 at City of Gods (1118 Hollins St.) from 6-10 p.m. Donations to the family can be mailed to 8420 Governance Bradford Lane, Ellicott City, Md. 21043. ------------- Baltimore rapper Smash, born Terrel Taylor and also known as T-Mac, died Friday due to heart failure, according to his aunt, Arlette Thomas-Fletcher and long-time manager Swen Brock.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2011
Frances M. Clulow, a British war bride and a homemaker who assisted her pastor husband in his ministry, died Oct. 28 of congestive heart failure at her home in Acadia, Fla. She was 87. Frances Molly Smith was born in Timmons, Ontario, and raised in Cornwall and London, England. She was a graduate of English public schools. During World War II, she met and fell in love with an American serviceman, the Rev. Glenn F. Clulow, whom she married in 1943. In 1945, Mrs. Clulow came to Franklin, Pa., where she rejoined her husband.
FEATURES
By Sandra Blakeslee and Sandra Blakeslee,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 1995
One of these days, it might pay to locate sleep laboratories next to heart catheterization laboratories, some medical researchers say.The reason is that sleep apnea, a common yet rarely diagnosed problem, is turning out to play a major, insidious role in heart disease, including congestive heart failure, high blood pressure and chest pain. Yet many cardiologists and heart disease patients are not aware of the problem, researchers into apnea have found.A handful of "small but convincing" studies, all reported within the last five years, point to a strong link between heart disease and apnea, said Dr. James Kiley, director of the National Center of Sleep Disorders Research at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda.
NEWS
December 20, 2011
1. Steve Jobs On Oct. 5, the 56-year-old Apple co-founder and CEO died of a rare form of cancer on his pancreas. Following his passing, President Obama said "There may be no greater tribute to Steve's success than the fact that much of the world learned of his passing on a device he invented. " 2. Amy Winehouse The British singer died of accidental alcohol poisoning July 23 at age 27. It was arguably an ending that had been telegraphed from the beginning of her fame.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2013
Gus Triandos, a brawny slugger who won the hearts of Orioles fans starved for someone to cheer for in the 1950s, died Thursday at his home in San Jose, Calif. He was 82. "My father died in his sleep," his daughter, Lori Luna, said. "He'd been dealing with congestive heart failure for 10 years. It was hard for him to get up. "His heart just gave out. " A catcher and four-time All Star, Triandos played with the Orioles from 1955 through 1962 and was inducted into the team's Hall of Fame in 1981.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
Emiline D. Lazzeri, a Baltimore County native who as a child lived for a year in a glass-encased room at Johns Hopkins Hospital while being treated for rheumatic fever , died of congestive heart failure March 14 at her home in Largo, Fla. She was 80. Born Emiline Phillips, she grew up across the city line in Baltimore County's Jones Creek neighborhood and graduated from Sparrows Point High School. Her childhood was marked by a rare illness she developed at age 6. In attempts to diagnose the illness, she became a fixture at Baltimore's most famous medical institution for one year and linked to one of its most renowned doctors forever.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
Emiline D. Lazzeri, a Baltimore County native who as a child lived for a year in a glass-encased room at Johns Hopkins Hospital while being treated for rheumatic fever , died of congestive heart failure March 14 at her home in Largo, Fla. She was 80. Born Emiline Phillips, she grew up across the city line in Baltimore County's Jones Creek neighborhood and graduated from Sparrows Point High School. Her childhood was marked by a rare illness she developed at age 6. In attempts to diagnose the illness, she became a fixture at Baltimore's most famous medical institution for one year and linked to one of its most renowned doctors forever.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
Agnes E. May, a homemaker and volunteer, died Saturday of congestive heart failure at St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 88. A daughter of a Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. grocery store manager and a homemaker, Agnes Edith Ripple was born in Baltimore and raised on 36th Street in Govans. She was a 1940 graduate of Seton High School. In her youth, she enjoyed ice skating and was a semiprofessional bowler at the old North Avenue Sports Center, where she won a Triangle Sports Trophy in 1944.
NEWS
December 20, 2011
1. Steve Jobs On Oct. 5, the 56-year-old Apple co-founder and CEO died of a rare form of cancer on his pancreas. Following his passing, President Obama said "There may be no greater tribute to Steve's success than the fact that much of the world learned of his passing on a device he invented. " 2. Amy Winehouse The British singer died of accidental alcohol poisoning July 23 at age 27. It was arguably an ending that had been telegraphed from the beginning of her fame.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2011
Ellen E. Miller, a retired certified dental assistant, died Monday of congestive heart failure at her Sykesville home. She was 91. The daughter of a cooper and a homemaker, Ellen Elizabeth Gross was born in Baltimore and raised on Federal Hill. She was a 1938 graduate of Seton High School. She was married in 1942 to William A. Miller, a sheet-metal mechanic, and the couple settled in Towson. Mr. Miller died in 1973. Mrs. Miller attended the University of Maryland Dental School, where she became a certified dental assistant in 1960.
NEWS
September 14, 2009
Congestive heart failure refers to a large number of conditions that affect the structure or function of the heart, making it more difficult for the heart to supply sufficient blood flow to meet the body's needs. Dr. Michael E. Silverman of Cardiovascular Specialists of Central Maryland and chief of medicine at Howard County General Hospital writes about the causes of and treatments for the problem. * Congestive heart failure occurs when one or more of the heart's chambers loses the ability to maintain proper blood flow.
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