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Congenital Heart Disease

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HEALTH
August 29, 2012
All newborns in Maryland will be screened for critical congenital heart disease beginning Sept. 1, state health officials announced Wednesday. CCHD is any heart defect present at birth that can potentially cause serious illness or death in the first weeks of life. The federal government in 2011 listed CCHD as one of the diseases it recommends screening for in newborns.  New Jersey and Indiana are also now screening for CCHD with other states planning to begin in the near future, according to the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2013
Services for 6-year-old Teresa Bartlinski will be held at St. Mark Church in Catonsville on Friday and Saturday, the family's pastor said Tuesday. Viewings for the child, who died Monday at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, will be held Friday from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., the Rev. Christopher J. Whatley said. The church is at 30 Melvin Avenue. A Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Saturday. A burial in Woodlawn will follow. Teresa, who was born in China with a congenital heart disease, died after an unsuccessful attempt by doctors to implant an artificial heart in her chest.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | September 19, 2012
Stem cells from newborns appear to have a much greater ability to restore heart function than adult stem cells, according to a new study from University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers who were looking for ways to mend children's broken hearts. It was the first study to compare the regenerative abilities of the stem cells. And the lab and animal studies showed a three-fold ability of newborn cells to restore heart function. The study is published in the September 11 issue of Circulation . “The surprising finding is that the cells from neonates are extremely regenerative and perform better than adult stem cells,” said the study's senor author Dr. Sunjay Kaushal, associate professor of surgery at Maryland and director of pediatric cardiac surgery at the University of Maryland Medical Center.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2013
Doctors determined that Teresa Bartlinski, the 6-year-old Catonsville girl struggling to accept a donor's heart, will be re-listed on the transplant list. The family announced on their blog, ourplacecalledhome.blogspot.com, that Teresa will remain on life support at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia until Monday when she will receive an artificial heart to bridge the time until another donor heart is available. The child, who was born in China with a congenital heart disease, waited for nearly a year for the heart transplant she received less than two weeks ago. Teresa was adopted by a devout Roman Catholic family from Catonsville that has enlisted their church, St. Mark, and community to pray for a miracle.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | March 1, 1991
The first vaccine since the 1960s for a potentially life-threatening viral infection that hospitalizes 100,000 infants and preschoolers each year may be tested in susceptible babies in Baltimore by next winter.Dr. Leonard Krilov, a New York pediatric infectious disease expert, said yesterday the University of Maryland Medical Center has applied for a National Health Institutes contract to be one of 10 to 20 centers to use the vaccine in clinical trials that for the first time would involve babies by 1992.
NEWS
March 27, 2002
The student: Jessica Jones, 17 School: Centennial High Special achievement: A member of the Maryland Special Olympics Athlete Congress, Jessica is an advocate for developmentally disabled athletes like herself. Last year, she served as the co-master of ceremonies at the Fall Sports Festival Games at Mount St. Mary's College, where she introduced Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett. A participant in more than 20 area golf tournaments, Jessica has earned gold, silver and bronze medals. In 2000, she competed in the first Special Olympics National Invitational Golf Tournament in Tennessee.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2013
Doctors determined that Teresa Bartlinski, the 6-year-old Catonsville girl struggling to accept a donor's heart, will be re-listed on the transplant list. The family announced on their blog, ourplacecalledhome.blogspot.com, that Teresa will remain on life support at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia until Monday when she will receive an artificial heart to bridge the time until another donor heart is available. The child, who was born in China with a congenital heart disease, waited for nearly a year for the heart transplant she received less than two weeks ago. Teresa was adopted by a devout Roman Catholic family from Catonsville that has enlisted their church, St. Mark, and community to pray for a miracle.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2013
Services for 6-year-old Teresa Bartlinski will be held at St. Mark Church in Catonsville on Friday and Saturday, the family's pastor said Tuesday. Viewings for the child, who died Monday at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, will be held Friday from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., the Rev. Christopher J. Whatley said. The church is at 30 Melvin Avenue. A Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Saturday. A burial in Woodlawn will follow. Teresa, who was born in China with a congenital heart disease, died after an unsuccessful attempt by doctors to implant an artificial heart in her chest.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,SUN REPORTER | January 16, 2007
Dr. Ali Mehrizi, a pediatrician who practiced for four decades on the Eastern Shore after conducting pioneering research on congenital heart disease during the 1950s and '60s, died Jan. 9 at Johns Hopkins Hospital of complications after undergoing gall bladder surgery. He was 81.Dr. Mehrizi, who lived in Bozman and practiced until the week he fell ill, was born in Mehriz, Iran. His mother died when he was young, and he was raised mainly by his father on a farm. He worked at a children's hospital while he studied medicine at the University of Tehran, according to his wife, the former Behjat Shapouri, whom he married in 1950.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
Ann Bartlinski placed the Eucharist and a pearl-beaded rosary blessed by the hands of the late Pope John Paul II on the chest of her 6-year-old daughter, Teresa, who lay Tuesday in a hospital bed, her tiny body rejecting a donor's heart. Teresa remained still, connected to life support at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia while her parents, Ed and Ann Bartlinski of Catonsville, their parish priest, the Rev. Christopher J. Whatley of St. Mark Church, and the community prayed for a miracle.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
Ann Bartlinski placed the Eucharist and a pearl-beaded rosary blessed by the hands of the late Pope John Paul II on the chest of her 6-year-old daughter, Teresa, who lay Tuesday in a hospital bed, her tiny body rejecting a donor's heart. Teresa remained still, connected to life support at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia while her parents, Ed and Ann Bartlinski of Catonsville, their parish priest, the Rev. Christopher J. Whatley of St. Mark Church, and the community prayed for a miracle.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2013
After more than 100 pitches, the fastball had lost some steam and the breaking ball that baffled batters earlier in the game didn't have the same snap. South River senior pitcher Scott Mitchell, his dirty jersey showing the effects of an already demanding day, took a deep breath as pitching coach Gary Gubbings approached the mound for a second visit in the seventh inning. "Can you get this last guy out?" Gubbings asked as he looked the No. 5 Seahawks' ace in the eyes. Mitchell's response was quick and direct: "I got him. " With two runners on against No. 10 Severna Park in an Anne Arundel County matchup, Mitchell threw a high fastball that Falcons second baseman Danny Fulton swung through for the third strike to end the Seahawks' 2-1 win in early April.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | September 19, 2012
Stem cells from newborns appear to have a much greater ability to restore heart function than adult stem cells, according to a new study from University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers who were looking for ways to mend children's broken hearts. It was the first study to compare the regenerative abilities of the stem cells. And the lab and animal studies showed a three-fold ability of newborn cells to restore heart function. The study is published in the September 11 issue of Circulation . “The surprising finding is that the cells from neonates are extremely regenerative and perform better than adult stem cells,” said the study's senor author Dr. Sunjay Kaushal, associate professor of surgery at Maryland and director of pediatric cardiac surgery at the University of Maryland Medical Center.
HEALTH
August 29, 2012
All newborns in Maryland will be screened for critical congenital heart disease beginning Sept. 1, state health officials announced Wednesday. CCHD is any heart defect present at birth that can potentially cause serious illness or death in the first weeks of life. The federal government in 2011 listed CCHD as one of the diseases it recommends screening for in newborns.  New Jersey and Indiana are also now screening for CCHD with other states planning to begin in the near future, according to the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,SUN REPORTER | January 16, 2007
Dr. Ali Mehrizi, a pediatrician who practiced for four decades on the Eastern Shore after conducting pioneering research on congenital heart disease during the 1950s and '60s, died Jan. 9 at Johns Hopkins Hospital of complications after undergoing gall bladder surgery. He was 81.Dr. Mehrizi, who lived in Bozman and practiced until the week he fell ill, was born in Mehriz, Iran. His mother died when he was young, and he was raised mainly by his father on a farm. He worked at a children's hospital while he studied medicine at the University of Tehran, according to his wife, the former Behjat Shapouri, whom he married in 1950.
NEWS
March 27, 2002
The student: Jessica Jones, 17 School: Centennial High Special achievement: A member of the Maryland Special Olympics Athlete Congress, Jessica is an advocate for developmentally disabled athletes like herself. Last year, she served as the co-master of ceremonies at the Fall Sports Festival Games at Mount St. Mary's College, where she introduced Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett. A participant in more than 20 area golf tournaments, Jessica has earned gold, silver and bronze medals. In 2000, she competed in the first Special Olympics National Invitational Golf Tournament in Tennessee.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2013
After more than 100 pitches, the fastball had lost some steam and the breaking ball that baffled batters earlier in the game didn't have the same snap. South River senior pitcher Scott Mitchell, his dirty jersey showing the effects of an already demanding day, took a deep breath as pitching coach Gary Gubbings approached the mound for a second visit in the seventh inning. "Can you get this last guy out?" Gubbings asked as he looked the No. 5 Seahawks' ace in the eyes. Mitchell's response was quick and direct: "I got him. " With two runners on against No. 10 Severna Park in an Anne Arundel County matchup, Mitchell threw a high fastball that Falcons second baseman Danny Fulton swung through for the third strike to end the Seahawks' 2-1 win in early April.
NEWS
September 17, 2004
On Septenber 14, 2004, LIAM DOUGLAS KELLEY, eleven month old son of Christopher and Heather Muller Kelley of Mt Airy, MD. from complications of congenital heart disease. He was born October 9, 2003. Also survived by grandparents Gary and Kathy Muller of Gambrills and Richard and Helen Kelley of Annapolis, great-grandparents Dorothy Reilly, Albert and Muriel Muller, Richard Kelley and John Floyd; also aunt Kim Mc Nutt of Gambrills and uncles Matt and Andy Kelley of Stevensville and Gaithersburg A Memorial Service will be held at 11 A.M. Saturday, September 18 at C.O.A.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | March 1, 1991
The first vaccine since the 1960s for a potentially life-threatening viral infection that hospitalizes 100,000 infants and preschoolers each year may be tested in susceptible babies in Baltimore by next winter.Dr. Leonard Krilov, a New York pediatric infectious disease expert, said yesterday the University of Maryland Medical Center has applied for a National Health Institutes contract to be one of 10 to 20 centers to use the vaccine in clinical trials that for the first time would involve babies by 1992.
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