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Conflicts Of Interest

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NEWS
December 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Vice President Dan Quayle and a top aide should have withdrawn from participation on a special White House council when it dealt with matters related to their financial interests, a congressional hearing was told yesterday.Two law professors said Mr. Quayle, chairman of the White House Council on Competitiveness,improperly considered a recycling rule that affects his family-owned newspaper investment.Also, Allan B. Hubbard, the council's executive director and Mr. Quayle's deputy chief of staff, should have stopped participating in clean-air discussions because of his investments in a chemical firm and power company, the witnesses said.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
When a high-ranking O'Malley administration official was fired after allegedly steering about $774,000 in federal grant money to a company to which the official had close ties, no announcement was made. Only this week was the dismissal two years ago made public by legislative auditors. Auditors revealed that an inspector general had completed a report in 2013 that found misuse of government funds and a "serious conflict of interest" on the part of the top official of the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation's Division of Workforce Development.
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NEWS
May 21, 2000
NEW YORK - Across the nation, thousands of state legislators are mixing personal and government business, despite conflict-of-interest and disclosure laws that discourage it, according to a study released today. The Center for Public Integrity found that at least one in five legislators help regulate their own business or professional interests, have financial ties to organizations that lobby state government, and might receive income from agencies they oversee. "You'd better watch these people very closely.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
High finance is a small world, just as Baltimore is a small town, and it showed as potential conflicts of interest cropped up during a fight over ownership of the city's biggest local bank. Two groups bid for 1st Mariner Bank in an April 10 auction, held because its parent company is in bankruptcy protection. The parent, First Mariner Bancorp, initially named Pennsylvania-based National Penn Bank the winner, saying its advisers and creditors considered that bidder more likely to get quick regulatory approval.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | March 22, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The federal government proposed new rules yesterday that would make it tougher for scientists with industry ties to offer advice about approving new drugs and medical devices. The Food and Drug Administration said that most scientists with $50,000 or more in stock, consulting fees or other financial links to companies should be barred from making recommendations to the agency about a related product.
NEWS
By David Willman and David Willman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 12, 2005
BETHESDA - The director of the National Institutes of Health - describing consulting payments from drug companies as a "systemic problem" that threatened the integrity of his agency - has called for a summit of government and academic leaders to address conflicts of interest throughout American medical research. Dr. Elias A. Zerhouni last week banned all of his agency's scientists from accepting consulting fees, stock or any other compensation from the biomedical industry. He also instructed the scientists to divest stock holdings in any biomedical company.
NEWS
By Julie Jason | February 1, 2004
Don't underestimate how potential conflicts of interest can hurt you when you're dealing with professionals in the world of finance. It is common to turn to your accountant or attorney when it comes time to find a financial adviser. Your lawyer or accountant comes into contact with financial advisers as a matter of course, and many readily recommend them to friends, family and clients. Before going with an adviser referred to you this way, take some precautions. First, ask about "due diligence," a legal concept that defines the level of judgment, care, prudence and activity a person would reasonably be expected to exercise under particular circumstances.
NEWS
By David Willman and David Willman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 26, 2005
WASHINGTON - After six months of review, the National Institutes of Health will retain its ban against agency scientists taking consulting fees from drug companies but will not require the scientists to sell all their industry stock holdings, the agency announced yesterday. Scientists at NIH also will now be allowed to accept fees for delivering lectures to some groups and for serving on data-safety-monitoring boards, so long as any financial support from the companies is first paid to an intermediary organization, such as a college or a hospital, as an "unrestricted grant."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Abigail Tucker and Chris Kaltenbach and Abigail Tucker and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2005
In his final column for The New York Times, former Hollywood reporter Bernard Weinraub included a startling confession: That perhaps he should have stopped writing about the film industry after marrying a powerful studio executive. "Clearly, I stayed too long on my beat, clinging to a notion that I could sidestep conflicts of interest by avoiding direct coverage of Sony," he wrote last Sunday of his 1997 marriage to Amy Pascal, who would later become the chairwoman of Sony Pictures. Weinraub switched coverage areas several years after the fact, but critics maintained that this was too late, and in the column, Weinraub expressed regret that his marriage may have sullied his newspaper's reputation.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2002
When Howard County's school board met in closed session to talk about extending school Superintendent John R. O'Rourke's contract last month , County Councilman-elect and lawyer Ken Ulman was among the meeting's harshest public critics. "I find this matter to be quite troubling and just think these actions clearly violated the intent of the law, which is to be an open process," Ulman told The Sun last month . But Ulman's comments resonated in an unexpected way because his firm, Hodes, Ulman, Pessin & Katz, is defending the school board in court against a citizen's open-meetings lawsuit.
NEWS
January 10, 2014
On Dec. 20 of last year, Del. Pat McDonough filed a conflict-of-interest complaint with the Baltimore County school board's ethics panel over a part-time job Superintendent Dallas Dance took with a company that received a contract with the school system in December 2012 ( "Delegate files complaint with ethics panel over Dance's consulting job," Dec. 30). Superintendent Dance has since resigned his consulting position with the firm. The county ethics panel, which is an independent body, reviewed Mr. Dance's contract and the school system's ethics policy and determined that his performance as superintendent was not adversely impacted by the part-time consulting.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2013
A Maryland legislator has filed a complaint with the Baltimore County school board's ethics panel, saying he wants them to rule on whether Superintendent Dallas Dance violated board policy when he took a part-time job with a company doing business with the school system. Dance took a part-time job in August, training Chicago principals with a for-profit company that had received a $875,000 contract with the school system in December 2012. He also did not notify the board ahead of time about the job, which his contract required.
NEWS
December 22, 2013
Despite all of the discussion about Baltimore County Superintendent Dallas Dance's part-time job with SUPES Academy, no one has yet questioned the apparent conflict of interest of Mr. Dance working for a company that has a no-bid contract with the school system he leads ( "School board says Dance should have gotten its OK before taking consulting job," Dec. 17). Everyone has focused on his taking a position without prior approval of the board. But given his salary of $260,000 a year, one has to question why did he take the position with this firm?
NEWS
July 8, 2013
I was stricken by your recent review of the current show at the Lewis Museum ("'Ashe to Amen' exhibit at Reginald Lewis museum raises questions," June 29). Your focus seemed ill-advised and neglected the strengths of the show that curator Leslie King-Hammond has assembled. I saw the exhibition with a group of very intelligent, art savvy women who were enchanted by it. Let's be reminded that the show originated in New York at the American Bible Museum, where I first saw it. Some of your criticism of conflict of interest would not apply to this venue.
NEWS
By Brenda Pridgen | February 25, 2013
On Feb. 15, the Baltimore City Democratic State Central Committee-45th District convened at the Oliver Community Center to select a candidate to assume the seat once held by Del. Hattie Harrison, a longtime political stalwart in East Baltimore who died last month. Ten candidates interviewed for the position, three of whom were also members of the committee conducting the interviews, before Nina Harper, director of the Oliver Community Association, was chosen for the position. At no time did the chair or committee members appear to think it was inappropriate for them to participate as final arbiters of the decision as to who should succeed Delegate Harrison.
NEWS
February 5, 2013
In 2012, the Maryland General Assembly considered legislation reauthorizing the state Real Estate Commission, including a series of amendments related to an obscure function of that agency, a fund that compensates victims of bad actions by licensed real estate professionals. Those who have suffered a loss due to fraud, theft, embezzlement or other offenses by a licensee can get compensation from a state fund, which the offending party must pay back, with interest and fees. The amendments to the bill would have reduced the maximum interest rate, provided for the elimination of fees under some circumstances and allowed for the reinstatement of the offender's a real estate license during the repayment period.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 10, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Democrats directed new attention yesterday to the question of Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr.'s possible conflicts of interest, sending a letter to his supervising judge in New Jersey requesting documents related to his failure to recuse himself from a 2002 case involving Vanguard Group, the mutual fund company. After a three-judge panel including Alito ruled in favor of Vanguard, the investor who sued the company objected that Alito should not have heard the case.
NEWS
December 26, 2002
IN THE WAKE of the Sept. 11 attacks, it seemed like a relatively straightforward proposition to create an independent, blue-ribbon commission to investigate what went wrong and how to fix it. But the effort has proved to be amazingly difficult, and the commission has yet to meet. Time and again the Bush administration and many of the other politicians involved have proven more concerned about their own interests than in giving Americans an unvarnished look at how their government failed in its No. 1 responsibility: to protect them.
NEWS
January 27, 2013
You know the beverage industry is running scared when it feels driven to mount an all-out campaign against a New York City law passed last year banning the sale of super-size sodas and sugary drinks. But it's beyond shameless when that effort includes arm-twisting support for its cause from a group representing the very people who would benefit most from the law. Yet that's what played out in a New York courtroom last week, when the city's NAACP branch took the industry's side by arguing that the ban on sugary drinks in containers larger than 16 ounces, which was strongly endorsed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg, would unfairly hurt residents in African-American communities.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | January 24, 2013
J. Kirby Fowler resigned from the state's gaming commission Thursday, saying that his role as a regulator for Baltimore's downtown casino represented a conflict of interest. Kirby is the president of the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore, an advocacy group. Kirby made the announcement at a regularly scheduled meeting of the recently renamed Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Agency, a spokesman for the MLGCA said. He was the chairman of the group and will be replaced by vice chair Kimberly Roberston Pannell, a D.C.-area accountant.
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