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Conflict Resolution

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NEWS
January 20, 1991
Towson State University's Columbia center will offer two professional development courses in February."Conflict Resolution and Compromise" will teach participants how to structure their lives to handle compromise comfortably; the appropriate time, place and mood for resolving conflict; and the art of getting plans implemented by others.The course is scheduled 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16. Cost is $45."Speaking with Confidence" is the topic of a one-day seminar that will be led by professional speaker and humorist Allan M. Misch.
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NEWS
By Barbara Pash Milsten | February 3, 2014
Clinton Pettus is deliberately sketchy on the details. He wants to protect the participants' identities. Still, it got ugly when one neighbor accused another neighbor of building something that encroached on the neighbor's property. Words were said. Threats were made. Since August, Pettus, a Pikesville resident and retired college president of Cheyney University of Pennsylvania, has co-facilitated three cases for the Conflict Resolution Center (CRC) of Baltimore County. "It's been fascinating," said Pettus, who went through CRC's training to become a volunteer mediator.
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NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | April 2, 1995
Peacekeeper Josh Roth patrols Guilford Elementary School's playground every week armed with a walkie-talkie and smooth talk to keep law and order. He's been trained as a peer mediator to help fellow students resolve disputes without violence.Josh, a 10-year-old fifth-grader, is part of Howard County's first group of elementary-school children who have learned to spot trouble among fellow classmates and defuse it before tempers flare and fistfights begin. One recent recess period, he cleared up ill will among six children.
NEWS
January 22, 2014
Dan Rodricks ' focus on "disrespect" is spot on ( "The insanity of Baltimore's 'disrespect' killings," Jan. 19). In this culture of violence, there are too few tools accepted as legitimate ways to address conflict. In homes, even around schools, young people, especially young men, absorb the message that they must be tough or they will get crushed. Being tough translates to fighting, and too often, weapons are part of the arsenal for conflict resolution. Larger investments in mentoring and job development programs are needed to provide both models for non-violent conflict resolution and incentives to stay clean of violence.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1994
Hoping to reduce violence among single-parent families and those addicted to drugs and alcohol, two Howard County organizations are using an $8,000 state grant to teach residents how to resolve disputes peaceably.The Howard County Health Department, and the Mediation and Conflict Resolution Center at Howard Community College, are drafting plans to work with parents of children in the county's Head Start program and members of its addiction services support group.Officials at the Mediation and Conflict Resolution Center said the programs could begin as early as this fall, although officials in the health department say that paperwork could delay the start until next year.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | May 23, 2008
Baltimore City Council members are urging the school system to develop and implement a conflict resolution curriculum for students in grades three to 12 in an effort to stem school violence. Members of the council's Education Committee voted to endorse legislation sponsored by Councilwoman Agnes Welch that supports student-to-student counseling, teacher training in nonviolent conflict resolution and community partnerships to stem after-school violence. The bill, which is not binding, follows several recent high-profile incidents of school violence and violence by students, including the beating of a city school teacher in her classroom and an attack by students on a public bus passenger.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | March 6, 1991
Charles Lund is no stranger to conflict -- or to the practical difficulties in working it out."You might walk down the street a couple of blocks, and you might get into a fight over your tennis shoes," says Lund, an eighth-grader at Canton Middle School.And though he knows that fighting is seldom a good solution, Lund is realistic about what happens in the real world."Some people just don't think it over," he says. "Because everybody is jumping in, saying, 'Hit him!' They just don't think about it."
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff writer | March 29, 1992
Sitting in their guidance counselor's small office, the students were soft-spoken, polite, almost deferential.Without knowing why thestudents had been assembled, it would be hard to guess what they hadin common.But this group of boys and girls from MacArthur Middle School in Fort Meade had been gathered to discuss fighting. Each had been in fights serious enough to warrant suspension.At MacArthur, however, they were given another option -- attending a program on conflict resolution.The students, most of them under directives from their parents, chose the classes.
NEWS
By COLMAN McCARTHY | March 15, 1998
Last month, two teen-agers, one from Baltimore's Northern High School, the other from Washington's Wilson High School - were slain in unrelated street attacks.Wayne Martin Rabb Jr., 15, of Baltimore was shot to death and Delonte Hicks, 16, of Washington was stabbed. The dead youths leave behind grieving families wondering how and why these tragedies happened.In both cases, teen-age suspects were arrested. Even if they are convicted, they will become nothing more than symbols of a failed punitive justice system.
NEWS
By Alina Tugend and Alina Tugend,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 9, 2001
NEW YORK - Teachers at Public School 217, a large, diverse elementary school in the Ditmas Park section of Brooklyn, were searching for ways to explain to their students the attack on the World Trade Center. So they turned to a simple lesson that is part of their continuing conflict resolution program. The story tells about a drop of honey falling from a rooftop. First a cat and dog fight over the drop. Then the neighbors get involved. The king keeps saying it's not his problem. Finally it's all-out war. The king realizes he should have dealt with the problem when it was just a drop of honey.
FEATURES
By Zach Sparks, For The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2013
Mixing kids and coffee is typically ill advised, but in the case of Brian and Holly Gray, the combination has yielded pleasant results. Last August the couple opened Creating Unlimited Possibilities — CUPs — Coffeehouse in Southwest Baltimore's Hollins Market community to give disconnected youth a chance to gain basic job and life skills. Like the Rev. C.W. Harris, who was profiled in a previous Sun article, their work was awarded a $15,000 grant by BMe (Black Male Engagement)
EXPLORE
February 21, 2012
Registration is now open for the Horizon Foundation's Community Leadership Academy, which provides training for local volunteers and emerging leaders. Participants are limited to residents in the Southeast area of Howard County who are 21 or older. Focus on community leadership is one of the key elements in the "Southeast 2015" initiative, a five-year effort by the Horizon Foundation and other partners to enhance the health and well being of the North Laurel-Savage community and its individual residents.
NEWS
September 17, 2009
Children's artwork sought on conflict resolution for contest Maryland children in kindergarten through eighth grade may submit artwork for an art contest sponsored by the Maryland judiciary for Conflict Resolution Day on Oct. 15. The theme is resolving or preventing conflict - including peer mediation, apologizing, respecting differences, solving problems together, listening and alternatives to violence. Between three and five entries may be selected to become bookmarks to promote conflict resolution.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | May 23, 2008
Baltimore City Council members are urging the school system to develop and implement a conflict resolution curriculum for students in grades three to 12 in an effort to stem school violence. Members of the council's Education Committee voted to endorse legislation sponsored by Councilwoman Agnes Welch that supports student-to-student counseling, teacher training in nonviolent conflict resolution and community partnerships to stem after-school violence. The bill, which is not binding, follows several recent high-profile incidents of school violence and violence by students, including the beating of a city school teacher in her classroom and an attack by students on a public bus passenger.
NEWS
October 21, 2007
The Mediation and Conflict Resolution Center at Howard Community College has received a grant of $27,000 from the Maryland Mediation and Conflict Resolution Office. The center plans to use the grant to create a free Campus Community Mediation Program for students and employees. The program is to work closely with potential referral sources on campus, such as the counseling and wellness centers, the offices of human resources and student support services, and the student government association.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 30, 2007
PHILADELPHIA -- The men on the corner of 16th and Page in North Philadelphia say they know what their neighborhood needs to stem the violence that has killed 306 people citywide so far this year, and that does not include putting 10,000 men on the street, as some black community leaders have proposed. Amid the weed-strewn lots and boarded-up buildings of North Philadelphia, one of the city's toughest neighborhoods, the six men who gathered to talk, drink and play cards say the young people who pull guns and deal drugs need jobs, recreation centers, after-school programs and, most of all, parents who care for them.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2003
This time next year, University of Maryland researchers will launch a $2 million federal study to find out whether a program being used in Anne Arundel County classrooms can change how children treat one another, school officials told the Board of Education yesterday. The study will look at the effectiveness of Second Step, a behavior education program used in 15,000 schools nationwide, including more than 50 in Anne Arundel and several in Baltimore. Programs that teach young pupils skills such as conflict resolution and anger management can affect how they perform academically later, said Professor Gary Gottfredson, who is leading the study.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2001
Peace Camp is meeting Saturday afternoons at the Village Learning Place on St. Paul Street in Charles Village. The object of the new summer class is to teach children how to handle bullies through conflict resolution. Bullying has lately become a national concern. It has been linked to escalating high school violence, including shootings, and to psychological problems among students. "Adults in charge let it happen, all too often with the attitude, `Boys will be boys, kids will be kids,'" said Zora Salisbury, a facilitator who brought the curriculum from the Homewood Friends Meeting, where a similar workshop was conducted in concert with Quaker principles of nonviolence.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | August 12, 2007
It is part of the American dream -- a home in the country overlooking a landscape of cornfields or pastures with horses or a herd of black-and-white Holsteins. But the reality of country living kicks in when farmers spread the manure needed to nourish their crops or stir up whirlwinds of dust when plowing their fields. That's when problems begin. And these problems are just as great for the farmers -- small businesspeople earning a living off the land -- as they are for neighboring homeowners.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | June 3, 2007
Trella Jorge stood in a circle of desks and spoke in a loud, clear voice. "I don't like coming here," the 13-year-old seventh-grader said to her peers at Northwest Middle School one Tuesday afternoon. "It makes me feel bad. It just makes me want to leave and run away. Why do I have to come?" JoAnn Sanner, director of Family and Community Mediation at the Carroll County Youth Service Bureau, prompted Trella's peers to assess her situation. "She's saying she doesn't want to be here," Sanner said.
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