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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2013
A Senate committee has killed a Republican-sponsored bill to shield from public scrutiny the names and personal information of people who sign petitions to bring General Assembly-passed bills to referendum. The Senate Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee voted 8-3 along party lines Tuesday night to kill the bill sponsored by Sen. Nancy Jacobs of Harford County. Proponents of the bill said petitions should be exempt from public records laws to protect the privacy of voters.
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NEWS
By Jenny Black | April 14, 2014
An absolute right to privacy in health care is enshrined in the oath all medical professionals must take. Providers understand they cannot effectively treat a patient if that patient cannot trust that his or her medical information will remain confidential. Certain types of insurance communications can inadvertently compromise medical privacy, such as the Explanation of Benefits (EOB) sent to policy-holders whenever an insurance policy is used by a family member. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
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EXPLORE
June 20, 2011
On Dec. 6, 2010, Larry Cohen and I brought charges to the Howard County Board of Education Ethics Committee concerning board member Allen Dyer's interaction with the student member of the board. A hearing on our charges was not held until March 3, 2011. The decision was not reported until April 12, 2011. We were advised that we were to maintain confidentiality until the Ethics Board made the results public. Mr. Cohen and myself have made no public or private statements. However, Mr. Dyer has on several occasions published information and documents on the Internet and has made public statements with impunity.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Jos. A. Bank Clothiers moved a big step closer toward merging with rival Men's Wearhouse, with an announcement Monday that the two men's apparel chains agreed over the weekend to exchange confidential information and evaluate a potential business marriage. Houston-based Men's Wearhouse said the retailers reached an agreement Saturday night, when Hampstead-based Bank gave it a draft merger plan. Men's Wearhouse raised its hostile offer for Bank to $63.50 per share last week, which Bank rejected while agreeing to meet to discuss a higher price.
NEWS
September 16, 2010
In what was a tragic day at Johns Hopkins, I was appalled to read on the updated abc2 website that the identity of the Hopkins physician shot today was revealed by two Hopkins employees. First, shame on those employees. Second, shame on the media. The media's hunger for information is ridiculous, most especially when the information they end up getting is so far from being useful to the public. Interviewing someone who has a friend or a coworker on the affected floor serves the public interest no good, not to mention the interests of the hospital and those involved with the event.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1996
The state's hospital rate-setting commission approved new regulations yesterday allowing collection of detailed outpatient data.The regulations include some confidentiality safeguards, after opponents worried that patient privacy might be compromised. Still, opponents said they would continue to battle for protection, perhaps through legislation in next year's General Assembly session.The additional safeguards "are a step in the right direction, appreciating our concern that the information can be personally identifiable.
NEWS
March 11, 1996
IS CONFIDENTIALITY crucial to psychotherapy? Most therapists and most patients argue that it is. Knowing that a court of law could compel a therapist to reveal what a client confided in a counseling session would severely hamper the trust that is essential to the healing process.Common law has long accepted this principle in regard to priests and the confessional. More recently, the law has faced the issue in regard to psychiatrists and other therapists. All 50 states and the District of Columbia have recognized the value of confidentiality in the therapeutic process and have adopted some form of therapist-patient privilege, particularly in regard to psychiatrists and clinical psychologists.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2003
Carroll County Commissioner Julia Walsh Gouge announced yesterday that she has changed her mind and decided to release a report from the state prosecutor's office on allegations of ethics violations against her. Gouge had declined to release the report, which she says clears her of criminal wrongdoing. But she said yesterday that she would make the document public because she believes critics will speculate that she is hiding something as long as the report remains confidential. "I'd like to get it out there so people can see it, understand it and examine it," said Gouge, a four-term Republican.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2013
A Baltimore City Circuit Court judge is set to hear another round of arguments about the $1.5 billion State Center redevelopment, an ambitious overhaul 28 acres in midtown Baltimore. Judge Althea M. Handy has been asked to determine whether there still are disputed facts in the case, launched by a group of downtown businesses and landlords in 2010. A hearing on the issue is schedule for Tuesday afternoon. Opponents of the development, in the pipeline since the mid-2000s, allege that it would siphon tenants from downtown office buildings and that a noncompetitive process was used to select the developers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 30, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Judith Miller, The New York Times reporter who has been jailed since July 6 for refusing to testify in the CIA leak case, was released from a Virginia detention center yesterday afternoon after she and her lawyers reached an agreement with a federal prosecutor to testify before a grand jury investigating the matter, the paper's publisher and executive editor said. Miller was freed after spending more than 12 weeks in jail, during which she refused to cooperate with the criminal inquiry.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Nearly a year after Maryland's highest court tossed out most of a $1.65 billion jury verdict against ExxonMobil Corp. in connection with a 2006 underground gasoline leak in northern Baltimore County, 43 families have settled their cases rather than return for new trials. Theodore M. Flerlage Jr., a lawyer for the plaintiffs, said Monday that two groups that had been scheduled for trial this past Monday and next Monday have settled their cases. They're the latest of four groups that have settled this month, leaving about 50 cases to be resolved.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2013
A Senate committee has killed a Republican-sponsored bill to shield from public scrutiny the names and personal information of people who sign petitions to bring General Assembly-passed bills to referendum. The Senate Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee voted 8-3 along party lines Tuesday night to kill the bill sponsored by Sen. Nancy Jacobs of Harford County. Proponents of the bill said petitions should be exempt from public records laws to protect the privacy of voters.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2013
A Baltimore City Circuit Court judge is set to hear another round of arguments about the $1.5 billion State Center redevelopment, an ambitious overhaul 28 acres in midtown Baltimore. Judge Althea M. Handy has been asked to determine whether there still are disputed facts in the case, launched by a group of downtown businesses and landlords in 2010. A hearing on the issue is schedule for Tuesday afternoon. Opponents of the development, in the pipeline since the mid-2000s, allege that it would siphon tenants from downtown office buildings and that a noncompetitive process was used to select the developers.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2013
The chair of Morgan State University's Board of Regents said the university has been "severely compromised" under the leadership of President David J. Wilson and is "significantly more vulnerable" to "legal liability and political embarrassment. " Board chair Dallas R. Evans wrote in a memo to regents Thursday that he believed the board erred by proposing late last month to draft a new one-year contract for Wilson, weeks after voting to not extend Wilson's contract after the end of the current academic year.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
Howard County school board member Allen Dyer testified Friday in the case brought by the board to remove him, stating that despite being at odds with some fellow members he has "contributed to a better board of education. " The Howard school board requested in June 2011 that the state board remove Dyer in a resolution that accused him of such infractions as breaching confidentiality requirements, undermining the board's function and bullying. Throughout the administrative law hearings, Dyer has contended that the grounds for dismissal are vague and without merit.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2012
An administrative hearing to determine whether Howard County school board member Allen Dyer should be removed from the panel opened Monday with Dyer questioning fellow board member Frank Aquino for about three hours. Aquino had drafted the resolution the Howard school board approved in June asking the state school board to oust Dyer, accusing him of such violations as breaching confidentiality requirements. The state school board sent the matter to the office of administrative hearings.
NEWS
June 21, 1996
THERE IS LITTLE disagreement that confidentiality is crucial to effective psychotherapy. This week, the Supreme Court lent important support to that concept by ruling that federal courts should respect therapeutic confidentiality and that licensed clinical social workers, not just psychiatrists and clinical psychologists, should also enjoy the privilege.That is an important decision, since social workers are generally more affordable and more accessible for many people. In today's medical landscape, restricting the protection of confidentiality to psychiatrists and clinical psychologists would have the practical effect of limiting a privilege to those who could pay for it.As Justice Antonin Scalia pointed out in his dissent, the Supreme Court's encouragement of psychoanalytic counseling comes at the price of occasional injustice.
NEWS
By LYLE DENNISTON and LYLE DENNISTON,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court agreed yesterday to delve into the private dealings of therapists with their patients to determine whether such counseling will be protected by a shroud of confidentiality in the federal courts.If the court provides some privacy for what is said in therapy sessions, it is expected to decide how far the protection extends: to counseling by any medical professional, or only for sessions with psychiatrists or psychologists.Maryland and the 49 other states assure some privacy in state court for what a patient reveals to a therapist by banning or restricting the forced disclosure of such information.
NEWS
April 24, 2012
While the Pennsylvania law cited in your article "Doctors question fracking law" (April 20) "compels natural gas firms to turn over information about chemicals they use ... to health care professionals who ask," there seems nothing in it that would stop gas companies from turning over this vital information voluntarily, and not demanding the professionals sign confidentiality agreements, as compelled disclosure does. The requirement that health care researchers not disclose their findings is ridiculous, given that open reporting is a basic requirement of scientific research, and sharing health information is fundamental to any hope of public health.
NEWS
March 27, 2012
You know to bring two copies of your resume with you on interviews, give a firm handshake and immediately answer that your greatest weakness is that "I care too much. " But when you're looking for a job, what's really going through the mind of the person reading your resume, checking out your LinkedIn profile or appraising you from across the desk? So we thought we'd ask for you. b approached some of Baltimore's top CEOs, HR reps and managers to help break down the unwritten rules for job suitors as they hunt for that new job, raise or promotion.
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